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Camp near Siegberg Germany?

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Jean,

 

yes it works!

 

She is in Steinfeld, you should look for Steinfeld/Eifel or Kall-Steinfeld, there are about 14 villages with this name in Germany - a lot of stony fields here ;)

 

Christoph

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I have found something about those who died in Siegburg as POW:

 

http://www.demerath-eifel.de/kultur/images/Mahnmal_Deutsch.PDF shall be a memorial for the B-26 crews crashed in the Eifel 23th Dec. 1944.

The pilot Capt. Mont F. Stephensen was hurt and came to the Hospital in Siegburg where he died on 03rd Jan. 1945. The author describes that he contacted Stephensen's family to inform them about what he knows and about the memorial cross standing at the place of the crash.

 

His burial in Riverton, Salt Lake County, is mentioned here http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=31042640 (another link: http://www.b26.com/marauderman/mont_stephensen.htm), burial means he is really buried there, doesn't it? So it seems as if he came home after the war, even though these pages term the 23rd December as date of his death.

 

The SiegburgMortuaryPhoto is made in the front court of the abbey. When you go through the bigger arched gateway you are outside of the abbey, some meters further you are at the upper end of the wall of the rose garden. Through the smaller gateway you come to stairs ending at a small platform on the wall of the abbey. I don't really know where there is a mortuary.

 

Christoph

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www.jjworld.com/images/BarbarasCatalogueCampsAndPrisonsPart2.pdf

 

Christoph,

 

Thank you for locating that information on Stephensen. I think at one time I had found something but never the definite connection to his being at the hospital and his death there. Is that author still alive and would he share with you who he contacted in the Stephensen family. Maybe I could contact the family, if it makes sense, and see if they have a death certificate or other information.

 

My assumption is my Dad buried Stephensen in that little cemetery, if he died at the Hospital.

 

I forwarded your information to someone at the Marauder Association to see if they know anything about him.

 

Now regarding the photo, we took that photo on our trip in 1987. I have other photos that we took at the Abbey but I would have to visit the Abbey again to understand the areas that you have described. As for the mortuary, I have always assumed it was a temporary location. The Abbey was so different, from my Dad's perspective in 1987. But when he saw that door it was very familiar to him, and he felt certain that was where the mortuary had been.

 

Regarding visit to the Sister, I am trying to figure it out. I need to know your availability, but my situation is tenuous at the moment because of my Mom. I will keep you posted as I know more.

 

Jean J

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Jean

 

A local newspaper has published something about the author, Hermann-Josef Stolz:

http://www.volksfreund.de/nachrichten/region/daun/aktuell/Heute-in-der-Dauner-Zeitung-Der-Geschichte-auf-der-Spur;art751,2711681

In brief: He is a honorary employee of the state archeology Rhineland-Palatinate at the state museum in Trier, and he also helps US army agencies to clear up the fates of soldiers missed in action. He is searching for crashed airplanes of WWII and celtic and roman relics in the Eifel for more than 30 years. He has some contacts in the US and visited veterans there, some departments of the US defense department have contacted him for his help.

 

I think he speaks English so I will send you his contact data as message and you can contact him directly.

 

Christoph

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Oh wow, this is simply fascinating. It seems every day now, something of great importance is being posted.

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Christoph and Marion,

 

You are both so kind. Marion, I saw something about a documentary that you have. May I purchase it?

 

Christoph, you are a great researcher and so generous to share your time helping me! The author of the Stephensen information has quite a background and who knows what else he may know. Thank You! It is interesting, I did find the article on Stephenson that I had filed away some time ago and I think the information was gotten from the Stolz article.

 

I will let you know when I try to contact Stolz. It may be a little while, as I try to figure out schedule with you and Germany and Mom.

 

I wanted to tell you how I came about having the Red Cross Map. When my Mom received the awful telegram that Dad went Missing she went to a Red Cross Meeting in she believes, NYC. She tried to find out all she could about my Dad and they gave out that map. The fellow that I mentioned before, who had been at Stalag 6G, and been a President of the National Ex POW Organization was unaware of that map and I printed one out for him since he did not have a computer.

 

Bye for the moment,

Jean J

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Jean, thanks for your kind words. Yes, you can go directly to the site, www.nobridgetoofar.com and purchase from there. Thank you for your interest.

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Hi Guys!

 

I have ordered the documentary. The art work looks incredible. Marion, don't tell me you are an artist in addition to everything else.

 

Christoph, I have put in my latest request to the National Archives. Now we wait.

 

Christoph, I forwarded your English Version on Stephensen and Stolz to the Marauder Organization and told them that "Christoph from Germany sent me this:"

 

Thank you Guys again.

 

Jean J

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I cannot take any credit for the artwork. Please see my credit list on the No Bridge Too Far site! :pdt12: Unfortunately, that is NOT one of my talents!

 

Can't wait to hear your comments.

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Just a few news today. I found two other soldiers who died as POW in Siegburg:

36653803 CULIK JOHN J JR ARMY European Theatre: Germany Died as POW GERMANY Military Hospital Siegburg Rheinland, Prussia 50-07

36676096 WESTGATE ROY L JR ARMY European Theatre: Germany Died as POW GERMANY Military Hospital Siegburg Rheinland, Prussia 50-07

 

and here

http://www.dailypres...2.html?nav=5001

something about the Red Cross flags - in the last days of war the hospital was misused as observation post :armata_PDT_23: !

Christoph

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Christoph,

 

Hello I am back on line again!

 

This is another, “Oh my gosh!!” For some reason the Culik name sounds familiar - but maybe not. I will go through my papers. The Westgate name is new to me. I will see what I can learn.

 

Now the funny thing is that I wanted to surprise you with something, but you did it first! And of course, I am very very very grateful!

 

Now my surprise for you is that the fellow, Brian, associated with the Marauders wrote: “I have communicated in the past with Mr Stolz. One day I would like to be able to meet him in person and see the collections of artifacts that he and others have made from the crash sites. I have ongoing communications with other people about these currently. “

 

Brian said, like everyone else, he is so busy with his work and life, that he just does not get enough time for his 'Hobby' pursuits!!

 

Christoph, with all of your passion for history, I bet you soon try to go see his collection! I was going to draft a letter to him at some point, if that is useful for you.

 

The Davidson story is quite incredible! The whole article was the best summary of how the Abbey's life ended as a Military Hospital in WW2. The Allies had already experienced one instance of a building with the Red Cross signs on it being used improperly by the German Military. I am so happy to finally have a real 1st hand description of what occurred. You are amazing!

 

And that Red Cross on the building matches what Sister E. Koch wrote.

 

Thank you again,

Jean J

 

One day I will find my notes from the Siegburg historian, and their name, who did say there was a lot of artillery fighting going on from the Abbey, but no bombing after a time in March. The historian also said that Siegburg received less damage than other towns.

 

Jean

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I shall fix it for you...

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Thank You Marion!

 

Christoph, I spoke to a Vet today who was on the Dryden plane. He was wounded but was taken to Lindberg, Germany and did not know anything about Siegburg.

 

I did however get to ask him about the bombing that Sister Edeltrud referred to. Not the specifics but in general if the English bombed at night, and assuming that the Dec. 28th bombing occurred at night, would they, the bombers, be able to see a big red cross on the roof of a building. He said No - it was pitch black at night.

 

The gentleman also said the English bombed to break the morale of the people and that is why they bombed cities. Whereas the Americans bombed to destroy anything that helped the German Army.

 

I talked to him for quite awhile about his experience and that Dec. 23rd, 1944 mission and so forth. He was really impressive for 91 years old!

 

Christoph, do you have any idea how old the Nun is or how is her health. I guess those are not easy questions to ask.

 

Jean

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No, sorry, she might be in her eighties? Sister Gracia has only said that she doesn't hear well and that she is the oldest sister in the cloister.

 

Christoph

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But they have a camp report:

 

Camp Reports: Germany: Hospitals: Siegburg Res Laz

http://research.arch...cription/892897

 

Online there's only a description, to obtain the records you (or we) should contact the National Archives and Records Administration.

 

Christoph

 

Edit:

You have seen this description?

http://research.archives.gov/description/598914

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Christoph,

 

As always, you are amazing! I started working with what you sent. I also contacted the Army Records facility at Carlisle, Pa. this AM. The fellow on the phone was terrific but after more research it does not appear that I will be able to easily find anything. Not yet, at least. The website is: usahec.org

 

I went back to the Eisenhower Library and told them a gentleman in Germany sent me these websites. Maybe something will appear.

 

More to follow,

Jean J

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Christoph,

 

A little progress - the gentleman at Eisenhower Library will pursue the one website you sent me.

 

Yesterday, the gentleman at Carlisle made an astute observation. He does not think that Collins would have done the debriefing. I am trying to figure out what G-2's, intelligence officers, might have been at Remagen at the time.

 

Also trying to figure out what American outfit would have been in the countryside between Siegburg and Remagen, assuming that is the direction my Dad ran when he escaped. Not necessarily because of the debriefing but who knows, the 2 guys in the jeep that my Dad spotted from afar could still be alive today. Unlikely, but so was finding Norton and the Sister. I am however, very curious about that outfit. And so many other things, but another time.

 

Regarding the Sister, more to follow.

 

Jean J

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Jean,

 

I sent an e-mail to the NARA asking for the Camp Report, and another one to the National Archives (UK). They have an Red Cross Report (Ref. no. WO 224/175) concerning Prisoner of War Camps in Europe, particularly also the "Seigburg Lazarett" from 1944: https://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/displaycataloguedetails.asp?CATLN=6&CATID=27524. Today they answered with an estimate, the copying cost for all 116 pages would be 52.20 Pounds. That's quiet much, and I don't know what I would pay for, and all information is from sometime in 1944. I could also send them a description of what I'm looking for, but: What am I exactly looking for?

 

If your father was was in Siegburg until the bomb raid of 3rd March: That was before the Ludendorff bridge and Bonn were taken. How could he know that he should run in direction to Remagen at that moment?

 

 

So many questions

Christoph

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Christoph,

 

I could not respond earlier and so happy that the system is up and running now. It is always so exciting to see if you have written anything.

 

First of all, as always, Thank You very much for all of your efforts! I can send you a check for whatever costs you incur on my behalf. You are a riot when you say "What am I exactly looking for?" That is so funny. And my response, will be I am not sure. This is a tougher task than you thought!

 

I have written you off line and not sure if the messages have arrived.

 

Great questions about where on earth do you run, even if you do get out. On top of that my Dad had a rotten sense of direction! But Dad did not escape until March 15th so that solves the Remagen Bridge knowledge since that was March 7th. Early in Dad's Vmails home from Siegburg (I have to look for exactly what he said) he did not appear to have much War news like from a radio. The news was coming from the captured and wounded soldiers.

 

But ( because of limited time) I can tell you at a later time more details about the fact that they did have some way of getting news.

 

So assuming Dad knew about Remagen, and his last 2 days of running and hiding he spent at a German farmhouse that had a young Belgian boy doing the farming, where was he? As Dad would say, he was not there as a tourist! And no gave him an itinerary of just where he was at any special time. He knew he landed D Day on Utah Beach and I got him to write down, as best he could, what the names were of all of the places he fought in or passed through. But this location is quite vague. He was, however, pleased with the potato soup that the farmers gave them. He felt it had more potatoes in it than what was on the menu at Siegburg.

 

Now what unit was in this vague location is a question. More to follow tomorrow,

Jean

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Siegburg was for about three weeks under artillery fire before the attack over the Sieg river began on April 7, 1945, 11 00 hours. Have you read Ray Repasky's memoirs on the main site here http://www.6thcorpscombatengineers.com/RayRepasky.htm? That means the US troops could not have been far away from Siegburg when your Dad was there until the 16th. Siegburg was taken by the 97th infantry division. (http://www.lonesentry.com/gi_stories_booklets/97thinfantry/index.html), maybe they were also the first to be seen by your Dad, or perhaps the 13th tankers (http://www.13tharmoreddivision.org/)?

 

You should not send a cheque but if you like order the documents you want on your own, I think they might be more interesting for you than for the rest of the world including me - you may of course let us participate if you'll something really interesting :P

The last message I got from you is of 24th.

 

Christoph

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