Anniversary of Anzio - Jan 22, 1944
#1

When you type Anzio in the Search Engine for this section of the forum (VI Corps and 5th and 7th Armies), it comes up with this:

 

Anzio

 

To all those who were there and returned, and to all whose who were and didn't! :14_2_108::14_1_107v:

Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
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#2

Anzio Beachhead Veterans--Reunion May 1 to 5th St. Louis Mo.

WWW.ANZIOBEACHEADVETERANSOFww11.COM Rocky

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#3

Thinking of all the Anzio vets - and of course my Dad

today. :14_2_108:

 

I have the letter he wrote to his mother Jan 21st.

He must've been on board ship at that point. They left

from Naples, right? Does anyone know how long it took

to get to the beachHead?

 

The letters my father wrote just before Salerno, Anzio,

and Southern France - were all similar. He makes sure that he

mentions that he recd all the mail from home, lists every single

item that his mother sent him, tells her not to worry and then

babbles that he's fine & the weather is great. I think most of

the guys were writing similar letters home & it's a wonder that

their parents didn't think they were all on some fabulous European

camping trip (of course we know the reality was far different).

 

On Jan 21, he'd just recd letters they'd written before Christmas,

so it was taking about a month to get mail. That made me think:

how long after the Anzio landings would the families have to wait

to know if their sons were ok. A month? It must've been torture!

 

Also, he briefly mentions something in this letter and then quickly changes the

subject. He saw in the local Wellesley paper that a Dr Graves passed away &

then mentions that his son Monroe (who my father knew) and his other two

boys are in the Pacific. Knowing my father, he likely was also thinking :

"What if I'm here and something happens to Ma or Pa?".

 

When you think about the long list of things these guys had to worry about -

being killed, being wounded, being tired, getting sick, being captured,

being cold, being hot, having trenchfoot, losing your buddies, etc etc -

many of them also had to worry about their loved ones at home -

are they well?, will they have enough money?, who will take care of them

if something happens to me?

 

Notice how he adds: "this year ought to finish the war over here" NOT!

 

Here's Dad's letter:

 

"Jan 2, 1944 Italy

 

Dear Ma,

 

I received quite a few letters today - from you & Mary dated Dec 20th, 21st,

22nd & 31st, along with copies of the Boston Herald. I am glad to hear that

you are fine!

 

A few days ago, I recd a clipping about Dr Graves dying suddenly. Monroe is

in the Pacific and the other two boys are in the West Pacific area for two years

now. They left about the same time as (illegible) and a few more of our boys

from the 181st and 101st.

 

I bet that bonus came in very handy and also the $10 Mr. Fallows sent Mary.

Didn't Mary get a bonus this summer too? I'm glad you mentioned that you

received the $35 alright. There isn't any way of checking up on it from here.

 

I guess I've received all the packages you sent me with candy, gum etc -

also more soap, tooth powder, socks, underwear, handkerchiefs, and

last week the camera.

 

Well Ma, there isn't much to tell you. I am fine, the weather has been good lately -

nice, sunshiney days and warm where we are at present - so much so that you'd

never know it was january.

 

I'm glad to know that you are fine Ma - and not worrying. Remember what I always

say - it doesn't do any good to worry. This year ought to finish the war over here.

Hoping to hear from you soon- when you get time to write.

 

Love to all,

 

Francis

Reply
#4

I'm glad to know that you are fine Ma - and not worrying. Remember what I always

say - it doesn't do any good to worry. This year ought to finish the war over here.

 

Says it all doesn't it?

 

I'm so glad you've allowed me to use your dad's quotes in the documentary. I so love the personal touch. You not only learn about the war that way, but get to know the individual soldiers. :armata_PDT_37:

 

Ya, and to think that WE have worries. We don't have the foggiest do we? :armata_PDT_23:

Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#5

Thinking of all the Anzio vets - and of course my Dad

today. :14_2_108:

 

I have the letter he wrote to his mother Jan 21st.

He must've been on board ship at that point. They left

from Naples, right? Does anyone know how long it took

to get to the beachHead?

 

The letters my father wrote just before Salerno, Anzio,

and Southern France - were all similar. He makes sure that he

mentions that he recd all the mail from home, lists every single

item that his mother sent him, tells her not to worry and then

babbles that he's fine & the weather is great. I think most of

the guys were writing similar letters home & it's a wonder that

their parents didn't think they were all on some fabulous European

camping trip (of course we know the reality was far different).

 

On Jan 21, he'd just recd letters they'd written before Christmas,

so it was taking about a month to get mail. That made me think:

how long after the Anzio landings would the families have to wait

to know if their sons were ok. A month? It must've been torture!

 

Also, he briefly mentions something in this letter and then quickly changes the

subject. He saw in the local Wellesley paper that a Dr Graves passed away &

then mentions that his son Monroe (who my father knew) and his other two

boys are in the Pacific. Knowing my father, he likely was also thinking :

"What if I'm here and something happens to Ma or Pa?".

 

When you think about the long list of things these guys had to worry about -

being killed, being wounded, being tired, getting sick, being captured,

being cold, being hot, having trenchfoot, losing your buddies, etc etc -

many of them also had to worry about their loved ones at home -

are they well?, will they have enough money?, who will take care of them

if something happens to me?

 

Notice how he adds: "this year ought to finish the war over here" NOT!

 

Here's Dad's letter:

 

"Jan 2, 1944 Italy

 

Dear Ma,

 

I received quite a few letters today - from you & Mary dated Dec 20th, 21st,

22nd & 31st, along with copies of the Boston Herald. I am glad to hear that

you are fine!

 

A few days ago, I recd a clipping about Dr Graves dying suddenly. Monroe is

in the Pacific and the other two boys are in the West Pacific area for two years

now. They left about the same time as (illegible) and a few more of our boys

from the 181st and 101st.

 

I bet that bonus came in very handy and also the $10 Mr. Fallows sent Mary.

Didn't Mary get a bonus this summer too? I'm glad you mentioned that you

received the $35 alright. There isn't any way of checking up on it from here.

 

I guess I've received all the packages you sent me with candy, gum etc -

also more soap, tooth powder, socks, underwear, handkerchiefs, and

last week the camera.

 

Well Ma, there isn't much to tell you. I am fine, the weather has been good lately -

nice, sunshiney days and warm where we are at present - so much so that you'd

never know it was january.

 

I'm glad to know that you are fine Ma - and not worrying. Remember what I always

say - it doesn't do any good to worry. This year ought to finish the war over here.

Hoping to hear from you soon- when you get time to write.

 

Love to all,

 

Francis

206thmpco--answer to the first paragraph-- 2 lifetimes--0ne at Salerno

One at Anzio. Rocky

Reply
#6

Roque,

 

You're answer is perfect! "Two lifetimes" - it surely must've felt exactly like that!!!

:armata_PDT_37:

M1,

 

One of the things I'm most grateful for are my Dad's

war letters, cards, and vmails. What a blessing that I found them!

I wish I knew about them while he was living, but having them has allowed me to know him

more completely now. I learned alot and am still learning - thanks to you & all the 6th

Corps "Peeps"! That's what it's all about, isn't it? Understanding what they did, what they

sacrificed, and only some bit of what they feared - pulls me up short whenever I start

grousing about any of my petty problems. I look back on moments of my childhood when

I might've said to him: "Dad, I'm too tired.." to do such & such :bs: or "Dad, I have homework

& can't be raking leaves now". Tired? What on earth did I know about being tired??

That's what we're all here for after all - to smarten up! I'm sure if I asked him: "How

am I doin', Dad?" - he'd grin & say I had a ways to go yet.

 

m2

Reply


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