Veterans at the V.A.
#1

I've been going to the VA this week to pick up records and get medicines and stuff for my grandpa. Every time I go the place is packed full of vets going to and fro. I saw some interesting hats today, several WWII guys, Vietnam, Desert Storm. But what got to me the most is how nice the veterans are. When I'm standing in line or waiting on something which is always the case they are so friendly and sweet, it always makes the wait easier.

 

I had to pick up my uncle today because he was admitted on Monday, he was so displeased with the quality of care he received there these last three days or should I say lack thereof, and at the end of his rant, he says, "That's a heck of a way to treat veterans!" I thought about that kind old fella I met a few days ago with the 3rd Armorned patch on his cap, he kept me company while I was waiting on the medical records guy to come back to his office. The clerk said "Oh, that's Mr. Allen, he'll talk your ear off if you let him." and I'm like that's fine with me!

 

...and the gray haired Vietnam vet who gave his prostate to the Repbulic of Veitnam (this one happens to be my uncle). Yeah it is a heck of a way to treat veterans, I wish they appreciated these men like we do here on the forum . Hell I wish everyone appreciated our veterans like we do here on the forum.

 

Sometimes I feel just like Ernie Pyle in "Brave Men", he said I'm a rabid one-man movement bent on tracking down and stamping out everybody in the world who doesn't fully appreciate the common front-line soldier.

:14_6_3:

Reply
#2

Thank you for the above article. This has made my day and then some.

I go to the V.A. Medical Center here in K. C. and I have been treated

very,very, well. And you are right, there is allways a million vets there

every day. No where to park but I haven't heard any compaints. Little story--

Last time I went,(2weeks ago), I was sitting waiting my turn and behind me was

a Vietnam Vet. He saw my cap, it says "34th Infantry Divn. WW 11" All he said

I have a pin that I am going to give you, It said WW 11 Veteran and had a flag

and theArmy Banner on it. I was speechless I stood up and shook his hand

and just said, THANK YOU VERY MUCH. Makes life worth living.

Just got an E-Mail today that another RED BULL passed away last night.

Roque,Lifetime member, 34th Divn. Assn.

Reply
#3

It's a CRIME, a SIN, and should be a National SHAME whenever any of our Veterans do not get good care!!

 

I'm very sorry Brooke that your Uncle didn't receive the kind of care he DESERVES. It's DISGRACEFUL :armata_PDT_19: .

 

I think we all need to get more involved in our local veteran's facilities.

The local VA Healthcare center is in West Roxbury and my mother crocheted an untold number of blankets for the vets there - but there's a whole lot of other things things that they need or things people can volunteer to do.

 

My cousin Maryann (we're really like sisters) is having her 70th bday this year & has announced to her family that she wants no gifts, no party - she intends

to spend the day as a volunteer & I'm recommending that we do something for the West Roxbury VA Hospital. So far - she & I are the only ones who've "signed up" , but I'll see if I can "browbeat" some more "recruits" at Easter dinner. Maryann is so beautiful, so funny & loving, such a ray of sunshine,

and she's also the QUEEN of chatterboxes so, though they may not get a word in edgewise - at least the Vets would be entertained. :D

 

Here's an article that was in our local paper that gives you alot of good ideas about what you can volunteer to do or donate. It is wonderful also to see how many local school kids are visiting our veterans. Get the # of your local VA Hospital & ask em what they need.

 

http://www.dailynewstranscript.com/archive/x852316066

 

m2

Reply
#4

Volunteering at the VA facility is a great opportunity to brighten the day of the residents who live there. In my visits of late there are many volunteers there during the day runnig about and helping people. They are indeed a blessing and there fulfilling a great need.

 

I live in the Appalachia. I don't know if many of you saw that special on abc a few weeks ago about the forgotten children of Appalachia w/Diane Sawyer. Although that town was in Kentucky it isn't far off the mark for cities and towns only short drive from here. This place was a booming industrial spot in the latter part of the 1800's up to the 1940's. The mines employed thousands of people and when the coal was mined out, the people and towns were abandoned. Some left to pursue employment elsewhere, some didn't. As the years dragged on, the poorer the communites became. Without the mining revenue to support them, they fell to disrepar and neglect.

 

Southern Appalachia is one of if not THE poorest region in America. Do a google search for rural appalachia and look at the images. This is where I live. Not many career professionals want to live here, which in my opinion is why our health care is second rate, not just the VA facility. The schools here are limited, opportunities available in bigger cities just flat out do not exist here. WV has a high welfare rate, obesity, teenage pregnancies, and drug abuse. We are hours away from quality care and when you are disabled or otherwise incapaciated, hours might as well be light years. WV has one of the highest percents of military service people, the military provides opportunities that just aren't available here.

 

Since WV has had a high rate of military service members, logically it has loads of veterans who live in these tiny no name places that now need care and their needs just aren't being fulfilled adequately. Three nurses in the VA told my uncle to "get out of this system, NOW", when the people who work there tell you that there is something terribly wrong.

 

I hope this facility is not representing the VA Healtcare system as a whole, but for these local men it IS their whole healthcare and they deserve better, every one deserves better.

 

After working here and there in the mines and a brief stay in Newark, my grandfather was fortunate enough to get on with a Elkem Metals / Union Carbide in the 1960's. It was demanding and dangerous work, but a good, honest living. My uncles and aunt moved away only to come back later because of the desire to be with family. Appalachian people are notoriously family oriented and deeply patriotic. Unfortuneatly they are very resistant to change and suspicious of anyone who comes along and tries to "make this a better place".

 

I'm still here because of my family. I try not to let the goings on bring me down. A long time ago (benefit of being an only child) I learned to depend on myself for entertainment. I pursue my own interestes that are quite different from others my age here and the older I get the less I care about fitting in with those around me.

 

I'll get off my soap box and hope no one strikes me with a rotten tomato. :walk:

Reply
#5

Volunteering at the VA facility is a great opportunity to brighten the day of the residents who live there. In my visits of late there are many volunteers there during the day runnig about and helping people. They are indeed a blessing and there fulfilling a great need.

 

I live in the Appalachia. I don't know if many of you saw that special on abc a few weeks ago about the forgotten children of Appalachia w/Diane Sawyer. Although that town was in Kentucky it isn't far off the mark for cities and towns only short drive from here. This place was a booming industrial spot in the latter part of the 1800's up to the 1940's. The mines employed thousands of people and when the coal was mined out, the people and towns were abandoned. Some left to pursue employment elsewhere, some didn't. As the years dragged on, the poorer the communites became. Without the mining revenue to support them, they fell to disrepar and neglect.

 

Southern Appalachia is one of if not THE poorest region in America. Do a google search for rural appalachia and look at the images. This is where I live. Not many career professionals want to live here, which in my opinion is why our health care is second rate, not just the VA facility. The schools here are limited, opportunities available in bigger cities just flat out do not exist here. WV has a high welfare rate, obesity, teenage pregnancies, and drug abuse. We are hours away from quality care and when you are disabled or otherwise incapaciated, hours might as well be light years. WV has one of the highest percents of military service people, the military provides opportunities that just aren't available here.

 

Since WV has had a high rate of military service members, logically it has loads of veterans who live in these tiny no name places that now need care and their needs just aren't being fulfilled adequately. Three nurses in the VA told my uncle to "get out of this system, NOW", when the people who work there tell you that there is something terribly wrong.

 

I hope this facility is not representing the VA Healtcare system as a whole, but for these local men it IS their whole healthcare and they deserve better, every one deserves better.

 

After working here and there in the mines and a brief stay in Newark, my grandfather was fortunate enough to get on with a Elkem Metals / Union Carbide in the 1960's. It was demanding and dangerous work, but a good, honest living. My uncles and aunt moved away only to come back later because of the desire to be with family. Appalachian people are notoriously family oriented and deeply patriotic. Unfortuneatly they are very resistant to change and suspicious of anyone who comes along and tries to "make this a better place".

 

I'm still here because of my family. I try not to let the goings on bring me down. A long time ago (benefit of being an only child) I learned to depend on myself for entertainment. I pursue my own interestes that are quite different from others my age here and the older I get the less I care about fitting in with those around me.

 

I'll get off my soap box and hope no one strikes me with a rotten tomato. :walk:

 

 

I FORONE LOVED YOUR ARTICLE. YOU EXPRESS YOURSELF BEAUTIFULLY.

I HAD TO READ IT TWICE. ROCKY

Reply
#6

Thanks Rocky, you're the best!!

 

((Hugs))

 

Brooke

Reply
#7

Brooke,

 

By depending on yourself and being there for your family (among many other things)- you surely have developed a rich interior life. It's therefore natural that your interests would be different from others your age (you most likely have surpassed them by leaps & bounds). The strength you've been developing will stand you in good stead for all your life.

 

You are a STELLAR :clappin: person, Brooke & it shows!

 

No "rotten tomatoes" for you - only cheers :pdt34::clappin:

 

m2

Reply


Possibly Related Threads…
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Helpful links for all veterans Walt's Daughter 0 5,357 03-25-2015, 11:00 AM
Last Post: Walt's Daughter
  VA administers the Veterans Choice Program Walt's Daughter 0 1,757 11-19-2014, 07:59 AM
Last Post: Walt's Daughter
  Veterans Day 2011 Walt's Daughter 9 5,176 11-14-2011, 11:39 AM
Last Post: CaptO
  Importance of Giving Veterans a Voice Walt's Daughter 2 3,429 01-29-2011, 10:10 AM
Last Post: Walt's Daughter
  Benefits for Survivors of Veterans Walt's Daughter 2 3,491 08-03-2010, 10:09 PM
Last Post: Walt's Daughter
  Aging veterans unaware of VA pension benefits Walt's Daughter 0 12,109 05-23-2010, 10:39 AM
Last Post: Walt's Daughter
  Veterans - assistance with interview project Walt's Daughter 0 2,452 02-05-2010, 05:57 PM
Last Post: Walt's Daughter
  Fraud Hits Disabled Veterans Walt's Daughter 0 2,631 11-25-2009, 05:23 PM
Last Post: Walt's Daughter
  Veterans Day ... Remember sixgun 8 5,199 11-19-2009, 07:01 PM
Last Post: Walt's Daughter
  Victory for Veterans Walt's Daughter 0 2,398 10-23-2009, 06:18 PM
Last Post: Walt's Daughter



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)