Getting the medals you deserved!
#11

Here ya go sweetie.

 

http://www.gruntsmilitary.com/aoom.shtml

 

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Criteria: The medal was awarded for 30 days consecutive service while assigned to:

 

a. Germany (excluding Berlin) between 9 May 1945 and 5 May 1955. Service between 9 May and 8 November 1945 will count only if the EAME Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 9 May 1945.

 

b. Austria between 9 May 1945 and 27 July 1955. Service between 9 May and 18 November 1945 will count only if the EAME Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 9 May 1945.

 

c. Berlin between 9 May 1945 and 2 October 1990. Service between 9 May and 8 November 1945 may be counted only if the EAME Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 9 May 1945.

 

d. Italy between 9 May 1945 and 15 September 1947 in the compartment of Venezia Giulia E. Zara or Province of Udine, or with a unit in Italy designated in DA General Order 4, 1947. Service between 9 May and 8 November 1945 may be counted only if the EAME Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 9 May 1945.

 

e. Japan between 3 September 1945 and 27 April 1952 in the four main islands of Hokkaido, Honshu, Shikoku and Kyushu; the surrounding smaller islands of the Japanese homeland; the Ryukyu Islands; and the Bonin-Volcano Islands. Service between 3 September 1945 and 2 March 1946 will be counted only if the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 3 September 1945.

 

f. Korea between 3 September 1945 and 29 June 1949. Service between 3 September 1945 and 2 March 1946 will be counted only if the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 3 September 1945.

 

4. Components: The following are authorized components:

 

a. Army Medal (regular size): MIL-DTL-3943/246. Medal set with full size medal and ribbon bar. NSN 8455-00-269-5763.

 

b. Army Medal (miniature): MIL-DTL-3943/246. Available commercially.

 

c. Ribbon: MIL-DTL-11589/112. NSN 8455-00-265-4910. Available commercially.

 

d. Foreign Service Clasp: MIL-DTL-41819/9: Germany - NSN 8455-00-249-0171; Japan - NSN 8455-00-249-0172.

 

e. Berlin Airlift Device: MIL-DTL-41819/13. Regular and miniature sizes. NSN 8455-00-261-4504.

 

5. Background: a. The Army Occupation Medal was established by War Department Circular 102, dated 5 April 1946.

 

b. The medal was designed by Mr. Thomas Hudson Jones and the first medal was presented to General Eisenhower on 2 April 1947. The ribbon design uses the color black to represent Germany and the color red to represent Japan.

 

c. On 4 February 1948, the Secretary of the Navy requested the Heraldic Section, Department of the Army, design a suitable Navy Occupation Service Medal. This medal was designed by Mr. Thomas Hudson Jones on 30 March 1948.

 

d. The service clasp is worn on the suspension ribbon to indicate area of occupation. The Berlin Airlift Device is a miniature of a C-54 type aircraft and is worn on the suspension ribbon and service ribbon to indicate 90 days consecutive service between 26 June 1948 and 30 September 1949.

Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
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#12

Marion: Many thanks. Will E mail him in the morning with all details. He will be glad to

hear it. And no, it is not me as I spent many months there after the war till I was returned home. Must admit, I had a problem with my CIB as I did not notice it was missing from my discharge in awards, until I requested a reissue of all medals and ribbons and the CIB was not with them. (My medals and ribbons were lost when my dad died and never found as I had moved). Contacted St. Louis Mo. and they checked and

sent my CIB and Bronze Star and added them to my discharge.

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#13

Marion and Joe,

 

Very interesting!

 

I have all my medals in a shadow box on the wall of our living room. They include the CIB, Captains bars, 7th Infantry crossed rifles, Bronze Star with 3 OLCs, European-Med theatre with 6 campaign stars and bronze arrowhead for D day landing. Germany Occupation medal, American Theatre medal, Presidential unit citation w/OLC, good conduct medal, WWII victory medal, Bronze star medal with 3 OLCs, French Croix de Guerre, 4 overseas stripes, 3rd Division patch, and my dog tags,

 

They warm my heart as I pass them on my way to bed!

 

I left N.J. in 1991 to move to Florida so I never knew about the license plate award.

 

Russmedals.jpg

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#14

And don't forget..... the "cotton bail" DUI pin of the 7th Infantry Regiment.

This photo is a little dark. I copied it and lightened it up and can see it much clearer.

That is a unique arrangement with the ribbons above each medal. I never thought about that. Usually the medals are in a box or pyramid arrangement and the ribbons are shown as worn on the uniform.

Steve

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#15

The Army Occupation Medal was established by War Department Circular 102, dated 5

April 1946.

 

 

Army of Occupation Medal- authorized 1946

This medal resembles the WW1 Occupation medal. It was awarded for 30 consecutive days at a

normal post of duty while assigned to any of the following:

 

Army of occupation of Germany: 9 May 45- 5 May 55

Army of occupation of Austria: 9 May 45-27 July 55

Army of occupation of Berlin: 9 May 45- 2 Oct 1990

Army of occupation of Italy: 9 May 45-15 Sept. 47

Army of occupation of Japan: 3 sept. 45-27 April 1952

Army of occupation of Korea: 3 Sept 45-29 June 49.

 

papa Art

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#16

I have been trying to find out additional information about the medal of occupation. Does any one that has this medal have it listed on their discharge paper work? My great uncle was Honorably discharged from the Army in Nov. 1945 and the medal was not established until 1946. The areas he served were Northern France and Rhineland. Does this qualify him for the medal? If so how do I go about proving or recieving this medal.

 

I also wondered if he was even issued most of his medals. His only medal that I have in my possession is his Army Good Conduct Medal. He is supposed to have a European African Middle Eastern medal, Asiatic-Pacific medal, American Theater medal and a WW2 Victory Medal. I have read that some veterans were not issued their medals because of metal shortages. Is this true?

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#17

http://www.gruntsmilitary.com/aoom.shtml

 

Click on the above link for more info on the Army of Occupation Medal. I am also listing the criteria here:

-----------------------------------------------------------

 

3. Criteria: The medal was awarded for 30 days consecutive service while assigned to:

 

a. Germany (excluding Berlin) between 9 May 1945 and 5 May 1955. Service between 9 May and 8 November 1945 will count only if the EAME Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 9 May 1945.

 

b. Austria between 9 May 1945 and 27 July 1955. Service between 9 May and 18 November 1945 will count only if the EAME Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 9 May 1945.

 

c. Berlin between 9 May 1945 and 2 October 1990. Service between 9 May and 8 November 1945 may be counted only if the EAME Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 9 May 1945.

 

d. Italy between 9 May 1945 and 15 September 1947 in the compartment of Venezia Giulia E. Zara or Province of Udine, or with a unit in Italy designated in DA General Order 4, 1947. Service between 9 May and 8 November 1945 may be counted only if the EAME Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 9 May 1945.

 

e. Japan between 3 September 1945 and 27 April 1952 in the four main islands of Hokkaido, Honshu, Shikoku and Kyushu; the surrounding smaller islands of the Japanese homeland; the Ryukyu Islands; and the Bonin-Volcano Islands. Service between 3 September 1945 and 2 March 1946 will be counted only if the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 3 September 1945.

 

f. Korea between 3 September 1945 and 29 June 1949. Service between 3 September 1945 and 2 March 1946 will be counted only if the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 3 September 1945.

Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#18

My father's Honorable Discharge Papers also contains errors as do MANY of the docs that were issued. One of the major problems at this time, was that millions of men were going through processing and they were in a great rush to get them through. Inheritantly, many of the docs had either wrong info or info that was left off. Most of it was due to sloppy work by the discharge clerk, plain and simple.

 

It is not listed on my father's either, but it should have been listed too.

 

They screwed up the dates of arrival and departure on his too. For instance the clerk shows he departed on April 21, 1943, but doesn't show arrival until Sep 2, 1943! Doh! But, my dad fought in Sicily too which was a summer campaign. Also they do show that he took part in the Naples/Foggia Campaign, but do not list Anzio, which he was at the whole time. We even have photos. See how messed up things can get? :wacko:

Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#19

How times have changed the application of guidelines pertaining to the specific period of an act or wounds incurred sometimes leading to loss of life. The initial guideline for the Purple Heart during WWII was 22 September 1943. It covered the period "since 6 December 1941."

 

Today, military personnel and civilian employees of the AF and Army are justifying denials based on guidelines after the act or receiving wound(s).

 

Case in point, to determine if WWII veterans are entitled to certain awards and decorations i.e. Purple Heart and/or Combat Infantryman badge, AR 600-8-22, dated 11 December 2006, PL 104-106, dated 10 February 1996, and War Department Circulars covering the period after the acts during battles are being used to justify denials to such combatants.

 

Acts and wounds incurred during WWII met circumstances identified in guidelines participants served under. History was made and cannot be erased or ignored. Yet, WWII and Korean War veterans and/or NOK are experiencing such responses from the military.

 

ISSUE - APPICABILITY OF LATER POLICY

The identified AR 600-8-22, PL 104-106, WD Circulars 186, and 408 for AFBCMR and ABCMR in these cases purports to consider guidelines developed in analyzing after the fact. The unfairness of this consideration is obvious. If it were to be applied to all cases, it would call for the removal of Purple Hearts and/or Combat Infantryman badges from those veterans previously awarded them. In fact application of a later policy to facts surrounding a WWII event constitutes ex post facto application of law, specifically prohibited in the US Constitution by the prohibitions in Article 1, Section 9, Clause 3, against bills of attainder and ex post facto laws. Awards and decorations, like other rights, must be considered as of the date that the benefit was earned. Application of different standards, arising out of different sensibilities in different wars, wreaks havoc on any sense of equal application of laws. The fact that the AF and Army, recently chose to change the policy relating to Purple Hearts and CIB cannot be applied to the facts of these cases.

 

 

Robert

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#20

Difference between The Bronze Star and bronze service star - re: campaign device

 

http://www.398th.org/Awards/BronzeStar/BronzeStar_BronzeBattleStar.html

 

http://militaryreporter.net/whats-the-difference-between-a-bronze-star-and-a-bronze-service-star/

Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
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