quarter master baking company
#1

we are from the netherlands

and my wife's father was an gi in ww2.

his unit was a quarter master baking company the 3023th

we are looking for the hystory of this unit or baking units

can you help us to find information

we thank you all very much

andre and maggy

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#2

Dear Andre and Maggie:

 

So pleased to have both of you here. Will see what we can find out about baking companies. It will be a very good question too, because smaller units such as this one, are pretty tough to get info for. Plus, it will give our readers a better feel for ALL the units involved during the war. These GUYS did everything, and their was a special unit for everything you can think of during the war. They are played an important role and made everything come together and work!

 

:armata_PDT_37:

Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
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#3

I've only just begun, but found this reference on someone's family tree website. Looks like one of their relatives was a member of that same unit. Here is there website and here is the entry:

 

http://www.ferristree.com/peter.htm

 

(2.1.1.1.4.9.1.1.1.2) FRANCIS W. STEWART, JR., (Sonny) born July 10, 1923 Sharpsville PA and died there January 12, 1988; buried Clark Citizens Cemetery. WWII Vet serving in the 3023d Quartermaster Bakery Company in Germany. He married first Miss Seidel and they had 1 kid; married second Dolores Glover and they had 1 kid; married third Dolores Klingensmith.

 

I don't know if they would have any other info, but at least it's a start. I will keep looking...

Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#4

I've only just begun, but found this reference on someone's family tree website. Looks like one of their relatives was a member of that same unit. Here is there website and here is the entry:

 

http://www.ferristree.com/peter.htm

 

(2.1.1.1.4.9.1.1.1.2) FRANCIS W. STEWART, JR., (Sonny) born July 10, 1923 Sharpsville PA and died there January 12, 1988; buried Clark Citizens Cemetery. WWII Vet serving in the 3023d Quartermaster Bakery Company in Germany. He married first Miss Seidel and they had 1 kid; married second Dolores Glover and they had 1 kid; married third Dolores Klingensmith.

 

I don't know if they would have any other info, but at least it's a start. I will keep looking...

 

sorry for my late answer but i work a lot as a butcher for restaurants ok

yes we find that to about stewart, but thats all we can find and thank you for your reply

Reply
#5

Oh no need to apologize for the delay of your reply. We are not punching a time clock here! :lol: Post and reply when you can. That is what's so nice about the internet; you can get around to things when you find the time. I DO like that.

 

Yes, it appears this is going to be a tough one. You may want to contact my buddy Richard Horrell. He does private research and has thousands of books in his collection. He has been able to help many people. Here's his website:

 

http://www.ww2connections.com/

Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#6

Oh no need to apologize for the delay of your reply. We are not punching a time clock here! :lol: Post and reply when you can. That is what's so nice about the internet; you can get around to things when you find the time. I DO like that.

 

Yes, it appears this is going to be a tough one. You may want to contact my buddy Richard Horrell. He does private research and has thousands of books in his collection. He has been able to help many people. Here's his website:

 

http://www.ww2connections.com/

 

yes marion this men offerd his help, about maggy;s father and guess what,

probebly he was in the 244th engineer combat bn

for sure he was not in that bakery company, with that unit he3 only came home

he was in the 447th ord. HAM Co. apo 339 us army, because we found a picture with that on.

but we think untill now that, that unit belong with the 244th engineer co ba, but we must know if that is a fact and if the 244th was in holland at that time, end of 1944.

yes mr horrell is very good in his work, thank you all for helping us further, but we come back if we know more

andre and maggy

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#7

The 244th didn't reach England until November of 1944, so therefore they could not have taken part of Operation Market Garden. They sailed for France the third week of December 1944.

 

 

On 22 Oct 44, the battalion received its orders for deployment, the next day, it was on a troop train to an unknown destination. When the unit arrived at Camp Kilmer, NJ, the main Port of Embarkation for the ETO, the GIs has their first clue as to their destination. On 29 Oct 44, the battalion set sail in a convoy on the S.S. Explorer. The EM were assigned bunks, stacked four high, and all members were given instructions for procedures in the event of aerial or submarine attack. The men kept their thoughts to themselves as the Statue of Liberty grew smaller in the distance.

 

The first few days of the crossing were uneventful, and then powerful winds began buffeting the sea and, of course, the ship. Fish were fed quite well until the men learned not to eat in these conditions. The battalion gratefully landed at Avonmouth, England 10 Nov 44. Combat training began on an accelerated schedule. PT, drill (the staple of military training), mines and booby traps, machinegun drills and long, longer, and longest hikes were all part of the training. LTC Stevenson was relieved of command – well aware of his reputation, he had expressed some reservations concerning his safety en route – and a temporary CO, Maj. Freij, took over. The Battle of the Bulge broke 16 Dec 44 and the battalion was slated as reinforcements.

 

This change of leadership disrupted the plans that SHAEF had for the deployment of the 244th. The battalion languished in England while reports were generated and a suitable CO was located. While significant to the battalion, this series of events, when compared to the fluid, confusing and explosive situation in the Ardennes for the totally unprepared SHAEF was of little significance to them. Major Thomas Bowen, who had been XO, was promoted to LTC and took command of the battalion. It wasn’t until 24 Dec 44 that the battalion sailed for France and the ETO, arriving on Christmas in the early evening. The men nervously noted the numerous mines floating in the water. Little did the battalion know, nor did anyone else, that at 1800 hours, the S.S.Leopoldville, carrying troops from the 66th Infantry Division, would be torpedoed just off the French coast, following the 244th’s route. Nearly 900 officers and EM were lost, as the civilian crew abandoned ship, without giving instructions, radioing for assistance or lowering lifeboats. No one was wearing life belts on the doomed vessel nor was anyone in the 244th.

Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
Reply
#8

The 244th didn't reach England until November of 1944, so therefore they could not have taken part of Operation Market Garden. They sailed for France the third week of December 1944.

On 22 Oct 44, the battalion received its orders for deployment, the next day, it was on a troop train to an unknown destination. When the unit arrived at Camp Kilmer, NJ, the main Port of Embarkation for the ETO, the GIs has their first clue as to their destination. On 29 Oct 44, the battalion set sail in a convoy on the S.S. Explorer. The EM were assigned bunks, stacked four high, and all members were given instructions for procedures in the event of aerial or submarine attack. The men kept their thoughts to themselves as the Statue of Liberty grew smaller in the distance.

 

The first few days of the crossing were uneventful, and then powerful winds began buffeting the sea and, of course, the ship. Fish were fed quite well until the men learned not to eat in these conditions. The battalion gratefully landed at Avonmouth, England 10 Nov 44. Combat training began on an accelerated schedule. PT, drill (the staple of military training), mines and booby traps, machinegun drills and long, longer, and longest hikes were all part of the training. LTC Stevenson was relieved of command – well aware of his reputation, he had expressed some reservations concerning his safety en route – and a temporary CO, Maj. Freij, took over. The Battle of the Bulge broke 16 Dec 44 and the battalion was slated as reinforcements.

 

This change of leadership disrupted the plans that SHAEF had for the deployment of the 244th. The battalion languished in England while reports were generated and a suitable CO was located. While significant to the battalion, this series of events, when compared to the fluid, confusing and explosive situation in the Ardennes for the totally unprepared SHAEF was of little significance to them. Major Thomas Bowen, who had been XO, was promoted to LTC and took command of the battalion. It wasn’t until 24 Dec 44 that the battalion sailed for France and the ETO, arriving on Christmas in the early evening. The men nervously noted the numerous mines floating in the water. Little did the battalion know, nor did anyone else, that at 1800 hours, the S.S.Leopoldville, carrying troops from the 66th Infantry Division, would be torpedoed just off the French coast, following the 244th’s route. Nearly 900 officers and EM were lost, as the civilian crew abandoned ship, without giving instructions, radioing for assistance or lowering lifeboats. No one was wearing life belts on the doomed vessel nor was anyone in the 244th.

 

 

yes we found out that the 447th was not a part of 244th engineer

i think maggy's father unit the 447th Ordnance , was part of the S.O.S services of supply, BUT WE KNOW THAT SOON, FROM RICHARD HORRELL

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