Something to Think about and Remember
#1

:14_2_108:

 

 

Found these old photos I thought I had lost. Will give you something to think about

 

 

GIsviewamassgrave.jpg

 

 

 

 

MyMilitaryPhotos.jpg

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#2

Your title is so right Leo and we will go on remembering. Unfortunately the killing never stops and I suppose never will. All we can do is hope that those who lose their lives in conflicts will never be forgotten.

All of us here try to make sure of that!

 

Colin.

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#3

Tragic, I didn't expect to see these kind of pictures here but it's good to have them and to share them so other people can see what happened. I hope this will never happen again but I am afraid it's still going on in different countries all over the world.

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#4
Yes, thank you for posting those. We need CONSTANT reminders, for the human race is guilty of pushing these aside; sometimes intentionally, sometimes not...
Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
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#5

Powerful photographs Sgt. Leo, and I echo the remarks of the previous posters about it still happening today in places like Afrika, Indonesia, and (most likely) North Korea, just to name a few. I cannot imagine what an impact scenes like this must have made on you (and other Allied soldiers) to experience as a young man.

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#6

Powerful photographs Sgt. Leo, and I echo the remarks of the previous posters about it still happening today in places like Afrika, Indonesia, and (most likely) North Korea, just to name a few. I cannot imagine what an impact scenes like this must have made on you (and other Allied soldiers) to experience as a young man.

 

Pardon me if I correct you but I was actually still a kid less than 2 years out of High School. But man-o-man did I ever age quickly with events like this.

 

I remember one Kraut I hit in the leg because he was alone and I figured that way he'd go to the POW camp. After interrogating, him I found out he was only 13 and crying like a baby. That made me feel terrible until I remembered he was trying to kill one of us!!!

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#7

I think we sometimes forget how young you boys were when you went to war. The things you must have seen and heard unimaginable to ones that have never been exposed to the likes of the pictures you've posted. We've seen funny things and interesting things here to make us laugh and ponder, but when we see something such as you've posted it makes us dig a little digger into our feelings.

 

Thank you for the reminder that there is ugliness out there, and thank you for people like you that made it so people like me never had to see something like this other then in a picture.

 

Good day to you Sgt. Leo.

 

Nancy

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#8

Thank You Sarge, the reminders are not only of what happened, but also of why we are here.

Now almost 70 years after the war, they are still uncovering evidence:

 

from BBC News Europe:

Nazi-era graves to be dug up in Austria

 

another link with the story:

Nazi-Era Graves Found Near Austrian Psych Ward

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#9

Pardon me if I correct you but I was actually still a kid less than 2 years out of High School. But man-o-man did I ever age quickly with events like this.

 

Dear Sarge,

I took the liberty of upgrading your status to 'young man' because of what I figured you had seen of the war already, before seeing the death camps in '45. :14_2_108:

 

Respectfully,

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#10

My father was 21 when he was inducted into the service in 1942. I've learned my love of country and appreciation for those who serve from him.

 

I've always known, of course, that my dad was really just a boy when he went into the service, but it was really brought home to me when my son's National Guard unit was preparing to go to Afghanistan. I looked at those soldiers and they seemed like such babies to me, and I couldn't fathom how anyone could think of sending those babies into a war zone (yes, the same thought as millions of mothers and fathers throughout the ages) and I wondered how on Earth they could stand it because they seemed so young. They did, of course, like the true soldiers they are, but it gave me an entirely new appreciation of my father and how young he was to have faced all he faced.

 

My father was present at the liberation of Bergen-Belsen and he allowed me to write an article about it for our local newspaper. He hates to speak of it, as you can imagine, but he did it for me because I told him it is so important to record stories like his. He said it still haunts him, not just the bodies, but also the living. He said he can still see them falling and kissing their feet or of them trying to get away from the camp and just dropping in their tracks because they didn't have the strength to go on.

 

Unfortunately, these things do still go on and there are those who would deny history (Ahmadinejad) so reminders such as these are so important.

 

Thank you, Sgt. Leo, for posting them. And thank you for your service, I am so grateful to you and all of our veterans....(But there is a special place in my heart our WWII boys...)

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