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  1. Last week
  2. Glad you joined. I'm sure the more people who see your request, the better. Welcome to the forum. Hope we can help you.
  3. My name is Valentino Rossetti and I am the webmaster of the site dalvolturnoacassino.it . I have collaborated with Marion J. Chard in relation to the 1108th presence in Italy. I am conducting a research about a unit of German self-propelled guns that fought at Monte Porchia in the days between 3 and 8 January 1944 (just the days when the 48th companies were called to operate as infantry to give help to the conquest of this position). The German unit was named (in German) 2.Batterie SturmGeschutz Abteilung 242 and was equipped with 75 mm guns. There are some photographs that show some of these S.P. guns, hit or broken, taken January 9, 1944. The shooting location is generally referred to as "San Vittore area" but it is almost certain that it is near Monte Porchia (also included in the San Vittore area). Photo list: monte-porchia. Do you have any informations / photos that help me to identify the location of this unit in those days? Greetings and thanks for the help you can give me. Valentino
  4. Walt's Daughter

    info about 351st engineers general service

    We have quite a bit of info on this unit, right here on the forum. Please type in "351st" in the SEARCH box at the top of the home page of the forum. It will list any posts related to this unit.
  5. Walt's Daughter

    5th Engineer Special Brigade

    Well it looks like you are on your way Leslie.
  6. Walt's Daughter

    Introduction - 210th Military Police Company WWII

    Let me see what I can come up with for you.
  7. theron

    info about 351st engineers general service

    Hi.... You can find unit records: after action reports, message logs , aka unit journals etc. via. NARA.gov This following link will take you to a history: https://thefedorachronicles.com/worldwar2/mccarthy/SDOC0981.pdf
  8. Hello, I just joined today. I've been looking for information about the 351st engineers. My great-uncle was a member of the unit and information about him and this unit has been hard to find. I've lucked out so far discovering that this was his unit and I also found his serial number. His name was Earl Arnold and I believe he held the rank of Corporal. Any help would be great appreciated. I've included his picture in case anyone may have unit photos. Thanks!!!
  9. BCF

    5th Engineer Special Brigade

    Greetings Leslie, You are the first person with a family connection to the 210th that I've been able to connect with. Very happy that you posted. I have been collecting information on the Company for a while with the goal of assembling a simple book to follow my grandfather's time in the 210th. I'll assembly a summary and forward you a collection of documents in a couple of days. -Brice Freeman
  10. Hello, I am Leslie Krogh Feuerborn. My father, Ray Krogh, served in the 210th Military Police Company as a Private in WWII. He died when he was just 38 years old in a mountain climbing accident so our family wasn't able to find out any direct information about his experience in the war. Fortunately, his parents kept some of the letters that he sent home which has allowed us some insight into his experience. The 210th MP Company is not easy to find much information about so I'm hoping this site will help me out. He also served with Corporal Leslie E Haughs who died on December 25, 1944 and is buried at Henri-Chapelle Cemetery in Liège, Belgium. My dad thought so highly of Cpl Haughs that I was named after him (although I am female). I look forward to connecting with others through this site. Leslie
  11. Krogh Feuerborn

    5th Engineer Special Brigade

    BCF, my father was also in the 210th Military Police Company. I would love to hear more about what you have found about the activities of the 210th. I have some letters that my dad sent to his parents and have been able to find out some about the 210th on D-Day but don't know much about what they did and where they were after that. Can you share any of your information with me or tell me where you found information that I can go and search? Thanks. Leslie Krogh Feuerborn
  12. Walt's Daughter

    Interesting Articles

    Yes, I too read this and was going to post it. Glad one of us got around to it. Well, what can you say. He got to be with his sons, and other WWII veterans, then see the Memorial and exchange talk with the group. Truly, what a wonderful way to leave this earth.
  13. Earlier
  14. buk2112

    Interesting Articles

    Just saw this on Facebook, farewell Mr. Manchel NATIONAL Son tried to save his dad, a World War II vet, who died on Honor Flight to San Diego BY KAITLYN ALANIS MAY 07, 2019 03:33 PM, UPDATED MAY 07, 2019 03:33 PM World War II veteran Frank Manchel’s death on the Honor Flight was “almost instantaneous,” Honor Flight San Diego founder Dave Smith said, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune. “He was laughing, chatting, having a good time — and then he collapsed,” Smith said, according to the newspaper. Manchel’s son, a doctor, and another doctor went to help — and the two doctors gave him CPR for 12 minutes, the newspaper reported. “Resuscitation measures were taken but he could not be revived,” Honor Flight San Diego posted to Facebook. Honor Flight San Diego is a nonprofit that “takes heroes to Washington, D.C. to visit and reflect at their memorials at no cost to the veterans,” according to its Facebook page. “It is with our most deepest sympathy that we send our condolences to the Frank Manchel family,” the organization wrote. Manchel, 95, was a U.S. Army and World War II veteran, according to Honor Flight San Diego. When Manchel could not be revived, his body was draped in an American flag, according to the nonprofit. “It was our privilege to honor this true American hero during his final hours,” Honor Flight San Diego Chairman Julie Brightwell said, according to the Union-Tribune. While the plane began to land, people on board started singing “God Bless America” in honor of Manchel, the Union-Tribune reported. “Frank Manchel was so excited to go on Honor Flight. To be with both of his sons as well as his 93-year-old brother who met him in Washington, D.C. was so special,” his son, Bruce, said in the Facebook post. “My father’s passing was the ending to the most amazing weekend, surrounded by his newest best friends. “ ... Frank passed quickly and peacefully and the compassion and respect that that was shown to our family will be treasured always,” he continued. “May he rest in peace as he is now with his other beloved son Jimmy.” Honor Flight San Diego included a photo of Manchel on the American Airlines flight. The nonprofit says the photo was taken “just before he collapsed." American Airlines has since offered to fly Manchel and his family members to Michigan, where his body will be laid to rest, the post says. “We thank all of you – Honor Flight San Diego, American Airlines, San Diego International airport, friends, and supporters for your concern and for allowing the weekend to be so special for all of us to share together,” Bruce Manchel wrote. Six other people have died on Honor Flights, according to the Associated Press.
  15. Walt's Daughter

    1st Btn 358th Engineers

    It's very difficult to obtain info on one man within a unit. The best bet is to gather morning reports from NARA in St Louis, because this may give you some leads. You can also obtain unit records for the 358th from NARA in Maryland. Please see my instructions on how to obtain records here:
  16. Fluffy

    1st Btn 358th Engineers

    Hi, I am trying to find out what happened to 1st Lt Donald C. Grant, 0-1107445, of the 1st Btn 358th Engineers. Last heard of in 1944. Can anyone help?
  17. Walt's Daughter

    Exercise Tiger

    I appreciate you posting both of those. The images are very moving, especially the footprints in the sand.
  18. buk2112

    Exercise Tiger

    The U.S. government early on set the number of American Army and Navy servicemen killed and missing from Exercise Tiger at 749 total, and still maintains this figure today. The accuracy of the 749 number has been debated since the beginning. Many arguing that the real total is much higher and in some cases that the 749 figure is slightly inflated. No matter who's figure you go by the loss of life was tremendous, and the impact from this event was felt nowhere greater than by the State of Missouri. In the aftermath of this tragic event, 196 of Missouri's native sons were among the dead and missing. This is some 26% of the U.S. reported total figure of 749, far more than any other state. Why so many from one particular state? Most of the answer to this question can be found in the 3206th Quartermaster Service Company. The 3206th was nearly an all Missouri unit, comprising approximately 80% -85% of the company's 250 total enlisted men and officers. The 3206th suffered the second highest amount of casualties among the various units of Exercise Tiger, losing 201 of her 250 men that April night so long ago. The 3206th ceased to exist after this incident, no time to rebuild her ranks before the fast approaching D-Day landings, the survivors were simply folded into the 3207th QSC. Better late than never, as the old saying goes. In 1997 the State of Missouri finally decided it was time to place a memorial for her fallen sons lost to Exercise Tiger. The site chosen was the Audrain County Courthouse grounds of my hometown of Mexico, Missouri.. We had lost 8 men from the Audrain County area to Exercise Tiger, most in state, it was for this reason Mexico had been chosen as the site for the new memorial. Here are a few pics of the memorial: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexico,_Missouri https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audrain_County,_Missouri This is a photo of the Exercise Tiger Memorial in it's original compact setting on the northwest corner of the Audrain County Courthouse This is how it appears today. A few years ago it was decided to move the memorial to the northeast corner in a more prominent and much more attractive setting. The Exercise Tiger memorial is on the left, a Veteran's memorial to all Audrain County men lost in WWI,WWII,Korea and Vietnam is on the right, and in the middle is a real anchor from an LST on permanent loan from the U. S. Navy. All the names of the 196 Missouri men lost are in inscribed, with the 8 local men in larger type in the center. Plaque at the base of the memorial. A 75th anniversary commemorative service was held at the memorial Sunday. I will try and post more about that soon.
  19. Update after quite some time. My medals and citations request through the national archives was responded to a few months back and replacement medals will be issued! WWII Victory Medal American Campaign Medal European-african-middle eastern campaign medal American Defense Service Medal Unfortunately, the Silver Star still remains a mystery. I need to reference the National Archives letter to see how many campaign stars they are issuing on the replacement European-african-middle eastern campaign medal as well, since that was another discrepancy between the paperwork and the uniform. It seems like morning reports may be the best bet now!
  20. buk2112

    Exercise Tiger

    On this date 75 years ago, 749 American servicemen perished during Exercise Tiger, one in a series of dress rehearsals for the up coming D-Day landings. Let us remember them today for their service and sacrifice. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exercise_Tiger Exercise Tiger: Bootprints mark D-Day disaster 75th anniversary 28 April 2019 Share this with Facebook Share this with Messenger Share this with Twitter Share this with Email Share Related Topics D-Day Image copyrightPA Image captionBootprints have been laid in the sand in honour of the 749 servicemen who died on 28 April 1944 Hundreds of US servicemen who died in a World War Two disaster while rehearsing the D-Day landings are being remembered in an art installation. Bootprints of 749 troops have been laid out on Slapton Sands, Devon, to mark the 75th anniversary of Exercise Tiger. The men died when convoys training for the Normandy Landings were attacked by German E-Boats off the Devon coast. Artist Martin Barraud hopes the artwork will help raise money for employment projects for veterans. Mr Barraud also designed last year's There But Not There campaign, which placed silhouettes of "Tommy" troops across the UK, to mark the centenary of the end of World War One. "Our Tommy campaign captured the hearts of the nation, whilst giving a substantial boost to the mental health and wellbeing of veterans," he said. "We're hoping the public will get behind our D-Day 75 campaign by purchasing their own bootprints to mark the great sacrifice of our WW2 heroes, in particular those who helped kick-start the liberation of Europe with the invasion of Normandy on D-Day." Image copyrightGETTY IMAGES Image captionSlapton Sands was used by US forces rehearsing for the D-Day landing at Utah Beach because of its similar geography On 28 April 1944, eight tank landing ships, full of US servicemen and military equipment, converged in Lyme Bay heading for Slapton Sands for the rehearsal. But a group of E-boats from the Kriegsmarine were alerted to heavy radio traffic and intercepted the slow-moving convoy. A series of tragic misfortunes, including communication problems which led to deaths from live Allied fire, compounded the toll. The Exercise Tiger incident was only nominally reported afterwards because of the strict secrecy of the D-Day landings. The D-Day rehearsal that cost 800 lives Survivors' tales of covered up disaster Slapton service remembers Exercise Tiger Pam Wills, 85, from Devon, was just 10 when Exercise Tiger took place near her home, and her family was evacuated before the exercise began. She said: "The US soldiers came over and talked to us, they gave us sweets and comics, but they then suddenly disappeared. "We didn't know Exercise Tiger had taken place, but my father, who was in the Royal Observer Corps watching for enemy aircraft, saw ambulances going to and from Slapton Sands, so we knew something was wrong." Image captionA Sherman tank raised from the seabed in 1984 has served a permanent memorial to the dead ever since Commemorative bootprints and special plaques made by veterans to represent each of the 22,763 British and Commonwealth servicemen and women who were killed on D-Day and during the Battle of Normandy in the summer of 1944 will go on sale. Mr Barraud said: "Our enduring hope is that every one of the US, British and Commonwealth soldiers, sailors and airmen who gave their lives will have a bootprint purchased in their memory." Thank you
  21. Walt's Daughter

    174th Engineer Combat Battalion

    That's not to say that Dean won't see it in the future, if he's hunting on the web, but... you never know.
  22. John L

    174th Engineer Combat Battalion

    Thank you Marion.
  23. Walt's Daughter

    174th Engineer Combat Battalion

    I don't know if you can reach Dean directly, because if you look again, it was a guestbook entry that SonofaMP copied to this post. Dean was never a member of this forum. And unfortunately, SonofaMP passed away a few years ago. Sorry to give you that bad news.
  24. John L

    174th Engineer Combat Battalion

    Hello Dean, My father, Edward Lucashu, was in Company "C". I actually have copies of the orders that issued the bronze service star to particpants at Okinawa, and for the Bronze service arrowhead for participants in the Leyte landings. Was you dad named John? He was in Company "B". Attached photos show your dad's name. He is on both lists. I also have several photos of men in the unit but there are only a couple that I can figure out the name. Have you ever seen the color photo of McArthur when he landed at Leyte? There are a lot of guys standing around and I'm pretty sure one of them is my dad. My dad told me that he was right near him when he landed. Perhaps your dad was there too! Below is the web address of the photo. https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.emersonkent.com%2Fimages%2Fi_have_returned.jpg&imgrefurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.emersonkent.com%2Fspeeches%2Fi_have_returned.htm&docid=nCklfvYvoSjvUM&tbnid=0aqRQHoxPyEE-M%3A&vet=10ahUKEwiCkrnIvtPhAhUmn-AKHSNfDvcQMwhvKBUwFQ..i&w=550&h=380&bih=757&biw=1600&q=general macarthur leyte&ved=0ahUKEwiCkrnIvtPhAhUmn-AKHSNfDvcQMwhvKBUwFQ&iact=mrc&uact=8
  25. meirosek

    old monument to 6th engineers in vierville

    Hello Dave, I was not able to pull up the location in Google Maps as you described. Is it possible for you to provide an alternative way for you to do this? Do you have any more pictures or info on this? You mentioned that you had an email address for someone that had a lot interest in the old monument. I ask because my grandfather was the stonemason that built this monument and I'd love to get as much info on the current state of this monument and its whereabouts. Thanks so much. Kevin
  26. Walt's Daughter

    What the major is up to now

    That is very cool. Hope you will be happy as hell in your new job and of course your new soon-to-be home in Texas. But of course, that just means you are farther away from me, but I will try not to be selfish. ha! Guess these means I will just have to come on down, y'all and visit. Congrats!!!!!
  27. CaptO

    What the major is up to now

    Update time! So I got the job at Lockheed! I'll be working with the rocket launcher programs (MLRS and HIMARS) in Grand Prairie, Texas. Grand Prairie is in between Dallas and Fort Worth on the Dallas side. I start in May. I'll be living a little closer to Fort Worth and we are pretty close to closing on a house! Busy time at the O'Brien house right now. More to follow!
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