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1058th pc&r or port construction and repair group

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Hello, my name is donald rhyne my dad Virgil rhyne was with this group 1058th ENGRS PC&R group in ww2.Was in england assembling the mullberrries as a welder pre-dday.then to omaha beach d+? in operation cobra.over to grainville france to repair this port,also cherborgh later.Later Shipped to the hurtagen forest operation.Had trenchfoot either at hurtegen battles or battle of the bulge?shipped home before his group was decimated at the remagen bridge collapse,6 of his group lost.Trying to find a guy named lightfoot?Any help is appricated.donald rhyne columbia,illinois

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Welcome to the group. I was just heading off for a good night's sleep, so will post more later. Will try to help to the best of our abilities. Good night all...

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Welcome Donald.

Once again I delve into the US Combat Engineers 'bible'!

Granville.

The port of Granville was captured on the 3rd July 1944 and was the first port taken after the breakout. As the tonnage target rose, on the 25th of August the 1058th Port Construction and Repair Group went to Granville to prepare additional coaster berths. It was to operate entirely as a coaling port.

The Ludendorff Bridge at Remagen.

The Germans had certainly tried to knock out the Ludendorff bridge and a team from the 1058th PC & RG undertook the heavy steel work on the bridge and they were soon making good progress. Lt Col, Clayton A. Ross was walking over the bridge accompanied by his Exec Officer when about halfway across he heard a sharp crack. It was a rivethead shearing. The whole deck trembled, dust rose and the next moment he was in the water. The center span was twisting and buckling, then it fell into the water along with the adjacent spans. In the collapse of the bridge 6 members of the 276th EB were killed and 11 missing along with 60 injured. The commander of the 1058th PC & RG, Major Carr was killed; 7 of his men were missing and 6 injured. A German demolition charge some days earlier had weakened the bridge, but the immediate cause was thought to be the vibrations from German and US artillery fire. Within 3 days the US engineers had built and opened a class 40 floating Baily bridge to replace the Bridge at Remagen!

The Roosevelt Bridge.

The 1058th were involved in construction of this road bridge over the Rhine and Lippe rivers and named after the president who had died less than a week before it was built.

 

Colin.

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Just woke up and saw your reply to Donald. Thanks so much for doing this. :armata_PDT_37:

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Welcome Donald.

Once again I delve into the US Combat Engineers 'bible'!

Granville.

The port of Granville was captured on the 3rd July 1944 and was the first port taken after the breakout. As the tonnage target rose, on the 25th of August the 1058th Port Construction and Repair Group went to Granville to prepare additional coaster berths. It was to operate entirely as a coaling port.

The Ludendorff Bridge at Remagen.

The Germans had certainly tried to knock out the Ludendorff bridge and a team from the 1058th PC & RG undertook the heavy steel work on the bridge and they were soon making good progress. Lt Col, Clayton A. Ross was walking over the bridge accompanied by his Exec Officer when about halfway across he heard a sharp crack. It was a rivethead shearing. The whole deck trembled, dust rose and the next moment he was in the water. The center span was twisting and buckling, then it fell into the water along with the adjacent spans. In the collapse of the bridge 6 members of the 276th EB were killed and 11 missing along with 60 injured. The commander of the 1058th PC & RG, Major Carr was killed; 7 of his men were missing and 6 injured. A German demolition charge some days earlier had weakened the bridge, but the immediate cause was thought to be the vibrations from German and US artillery fire. Within 3 days the US engineers had built and opened a class 40 floating Baily bridge to replace the Bridge at Remagen!

The Roosevelt Bridge.

The 1058th were involved in construction of this road bridge over the Rhine and Lippe rivers and named after the president who had died less than a week before it was built.

 

Colin.

Colin, Thanks for the information on my dads 1058th PC&R ENGRS .What book did you find that info IN?I just recieved the Battle of the bulge 50th anniversary book.It had a guy named gene s. crocker from the( 1058th engr.pc&r group,AUS, corps of engrs) in it.He stated his group landed at omaha beachand crossed threw stlo and into grandville,fr.He said they repaired it in recored time moved on to cherbourg.He said they then helped with the reairs there until being moved to the front(the bulge)in DEC 1944.They participated in these battles: northern france,ardennes,rhineland,central europe,APT Philippine liberation.Thanks donald rhyne columbia ,il

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Colin and I both have a book called:

 

The Corps of Engineers - The War Against Germany - Authors: Alfred M. Beck; Abe Bortz; Charles W. Lynch; Lidia Mayo; And Ralph F. Weld - Publisher: Department of the Army -

The book describes in detail the role of the Army Corps Engineers in various campaigns, from North Africa, Italy, as well as Central and Western Europe, from 1941-1944. Includes photos, maps... - Recommended to me by Rod O'Barr. Received the book today (August 9th, 2004), and have already found it intriguing. There are numerous references to the 36th, 39th and 540th Engineers and it will be a tremendous help to me while trying to write a concise history of the VI Corps Engineers.

 

The above paragraph was taken from my BOOKS page on the main site. It was my quick review years ago when I received it.

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Marion, Thanks for the book name ,I just bought it on amazon.I also have a big green book by karl c dod , the us army in ww2 (technical services) Titled="the corps of engineers: The war against japan " .If you ever need it for reference.donald rhyne

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:armata_PDT_37:

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This is what makes replying so worthwhile, a successful outcome and a grateful member.

 

Colin.

 

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Hello, my name is donald rhyne my dad Virgil rhyne was with this group 1058th ENGRS PC&R group in ww2.Was in england assembling the mullberrries as a welder pre-dday.then to omaha beach d+? in operation cobra.over to grainville france to repair this port,also cherborgh later.Later Shipped to the hurtagen forest operation.Had trenchfoot either at hurtegen battles or battle of the bulge?shipped home before his group was decimated at the remagen bridge collapse,6 of his group lost.Trying to find a guy named lightfoot?Any help is appricated.donald rhyne columbia,illinois

 

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Hi: My dad served with the 1058th PC&R Group also. I am new to this site and so excited to find someone else who's father served with mine. My dad's name is Walter Curlock, he is from Oklahoma but inlisted in San Francisco, CA. He passed away in 1991 but I have a few stories, as well as, some pictures of dad with buddies. I also have a few letters that buddies referred to him as 'Rusty'. He went in at Omaha Beach, he said it was D-Day, but I have not been able to confirm. I only know he was attached to 1st Army, but I don't know what other regiment the 1058th was attached to. Maybe you can help me with that. He was a Tech4 Welder Combination. He was injured at Remagen on Ludendorff Bridge, but survived. After being put back on the line, he went back to the 1058th until points caught up with him somewhere in the Philippines in 1945 and he was shipped home and discharged. I can try and answer some of your questions, although I have many myself!

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Gee, when you wrote to me, I had forgotten about this topic. This is SOOOO cool! No wonder you are excited.

 

Welcome to the forum!!!!

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<!--sizeo:4--><span style="font-size:14pt;line-height:100%"><!--/sizeo-->Gee, when you wrote to me, I had forgotten about this topic. This is SOOOO cool! No wonder you are excited.

 

Welcome to the forum!!!!<!--sizec--></span><!--/sizec-->

 

Donald,

 

I have been absent from the forum for quite a while and only today saw your entry. Through my research, I finally discovered that the 1058th PC&R was in overall charge of the bridge repairs at Remagen. My Uncle T-5 George Chandler Company A 341st Engineer (GS) Regiment was attached to some outfit working on the bridge when it fell. He was killed when this happened and I have not been able to nail down just when he was attached or to whom.

 

I am in the process of hiring a researcher to help with my problem and just wanted to say hi. If I can be of any help please ask. Marion and this site has always been great.

 

Parker

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Hello, my name is donald rhyne my dad Virgil rhyne was with this group 1058th ENGRS PC&R group in ww2.Was in england assembling the mullberrries as a welder pre-dday.then to omaha beach d+? in operation cobra.over to grainville france to repair this port,also cherborgh later.Later Shipped to the hurtagen forest operation.Had trenchfoot either at hurtegen battles or battle of the bulge?shipped home before his group was decimated at the remagen bridge collapse,6 of his group lost.Trying to find a guy named lightfoot?Any help is appricated.donald rhyne columbia,illinois

 

My father was in the 1058th also. His name was Walter N. Curlock. He was from Oklahoma. I am also trying to gather information on their experiences while in European Theatre. He went down on the Remagen Bridge while welding. Dad lost a really good friend, last name Johnson, from Turlock California when the bridge collapsed. I don't recall Dad mentioning a friend named 'lightfoot',My dad's nickname was apparently 'Rusty', which I found out from some old letters from his buddies while he was recovering from the collapse. I will try and find the letters and see if 'lightfoot' is mentioned in any of them. It is a good possibility they new each other.

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Donald,

 

I have been absent from the forum for quite a while and only today saw your entry. Through my research, I finally discovered that the 1058th PC&R was in overall charge of the bridge repairs at Remagen. My Uncle T-5 George Chandler Company A 341st Engineer (GS) Regiment was attached to some outfit working on the bridge when it fell. He was killed when this happened and I have not been able to nail down just when he was attached or to whom.

 

I am in the process of hiring a researcher to help with my problem and just wanted to say hi. If I can be of any help please ask. Marion and this site has always been great.

 

Parker

 

My dad, Walter N. Curlock 1058th went down while welding on the Remagen Bridge. He was injured, but survived only to have back problems the rest of his life. I have pictures of the bridge right after the collapse if you are interested. I would really be interested in what your researcher finds out for you.My father said his friends died because while they were welding they were chained to the bridge to keep them from falling (he guessed)When the bridge collapsed the men died because they couldn't away from the steel structures they were attached to. He said he was one of the lucky ones and pulled himself loose after his girder hit the bottom of the river.

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This is what the forum is all about; putting people together who have common threads. I am delighted you are able to get to know each other and to discover more information through this exchange. Your father's would be proud.

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Just today came across this forum. Donald you asked about a person named Lightfoot with the 1058th.

 

I was with the 1058th from late 1944 when the group was being assembled in Porthcawl, Wales until it was disbanded in the Phillipines in late 1946. I have a listing of home addresses of the group, which is not dated, but must be over 65 years old by now. Probably some 300 names on the list.

 

I do remember a Sgt. Lightfoot; William V. Lightfoot, address: Gen. Delivery, Sewanee, Tenn. Your father, Virgil A Rhyne, is on the list living at 6924 Plymouth, University City, MO. Also mentioned in this forum and on the list was Walter M. P. Curlock, living at 303 North Broadway, Sayre, Oklahoma. I do not specifically remember these two.

 

Memorable events were the days while camped just south of London while the unit was engaged in the construction of concrete docks to be floated over to France and enduring the almost daily "Buzz Bomb" and V2 Missile attacks; then to Granville, France clearing debris and installation of new cranes; The train journey from Cherbourg to Remochamps on the infamous "40 and 8's"; The Remagen Bridge and it's tragic collapse and loss of men; Neuweid, and the construction of the Captain Arthur Francis Gullo Memorial Bridge in memory of the engineering officer killed in the collapse of the Ludendorff Bridge; the German surrender and the long voyage from Marsielle, France via the Panama Canal to Luzon, Phillipines. Japan's surrender and the return from Manila to San Francisco in late December 1945,

 

Walt

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Dear Walt:

 

How very wonderful to have you as a member. Always a pleasure and an honor to have another WWII veteran, especially an engineer, join our ranks. Kind of partial to the name WALT, for that was my father's name. :pdt12:

 

We look forward to talking with you. Thank you for sharing some memories with us. Can't imagine seeing that bridge collapse. Brings chills to the bones.

 

Warmly,

Marion

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Sir, it is good to have you aboard! Were you ever in Subic Bay? I am in the Marines and we just did an exercise there in October. I doubt there is any place in the Philippines (or any place in the Pacific for that matter) that would be recognizable, however.

 

My pictures are here:

<https://picasaweb.google.com/104745627018165888181/PHIBLEX?noredirect=1#>

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Walt: Thank you for responding to our inquiries. I also have a list of the names and addresses of the 1058th my Dad left me. My Dad's name is Walter N.P. Curlock. He passed away in Dec 1991 (age 71) in Las Vegas, NV. He had lived there since 1962. I found out through some old letters the guys called him 'Rusty'. A few of his buddies were Sgt. Carl J. Campbell from South Carolina; Robert Sherrow from Indiana; Charles O. Gaston from Missouri; Ray Gillihan from Texas; Herbert Johnson from California; Henry Albertson from Kansas, to name a few I know of. I appreciated very much your story of the history of the 1058th, where they started out from and some of the places along the way. I have tried to find out some of the information you wrote about but have 'hit' alot of dead ends. Apparently, all of the records of the 1058th were distroyed in a fire many years ago. I would appreciate any more information you can give me such as your participation in The Battle of the Bulge and if you were in Hurtgen Forrest, etc.

Thank you so much for sharing your story with us.

Saundra

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Hi Walt,

I have just joined the forum,my fathers name was William Edward Luhrs a staff sergeant with the 1058 engineers .

He met my mother in Porthcawl in 1944.Its a long story ,My question is did you know him by any chance.

I am now 67 years old and trying to fill in some blank spaces.

My father died in 1959. sadly I never got to know .

Kind Regards

John.

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John:

 

Was so nice talking with you on the phone last night. Always great to get a friendly call from jolly ol' England.

 

As promised, I will gather all the links I suggested last night and send them to you via email.

 

All the best to you. Can't wait till you get a chance to talk with Walt.

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Hi Marion,Great talking to you,Looking forward to your email with researchers details.I phoned NARA Maryland re; unit details

but just got endless recorded messages.

I am also hoping to talk to Walt in the near future.

Kind Regards

John.

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Just sent you an email this morning John. All the best. Let me know if you have any questions.

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Received this letter and photos

 

 

Dear all,

I like to share a photo of George N. Chandler with you. Thank you for your research and sharing his photo with us.

Best wishes,
Astrid van Erp

 

 

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