Please help find info - 348th Combat Engs
#1

Hi this is the letter I received tonight. I have already found some info for her and will post what I found below. She would be most grateful.

 

------------------------------

 

Hello, Marion - - -

 

I, too, am trying to locate information on my husband, Frank Donia. I am giving him a surprise birthday party on July 3rd and was hoping to get information and e-mail information from others that were there and, hopefully, knew him for I am preparing a scrapbook for him. I'm trying to locate others that he was with to hopefully set up some e-mail correspondence with them!

 

The information he gave me (and I dare not ask him again or he will get suspicious!) was: 348th Combat Engineering unit attached to the 2nd Ranger Battalion, part of 5th Corps, 1st Army. Fox Red (E-3). Says he landed about 6:45 AM at Omaha Beach.

 

This website is difficult to follow; I just spent an hour getting this far! And I don't know where to look if I get a response!

 

If I may take the liberty of logging on to some of the individuals you credit with providing you with information?

 

If you choose to respond to me, please use soomartha@aol.com for I don't want my husband to see any of this or it will spoil the surprise.

 

Many thanks!

 

Sandra Donia

 

So, if you or anyone else has any information, please e-mail me at soomartha@aol.com - Many Thanks!

Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#2

Dear Sandra:

 

I have found some info in my engineering book and will copy it for you this week. I have also found several links and will also copy the info for you and create a word document that I can either email to you, or mail to you. I just sent you an email, so I sure we will touch base that way.

 

-------------------------

NOTE: July 21, 2011 - I have been informed that George passed away. Please write to Bessie below.

 

348th Engineer Combat Battalion

Mr. George Richardson

753 2nd Street SW

New Philadelphia, OH 44663-2201

 

 

--------------------------

 

348th Engr (Combat) Bn

 

Ms. Bessie Richardson 330-339-3790

753 2nd St SW

New Philadelphia OH 44663-2201

 

-------------------------

 

Are there any others from my dads unit--348th Combat Engineers who served in it during Normandy and after-who are looking to connect?

 

-------------------------

 

Otto G Stamman

Temple, TX United States

348 Combat Engineers, T/4

United States Army

 

MY RECOLLECTION OF THE WAR YEARS

OTTO STAMMAN

 

Traveled from Camp Miles Standish, Mass. by train to Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada arriving around the first of November 1943. The 348th Engineer Combat Battalion (around 1400 men) boarded the HMS liner Mauretania with full packs. This British luxury liner made over into a troop carrier was a 3 stack-in size, which was smaller than the Queens. She left the docks November 2nd without escort to avoid any possible U-boat attack. She zig-zagged every 7 minutes.

 

I had a big box to sleep in; others slept on dining tables. It was very crowded! Any and everywhere. We were below the 4th deck, food was brought up from below in tubs (my job). I ate buns and orange marmalade from start to finish; became seasick as were a lot of others. We stayed in same area the 4 days it took to cross the Atlantic - a miserable time. Encountered one storm out from Iceland.

 

We landed in Liverpool at night; with our full field packs consisting of M-l rifle, blanket, mess kit, 2 changes of clothes, personal stuff, wool overcoat, helmet. We were glad to be ashore.

 

From the dock boarded a troop train to Swansea, then boarded double-decker buses to Camp Manselton (a village) at Mumbles, South Wales. Here we engaged in amphibious training, consisting of getting on and off boats, bridge building, (both pontoon and Bailey) planting and unplanting mines. Preparing for the invasion that was to come, we were told our job was to go through wire fences, build roads and how to build bridges over water. We were to engage in combat action, if necessary.

 

At Camp Manselton (Mumbles)we played soccer on a large sandy beach; we did have recreation time off and on and this one was enjoyable. It was here at Camp Manselton we spent Christmas of 1943. "Enjoyed" 25 mile hikes on different terrain with full packs and rifles. Around the last of December, Lt. Wilson, Bryan and I were sent to aircraft recognition school at St. Agnes, Cornwall. Our teachers were mainly British -- pretty good guys and excellent teachers. Beside courses in plane recognition we had instruction in 50 caliber machine gun operation; firing tracer bullets at targets towed by the British to check accuracy. We also had a course in camouflage.

 

Left with this motto - "The Focke-Wulf may look the same if called by another name but if you know its characteristics and 50 caliberistics, you'll play a better game in National Service defense." This had to do with defending England.

The break from regular camp to attend the school which ended January 31, 1944 was good.

 

Returned to the company at Camp Manselton and instructed rest of Company. On two different occasions went to London with truckloads of other GIs. While there stayed in billets (British barracks) near the center of town, taking tours of London's landmarks: wax museum. Big Ben, Tower of London, Piccadilly Square, etc.

 

In April 44 went by train to Dorccester, England to prepare for maneuvers at Slapton Sands near Plymouth. While at the Dorchester Camp, about half of the company came down with food poisoning. We had trouble getting medical attention from the Camp doctor and finally our own doctor, Captain Accettiola gave us the solution, paregoric.

From here went to Weymouth, our port of deportation, boarding the APA boats for 3 days waiting for orders to start the crossing. Because of the weather conditions (stormy and rough seas) the invasion had to be postponed from the 5th...A lot of seasickness prevailed.

At midnight when we were about 10 miles from shore we changed over to a LCT (Landing Craft Tank).

 

Among the men aboard were Seabees, engineers, first aid people, a folding plane (wings up), a jeep, and various equipment. Among our people on board were Lt. Allison (the officer), Dollar, McKenzie, Kiec, Lysfcer, McClure, Sgt. Earhardt and myself..and perhaps others from our company. The boat was guided by a Coxswain (British boats had 2 engines).

 

We were due to land on Omaha beach at Coleville-sur-mier about 1 o'clock June 6th. About 150 yards or so out, we were hit by 2 - 88 caliber shells, killing the Coxswain and crippling one of the engines. Someone filled in but the LCT ended up on a sand bar. The ramp was dropped and we started for shore, the water got deeper and we began the swimming. Managed to hang on to all my equipment; and the life belt (which we all had on) helped; this was about 9:00 AM. We were being fired on by different kinds of guns (at a distance). We ended up a short distance from where we were to land. First tried to dig in at the beach, but the pebbles and sand didn't work. About 30 feet from the dune line was a tank trap full of water.

 

On the way in one of my group wanted to test his life preserver while in the boat to see if it would inflate. It did. When he got in the water it inflated some more and began to choke him. Lt Allison punctured it with his pocket knife to deflate it. He made it to shore.

 

About this time, McKenzie got hit by shrapnel, but it went in through his backpack, mess kit injuring him in the back. Dollar and Lyster tried to get him on a boat leaving the beach, but no one would come in so had to bring him back in (further in). We put up markers on the beach for guidelines for incoming boats.

 

After swimming across the tank trap managed to reach some higher ground. It was here Lt. Allison and I ran across a Brigadier General (1 star) who ordered us to advance and take a pillbox. Already a great number of men had been killed trying to do so. Turning away, Lt. Allison said to me -- "One time I will disobey an order." We went back to our section and dug in for the night. Three of us, Lt. Allison, Dollar and I shared that foxhole (or bomb crater) for the night. Really, really rough, we were wet and shaking.

 

The Company came in the next day with equipment (bulldozers) and we-started clearing pathways on the beach (pushing aside all sorts of junked equipment and dead bodies) for trucks coming in. They needed room and a cleared path to drive on. It was here we cut down trees and branches to fill ditches of water so trucks and equipment could drive on. These tank traps had running water that the Germans used to keep them full.

 

On the second day, advanced some up a higher slope clearing the beach by going back and forth from that area. We were laying down mesh for vehicles to drive on, always replacing mesh as it became worn. At this time we were employed unloading the LCT's as they came in, also making roads to inland. Captain Clark and I met on the beach, both smoking. Each said to the other, "didn't know you smoked." If you weren't smoking before, most took it up. An abundance of cigarettes were there to use.

 

In the meantime, I found a ditch of sorts that I made do as a place to stay. Then from there fashioned a hut-like structure, others did the same. This went on for about 2 weeks or so. One of our tasks was to pick up the dead, with German prisoners picking up their own. Burial was in a nearby cemetery. Also built headquarters for "A" Company out of sand bags. We used cranes (Clark lift tractor cranes) to pick up 2 nets of supplies off each ducks on to waiting trucks. Two nets of supplies was a truckload. These supplies consisted of various equipment and supplies such a ammo, rations, gasoline, clothing, medical, etc. ,also telephone poles, signal wire and tires. In addition built secondary roads and built up damaged ones. It turned out to be a rather efficient operation on our part, which brought on a commendation from Headquarters. This commendation covered the assault landing, developing the beachhead, and maintaining the flow of supplies in sufficient quantities for the combat elements. At this time I headed up a group of engineers with bulldozers, graders, dump trucks, etc. in laying down a passable road from the beachhead to Coleville-sur-Mur.

{Nephew's notes: Otto told me that he drove a grader through a mine field to clear it. Men were getting legs blown off and killed. A single file was eventually cleared and men were going up slowly in single file. The grader cleared the mine field so that the men could go up faster and in double file. Mines were blowing up the tires as he drove the grader to clear the field.}

 

About this time, Ernest R. Cure, Paul Casanno and I took an unofficial leave and visited Paris which was now in Allied (American) hands but off limits. We went by truck and walked around to see different sights.

 

While there we were stopped by a Lt. Adams and cited for being in an off-limit area. By doing some fast-talking I convinced him we were "red ball" truck drivers. Close call!

 

We remained on or near the beachhead for about 3 months. Because of the effective efforts of the battalion we were transferred to the Arramanahes area to move efficiently more supplies there. While here, Lyster and I with the help of other men plus qualified German prisoners, repaired and cleaned up a Chateau to use for recreational activities. Russians also were soldiers in the German Army and these and other prisoners appreciated the different attitudes and treatments of American GI's in comparison to the way the British had and were treating them. (Hence the red service ribbon from a Russian prisoner in my scrapbook).

 

This was around the first of November, 1944.

While here, the Americans and others were asked to participate in several parades held in the nearby town of Bayeux. We were picked out of Co. "A" to march in the American group in a French Holiday one.

 

I was picked from the 1st Platoon to do so; my position was in the front right line. Also was in a later Armistice Day parade in the same Town. The work at the Chateau was almost completed but didn't get to use it for about this time orders came to move out to Cherboug. We took our living quarters with us -- tents, lumber, floors, etc. While here we worked on the docks, unloading supplies from ships to railcars to go by rail to the now advancing combat lines. We had shifts of eleven hours with 1 hour off for mechanics to repair the machines--12 hours off and 12 hours on. This was around the very last of November and into December. A prisoner war camp was nearby and we put them to work along side us on the docks. Germans were not allowed to handle munitions and weapons. I acted as interpreter and boss.

 

The Germans launched a counter attack around the middle of December catching the lulled allies by surprise. This was a massive operation putting a lot of our forces in jeopardy. Known as the Battle of the Bulge, it cost many men their lives on both sides. Like the rest, we were alerted and movement came about. From Cherboug we went to an area around Leige. On one occasion at a chateau in Banneux a P-47 shot down a German Focke Wulf 190 which crashed in our vicinity. The pilot bailed out, horribly burned and begged to be shot; he was taken to a nearby hospital.

At this time, part of Co. A was separated. I became a T/4 with specialty duties. One was to attend a radio operator's school at Spa, Belgium, a few miles from the front (we could hear the guns). Our orders came through on December 31, 1944. From the 348th the following men, besides myself, were Bryan,.Bickastaff, Jr. Mattison, De Mardo and Valentine, Jr. were sent to the school. (Photos from place, men and locale in scrapbook are available). The school was held in a big 4 story house located on a hill overlooking Spa (a resort and bathhouse). The German word for hot bath house was °badº spa. An old picture of one on a postcard is in scrapbook. It was snowing on and off all this time; skiing took place here in peace time. On the road in picture, we walked about a mile to mess hall which was near the school; I went up to 21 words a minute, Keith to 24. In one photo, I posed with a machine gun+#8212;but back to Co. and a rifle.

After returning to Co., Lt. Wilson, a driver and I were stationed in a tall tower at Ramouchamps. This was in a chateau owned and occupied by a Doctor and his wife (they were well off). We supplied his Wife with "C" rations which she made into good meals, which were shared with us at their table. This was good while it lasted. Rest of 2 nd Platoon used this building (in photo, available) for living and eating cafe meals. This town was located near Leige, Belgium. There was a bridge crossing the river and dynamite charges were attached under the bridge ready to blow should the Germans advance at this time. However this proved unnecessary.

 

While at the radio school at Spa rest of 2nd Platoon served as road blocks at A Wallie, Belgium, the latter being between Leige and Malmedy.

The Co. after moving up through different places ended up at Aachen, a border town of Germany. After the capture of Aachen by Americans, we followed up to clean out booby traps, mines and to make roads serviceable. From here we went to Duren, Germany, and it was here the Co built a bridge (H-10) over the Roer River. This was performed by "A" Co. which brought a commendation from Major Powell on a job well done. My job was still in the radio field and surveillance

We were due to cross the River Rhine at Cologne which was in American hands. It was here while on surveillance Captain Cummings (an intelligence officer) was hit by combat fire from across the river by the Germans. Sgt. Holt went to help him and was killed. Captain Cummings was replaced by Captain Clark and he in turn was replaced by Lt. Turner. The front advance then changed from crossing here and went south down to Remagen. A lot of the Main Forces crossed before it was blown by the Germans. By the time we arrived at this locale we had to cross on a pontoon bridge already in place on the Rhine.

 

Next came the Ruhr pocket (as it was known) where the Germans were putting up stiff resistance. We followed the main forces buildingand repairing roads, and what needed to be done. One incident in Germany, probably during the Ruhr pocket. It was on a muddy dirt road the moving tanks were bogging down. As each of the tanks passed, multitudes of GIs were kept busy shoveling dirt in the tracks, only for the same "bogging down" occurred by the following tank. Word came to Lt. Wilson to do something to solve this slow down of the essential movements of the tanks. I said to him "assign me three men and I will solve the problem". I positioned one man on each side and the third in the middle. They directed the tanks to alternate their route and by filling the tracks as each passed the road soon became packed. The movement of the tanks was thus moving without bogging down.

 

Coming next to the Elbe River vicinity, we were in the area of Buckholz (near Hamberg). The Co. was attached to the 9th Army (82nd Airborne) which was preparing to cross the Elbe River. Resistance was not as fierce as expected and the crossing was made by floating vehicles across on barges. Later a pontoon bridge was built by us. Radio was used to direct movement of troops and equipment on the shore. I was on this operation. Also a foot bridge was built where some infantry crossed over at night.

From the crossing of the Elbe we came to Darchau and Lubtheen. After mopping up the ferrying and other activities that was involved in the crossing of the Elbe, Co. "A" moved to Lubtheen. Near Luduaghist there was a small Concentration Camp. The German prison guards had left by now; resistance was almost over. Our task was to transport the near dead to a hospital, which tried to keep them alive. They were in horrible shape because of starvation by the guards. Some of the food fed them (such as it was) consisted of "big cow red beets" They had been thrown over the fence but weakness kept them from reaching them. Of the 200 families of Ludwiglust, each was assigned a body to be buried including those that had been buried in a mass grave. They were to bury the bodies in a cemetery in the middle of town with white crosses on each.

 

Still in Lubtheen we were called on to stand inspection. My rifle was in a trailer pulled by a weapons carrier that Lt. Allison and I were using to contact towns for future housing. Needless to say, that rifle hadn+#8217;t been touched since the beach and I was carrying a carbine instead. Needless to say, failed to meet inspection as well as "umpteen" others and we were "gigged". Our punishment was to dig a hole 6 ft X 6 ft X 6 ft, me in charge. We were about half way down when Lt. Mullins came up to me for duties of a German spokesman. He was informed by me that I couldn't speak it. He stated he knew I could and left in a huff but not before he informed me I had to clean the rifle and stand inspection that day. I informed him that rules state only one inspection per day. He returned to still request my assistance. I told him I had forgotten to speak the German since I was on that detail. He said -- "No inspection, etc." and I left with him after having my say.

 

Another time Colonel Powell called me up about the pistol I was carrying. I had made a shoulder holster and was carrying it under my heavy field jacket. He said only Officers could carry pistols. I told him I was having to go into German towns requesting housing and I had to have it for protection. He agreed and I kept carrying it.

 

As Americans, we didn't just go into a town and demand; I was usually sent ahead where I hunted up the Chief of Police (buergmeister) and arranged for quarters. The people moved out because we were not allowed to fraternize (stay in same dwelling). Leaving Lubtheen, we all ended up in Seasen. While here a group of us stayed in an unoccupied house owned by a lady.

 

Some others thinking they needed a mattress took one from the- house we were staying in At the lady's request, I arranged for the return of the mattress. Grateful, she gave me a little embroidered painting in a small oval black frame. It is hanging on our den wall. I moved out of this house into a hotel-like structure that was occupied by several German citizens including a Frau Kutzner. These people moved out but returned during daytime hours to keep up the place. I moved in and lived there and dispensed beer to the GIs. This beer came from a brewery across the street which was in operation due to the malt the Army supplied in exchange for half its production.

Pettit and I used some motorcycles (which we had taken from German GIs) and used them for checking around for possible quarters. The Germans at this time were not headed back toward the eastern area but west. They did not want anything to do with the Russians. My main duties consisted of contacting the buergmeister in each town for places (houses) to stay and also recreation activities. I was accompanied by Lt. Allison and some by Lt. Mullins. Around this time Lt. Wilson and I made contacts with leather people to come up with the Ram's head ensignia. (Bryan had already designed the basic shape). Plastic pins with the ram+#8217;s head in color on it were produced for the Co. It was souvenir time -- elephant stuff, etc. All during the month of June the battalion was shunted from town to town and back tracked time after time (hence the name "autobahn campaign). One of the places we were at was Brunswick, home of a large airstrip which was full of planes. A large number of German planes that the pilots had flown in after the armistice. One was an American P-47 which ended up in an upside down position.

After a period of utter confusing and conflicting orders the Co. ended up in a town close to Frankfurt. It was during this time, possibly for as little as 3 days, I stayed in a large dance hall structure where I showed some movies to GIs. One of the owners, Mr. Beck, as I was leaving, ran out and gave me his picture.

Left the 348th around the last of June and was attached to the 2832nd at.Manaheim.for the purpose of coming home (I had enough points) but this did not happen.

Again I was transferred to 2832 Combat Battalion stationed at Neiderhausen, a small farming town (near Frankfurt).

The farmers in this town would take their horses, cows and equipment out to their little plots of farm land and grow crops. On Saturday mornings everyone would gather with brooms and sweep the streets clean. I was here about a week or two staying in a house with other GIs.

We boarded trucks here and drove straight through to a Camp near LeHarve, France (non-stop). This Camp was one of several "cigarette" camps -- never quite getting to board a ship.

One day they marched us up on the docks where the Queen Mary was docked. But we were stopped and a bunch of WACS marched right in front of us -- ended up in New York.

Then we (poor GIs) were boarded on a Liberty ship to South Hampton, England. Then a period of disgusting moves finally the USS Thomas Hyde, October 4, 1945; took 6 days and landed at Boston, Mass. By train to Camp Miles Standish again by train to Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Discharged at Dodge Field after three days. Received honorable discharge 10:30 AM Tuesday noon, October 23, 1945.

A civilian! Home to my Wife after two long years.

Signed by Otto G. Stamman

Army Serial Number 38035124

Compiled by Gladys Stamman January 1998

 

Otto G Stamman,

September 28, 1944

Age 25

Paris, France

 

Otto G Stamman

1996 at age 77

Now residing at 3602 Iroquois, Temple, Tx. 76504-5037

Now 82 years of age.

 

------------------------

 

Here are the links so far:

 

http://www.army.mil/cmh/reference/Normandy/TS/COE/COE15.htm

 

http://www.hbo.com/apps/band/site/client/stories/curated_story.jsp?exid=317

 

http://users.skynet.be/jeeper/page92.html

 

http://www.ddaymuseum.org/education/history_dday.html

 

http://members.aol.com/famjustin/oralinfo.html

 

http://www.behindthebadge.net/bloodstripes/memory/mem_h.html

 

http://www.military-network.com/ben/Associations_Detail.cfm?ID=2085

 

http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/ETO/Admin/ETO-AdmLog-6/ETO-AdmLog-6-7.html

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~neplatte/wwii.html

 

http://www.lstmemorial.org/wayitwas.htm

 

http://www.antonnews.com/portwashingtonnews/1999/05/21/news/

Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#3

Received this lovely letter from Sandra this morning. Seems the party was a huge success. I am also including some photos that she sent.

 

Happy birthday Frank! Many more and continued health and success from all of us!

 

----------------

Dear Stefano, Christine, Marc, Dick, Josh, Mary, Marion and Michael!

 

All of you, primarily, along with so many others, contributed so very much to my husband's 85th surprise birthday party! My heart, and with it my love, goes out to you all. I am overwhelmed with such love and gratitude and I wish you could all get to know one another, as I, through this wonderful e-mail, have gotten to know you, for you all have a strong similarity, honesty, integrity, sincerity and love for your fellow man (well, women too!!!) and family, and the most overwhelming respect for those courageous people that fought, so very, very many giving their lives, in the name of freedom and liberation from such oppressive tyranny. You are all worldwide, and I, as a humble individual, salute you all for I am truly blessed and grateful for the privilege of touching you.

 

I wish you all would e-mail each other. Stefano is in Livorno, Italy; Christine is in Germany, Marc is in Holland, Dick (Frank's former commanding officer) is in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Josh is in South Dakota, Mary is the e-mail liason for Bill Klick (Frank's old army buddy), Marion is in Michigan and Michael is in Washington, DC (Historian for the Army Corps of Engineers).

 

If I had any of your permissions, I would e-mail some of their letters to you.

 

Some of these pictures are a little dark (those are the ones I took!), the other ones are pretty clear (those are the ones my daughter, Lisa, took!). It all got a little blurred when the VFW (Veterans of Foreign Wars) presented Frank with the folded flag that our Congresswoman Mary Bono had flown before the Capitol on June 6, 2005 in honor of Frank Donia, and they read the Citation she had sent. It says, in part:

 

"This flag was flown for Frank Donia, in sincere gratitude for your honorable and courageous defense of the United States of America and freedom for all during the landing at Normandy on June 6, 1944. On behalf of a grateful nation, We Salute You."

 

I love you with a special feeling that will never end, only beginning to grow. Let's please stay in touch, my friends!!!

 

Just realized that "I" have spent faaarrrr tooooo much time referring to meeeeeee. . .!!!

 

Love,

Sandra

 

----------

Sandra is on the right

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Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#4

Frank is on left

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Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#5

Sandra's daughter Lisa and Frank. What a happy photo!

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Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#6

VFW Lodge Commander reading Citation from Congresswoman Mary Bono regarding the flag

post-3-1120768291_thumb.jpg



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Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#7

The salute

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Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#8

Frank with his presented flag

post-3-1120768433_thumb.jpg



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Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#9

Frank lost in thought. I wonder what was going through his head at this precise moment. -_-

post-3-1120768507_thumb.jpg



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Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#10

Frank and fellow vet

post-3-1120768608_thumb.jpg



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Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply


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