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292nd Engineer Combat Battalion (New Member)

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Ken,

 

you mentioned a book on the 9th Army that recently came back in print at the following link:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Conquer-Story-Ninth-Army-1944-1945/dp/1530041368/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1457848631&sr=8-2&keywords=ninth+army

 

Here's a link to the original publication available to view online:

 

http://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015019378531

 

Gary

 

 

 

I have not read this book but will definitely check it out, always looking for something new to read.

 

Randy

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I just ordered seven copies of the Company A panoramic photo for various members of my family. The folks at Hampton were very cordial and patient and I had a long discussion about how this all came about and about the unit. They were happy to here that others had received their copies and were happy with what they received.

 

I will anxiously wait for them to arrive as will other members of my family! Thanks, again, to Lisa and Marion for this once in a lifetime opportunity!

 

Gary

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Greetings from Warren's Son. My father, Warren Schroeder, was with the 292nd Engineers and while doing some research I discovered your website. My father has been deceased for many years and I wish I could question him about his past experiences. He did not talk too often or in depth about what he did and saw. He was wounded in North Africa at Kasserine Pass, I remember him saying. You will see from the transcript that he went on to many other countries after that.

 

Anyway, I felt the need to share what little I had of his past and thought you would be interested in seeing his military record. I attached a copy along with some photos of him and hopefully it can be enlarged by clicking on it. Let me know what you think.

Best regards,

Dennis Schroeder

 

 

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Ok everybody,

Here are the photos I have that have more than just my grandfather in them.

 

 

The most important photo is the group titled "This is 1st squad" It is labeled on the back (not in order of the photo) My grandfather is in the middle row in the center for frame of reference.

 

The labeling is top to bottom starting at: Will, Pagoria, Bateman, Lawrence, Herzie, Savill, Toot, Guthrie, Schemehorn, Kollman, Santer

 

There is one with you boxing with someone unidentified

 

There is one with him with a man with the last name Gardecki all bundled for winter.

 

There is one with him planning at Gosselies Belgium

 

There is a group photo that is unlabeled

 

There is one at the POW camp, not sure if any of you had any serve there as well but thought I would attach it.

 

There is one with him in a picture with Captain Moran and Staff Sergeant Kosmari (I think that is how it is spelled on the back) and it is at Camp 20 Grand.

 

 

post-2511-0-74806400-1458186679_thumb.jpg

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Greetings from Warren's Son. My father, Warren Schroeder, was with the 292nd Engineers and while doing some research I discovered your website. My father has been deceased for many years and I wish I could question him about his past experiences. He did not talk too often or in depth about what he did and saw. He was wounded in North Africa at Kasserine Pass, I remember him saying. You will see from the transcript that he went on to many other countries after that.

 

Anyway, I felt the need to share what little I had of his past and thought you would be interested in seeing his military record. I attached a copy along with some photos of him and hopefully it can be enlarged by clicking on it. Let me know what you think.

Best regards,

Dennis Schroeder

 

 

Great to have you here Dennis! As you can see, this topic is one of the most popular on the forum right now. It's wonderful to see the exchange of information.

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Greetings from Warren's Son. My father, Warren Schroeder, was with the 292nd Engineers and while doing some research I discovered your website. My father has been deceased for many years and I wish I could question him about his past experiences. He did not talk too often or in depth about what he did and saw. He was wounded in North Africa at Kasserine Pass, I remember him saying. You will see from the transcript that he went on to many other countries after that.

 

Anyway, I felt the need to share what little I had of his past and thought you would be interested in seeing his military record. I attached a copy along with some photos of him and hopefully it can be enlarged by clicking on it. Let me know what you think.

Best regards,

Dennis Schroeder

 

 

 

 

 

Hello Dennis!

 

We are certainly glad that you have found us and hope you will hang out with us for awhile. Unless I have lost track, counting you now makes 8 individuals on this fine forum that had relatives in the 292nd, one more an we can have our own baseball team! There is one observation I have made so far about your father's service, and that is he must have belonged to another unit before the 292nd. The reason I say this is because the 292nd were active in the Rhineland and Central Europe campaigns only. The 292nd was formed on 5 NOV 1943 and with your father entering service in 1941 he must have belonged to a different unit before being transferred to the 292nd. We look forward to anything you my have to share with us and I would like to wish you a warm welcome to the forum. Have a good one Dennis!

 

Randy

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Greetings from Warren's Son. My father, Warren Schroeder, was with the 292nd Engineers and while doing some research I discovered your website. My father has been deceased for many years and I wish I could question him about his past experiences. He did not talk too often or in depth about what he did and saw. He was wounded in North Africa at Kasserine Pass, I remember him saying. You will see from the transcript that he went on to many other countries after that.

 

Anyway, I felt the need to share what little I had of his past and thought you would be interested in seeing his military record. I attached a copy along with some photos of him and hopefully it can be enlarged by clicking on it. Let me know what you think.

Best regards,

Dennis Schroeder

 

 

Dennis,

 

Wonderful to have you on board, my friend. I echo Randy in saying we hope that you will hang out with us for a long while. No doubt your father was part of another unit especially since you mentioned he was wounded at the Kasserine Pass in North Africa. We all work together here to try and assist folks in finding out more info about their relatives and about the unit itself. It is all about give and take as you probably already realize.

 

Thanks so much for dropping by... stay awhile and put up your feet, my friend! :)

 

Gary

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Ok everybody,

Here are the photos I have that have more than just my grandfather in them.

 

 

The most important photo is the group titled "This is 1st squad" It is labeled on the back (not in order of the photo) My grandfather is in the middle row in the center for frame of reference.

 

The labeling is top to bottom starting at: Will, Pagoria, Bateman, Lawrence, Herzie, Savill, Toot, Guthrie, Schemehorn, Kollman, Santer

 

There is one with you boxing with someone unidentified

 

There is one with him with a man with the last name Gardecki all bundled for winter.

 

There is one with him planning at Gosselies Belgium

 

There is a group photo that is unlabeled

 

There is one at the POW camp, not sure if any of you had any serve there as well but thought I would attach it.

 

There is one with him in a picture with Captain Moran and Staff Sergeant Kosmari (I think that is how it is spelled on the back) and it is at Camp 20 Grand.

 

 

Ken,

 

Thanks so much for posting these images. Even if the images don't have relatives of most us they are sure another glimpse into the past and how these men survived their service away from their families in a foreign land. I look forward to many long and fruitful posts and to reading everything and anything that you have to say. You are such an asset to our little group. :)

 

Onward and upward, my friend!

 

Gary

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Whoa, Boy! I received my 292nd Combat Engineer Battalion, Company A prints today and they are fantastic!!! I couldn't have asked for a better value for what I received. Hampton House did a wonderful job on their end! Thank you, thank you, thank you, Lisa, for taking the time to set this up and to Marion for having the foresight years ago to set up this portal to the past! My family and I are forever in your debt!

 

Gary

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Glad you got them Gary. I agree with you that Hampton House did a terrific job on the reproductions. I know I will cherish mine always.

 

Randy

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Ok everybody,

Here are the photos I have that have more than just my grandfather in them.

 

 

The most important photo is the group titled "This is 1st squad" It is labeled on the back (not in order of the photo) My grandfather is in the middle row in the center for frame of reference.

 

The labeling is top to bottom starting at: Will, Pagoria, Bateman, Lawrence, Herzie, Savill, Toot, Guthrie, Schemehorn, Kollman, Santer

 

There is one with you boxing with someone unidentified

 

There is one with him with a man with the last name Gardecki all bundled for winter.

 

There is one with him planning at Gosselies Belgium

 

There is a group photo that is unlabeled

 

There is one at the POW camp, not sure if any of you had any serve there as well but thought I would attach it.

 

There is one with him in a picture with Captain Moran and Staff Sergeant Kosmari (I think that is how it is spelled on the back) and it is at Camp 20 Grand.

 

 

 

 

Ken,

 

Always enjoy seeing pictures, as the old saying goes "are worth a thousand words", thanks so much for posting these. There are three names you have listed from the pictures that I have found in the Company A records that I have:

 

PFC Roy T. Kollman

PVT John F. Guthrie Westchester County, New York

PVT Floyd Savill Hancock County, Indiana

 

Here are three photos from my grandfather's collection at a POW camp. The first two are not labeled, in each my grandfather is on the right with an unidentified soldier on the left.

 

post-2432-0-27491200-1458657407_thumb.jpg post-2432-0-01215100-1458657421_thumb.jpg

 

The last one is a photo of just him, I just discovered this morning it had writing on the back, awesome!

 

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Apparently the 292nd not only built POW camps but helped in the guarding of the prisoners as well. My grandfather's letters to home make several references to guarding German prisoners. Have a good one everybody and keep those pictures coming!

 

Randy

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Ken,

 

Always enjoy seeing pictures, as the old saying goes "are worth a thousand words", thanks so much for posting these. There are three names you have listed from the pictures that I have found in the Company A records that I have:

 

PFC Roy T. Kollman

PVT John F. Guthrie Westchester County, New York

PVT Floyd Savill Hancock County, Indiana

 

Here are three photos from my grandfather's collection at a POW camp. The first two are not labeled, in each my grandfather is on the right with an unidentified soldier on the left.

 

attachicon.gifIMG.jpg attachicon.gifIMG_0003.jpg

 

The last one is a photo of just him, I just discovered this morning it had writing on the back, awesome!

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0001.jpg attachicon.gifIMG_0002.jpg

 

Apparently the 292nd not only built POW camps but helped in the guarding of the prisoners as well. My grandfather's letters to home make several references to guarding German prisoners. Have a good one everybody and keep those pictures coming!

 

Randy

Randy,

 

Great addition to our group. Makes you want to figure out who those other guys are? Maybe someday soon, my friend. I was so happy with the prints that I had to call Hampton House and let them know. Laura was great! The one thing that struck me as a little unusual was that the "C" Company photo that you acquired had labeling added when developing or printing, but "A" Company did not. I thought that was kind of an odd inconsistency. Did Lisa ever mention if her relative said much about how he came to get the original print? Also, did your grandfather send many letters back after Germany surrendered? My grandfather sent a leter with a list of when certain things occurred after censorship was lifted following Germany's surrender. If your grandfather sent letters later I just wondered without the fear of censorship if he talked somewhat more about what he was experiencing during his deployment?

 

More questions sometimes than answers, but we'll keep on striving for the answers. :)

 

Gary

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post-2432-0-79129300-1458695224_thumb.jpg

 

Yes Gary, it makes you wonder who they are. There are a couple of other pictures my grandfather had of the fellow that is on the left of this photo I posted earlier.

 

post-2432-0-68575800-1458695235_thumb.jpg post-2432-0-00300800-1458695254_thumb.jpg

 

Makes me wonder if he was a friend.

 

 

 

Hampton House did a marvelous job, it was a nice gesture Gary calling and thanking her personally, kudos!

 

I think all of the panoramic unit photos I have ever seen have had some kind of writing on them, so yes it is a bit different that the Company A photo did not. But hey, we know who they are.

 

I think there are 8 to 10 letters that my grandfather sent home that I have. Two or three are from after the war and there are a few other things he mentions like the one guarding German prisoners. Maybe I'll transcribe them in a future post.

 

Randy

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attachicon.gifIMG.jpg

 

Yes Gary, it makes you wonder who they are. There are a couple of other pictures my grandfather had of the fellow that is on the left of this photo I posted earlier.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0005.jpg attachicon.gifIMG_0004.jpg

 

Makes me wonder if he was a friend.

 

 

 

Hampton House did a marvelous job, it was a nice gesture Gary calling and thanking her personally, kudos!

 

I think all of the panoramic unit photos I have ever seen have had some kind of writing on them, so yes it is a bit different that the Company A photo did not. But hey, we know who they are.

 

I think there are 8 to 10 letters that my grandfather sent home that I have. Two or three are from after the war and there are a few other things he mentions like the one guarding German prisoners. Maybe I'll transcribe them in a future post.

 

Randy

Randy,

 

That's a thought... my grandfather sent dozens of letters home from the time he shipped out to Camp Butner until he came home and my grandmother in her own way knew that they would be important not only for her, but for the future and so kept them all. Family was at the core of who she was and by keeping his letters her family has gotten a glimpse into not only the lifeline he had during his deployment, but also the lifeline she got from him during her daily struggles alone, during wartime with four small boys. You realize that the brave men serving were not the only ones fighting a war, but that the ones left behind had their own battles to fight. So, that's got to go on my list, also... transcribing information from some of their letters that could give a glimpse of what these patriots experienced during their service and how that affected the ones that stayed on the home front.

 

That's my diatribe for the now. Goodnight.

 

Gary

 

p.s. Randy, have you tried to compare the photos to see if there is anyway to match up the mystery "friend" with the men on the company photo that we all have gotten? May not give us a name, but it would be interesting to find him in that photo. Just a thought, my friend. :)

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Here's a link to a short, but interesting New York newspaper account of the crossing of the Roer (Ruhr) River and the building of the Bailey Bridge by the 292nd.

 

http://fultonhistory.com/newspapers%207/Catskill%20NY%20Recorder/Catskill%20NY%20Examiner-Recorder%201945-1946%20Grayscale/Catskill%20NY%20Examiner-Recorder%201945-1946%20Grayscale%20-%200159.pdf

 

Gary

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Awesome. Love to read about bridges. It's my favorite.

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Greetings from Warren's Son. My father, Warren Schroeder, was with the 292nd Engineers and while doing some research I discovered your website. My father has been deceased for many years and I wish I could question him about his past experiences. He did not talk too often or in depth about what he did and saw. He was wounded in North Africa at Kasserine Pass, I remember him saying. You will see from the transcript that he went on to many other countries after that.

 

Anyway, I felt the need to share what little I had of his past and thought you would be interested in seeing his military record. I attached a copy along with some photos of him and hopefully it can be enlarged by clicking on it. Let me know what you think.

Best regards,

Dennis Schroeder

 

 

Dennis,

 

I ran across a paper written by an officer at Ft Benning in the late 40's about the battle of Kasserine Pass.

 

http://www.benning.army.mil/library/content/Virtual/Donovanpapers/wwii/STUP2/HornadayRalphJ%20%20LTC.pdf

 

Hope it has information relevant to your father's service in North Africa, my friend.

 

Gary

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Randy,

 

That's a thought... my grandfather sent dozens of letters home from the time he shipped out to Camp Butner until he came home and my grandmother in her own way knew that they would be important not only for her, but for the future and so kept them all. Family was at the core of who she was and by keeping his letters her family has gotten a glimpse into not only the lifeline he had during his deployment, but also the lifeline she got from him during her daily struggles alone, during wartime with four small boys. You realize that the brave men serving were not the only ones fighting a war, but that the ones left behind had their own battles to fight. So, that's got to go on my list, also... transcribing information from some of their letters that could give a glimpse of what these patriots experienced during their service and how that affected the ones that stayed on the home front.

 

That's my diatribe for the now. Goodnight.

 

Gary

 

p.s. Randy, have you tried to compare the photos to see if there is anyway to match up the mystery "friend" with the men on the company photo that we all have gotten? May not give us a name, but it would be interesting to find him in that photo. Just a thought, my friend. :)

 

post-2432-0-08111600-1458781396_thumb.jpg

 

I had already done just that Gary. He is on the left side, 3rd row, 4th soldier from the end.

 

post-2432-0-36074100-1458781603_thumb.jpg

 

I also believe this to be Earl Haughton. He is on the right side, 2nd row, 2nd soldier from the end.

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attachicon.gif003 (2400x1800).jpg

 

I had already done just that Gary. He is on the left side, 3rd row, 4th soldier from the end.

 

attachicon.gif004 (2300x1725).jpg

 

I also believe this to be Earl Haughton. He is on the right side, 2nd row, 2nd soldier from the end.

Cool, my friend! I had a thought of identifying as many of the guys as possible as we find them and you have begun that. Great minds think alike! :) Speaking of Haughton, I hope his IDPF will show up sometime soon. I sent in the request last August. You never know about these things, but when it arrives you will be the first person to know.

 

Gary

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Thank you, Gary, for a very informative article. My father was wounded on June 3, 1943, so he may have been at Kasserine Pass, but not injured there. I must have misremembered what he told me. Attached is the bottom portion of his military

transcript that I posted previously. I've attached the bottom portion of his military transcript that I posted previou See section 27. Anyone know what "EAMET" means?

post-2501-0-74866700-1458831322_thumb.jpg

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Thank you, Gary, for a very informative article. My father was wounded on June 3, 1943, so he may have been at Kasserine Pass, but not injured there. I must have misremembered what he told me. Attached is the bottom portion of his military

transcript that I posted previously. I've attached the bottom portion of his military transcript that I posted previou See section 27. Anyone know what "EAMET" means?

 

European-African-Middle Eastern-Theater

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European-African-Middle Eastern-Theater

Randy... our fountain of knowledge! :)

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Thank you, Gary, for a very informative article. My father was wounded on June 3, 1943, so he may have been at Kasserine Pass, but not injured there. I must have misremembered what he told me. Attached is the bottom portion of his military

transcript that I posted previously. I've attached the bottom portion of his military transcript that I posted previou See section 27. Anyone know what "EAMET" means?

Dennis,

 

No worries, my friend! These things sometimes change over time. Clearly, this is an example of why it is so important to document in "writing" whatever information that he may have told you or that your remember hearing. Minds visualize information especially over time and these mental visuals often are different then what truly happened. Example... I remember as a very young boy overhearing a story about my grandfather having an accident in a truck on a bridge when he served in Europe. Without information I visualized him jumping from a truck as it plunged off a bridge into a river. In recent years this remembrance came to light with my brother saying he had never heard this before. From my grandfather's communication back during his service we learned that there was indeed a truck accident where he fell from the back of the vehicle onto a towing hitch, but no mention that it happened on a bridge. Since my grandfather passed away in 1978 and my Dad passed away a year and a half ago we don't know whether this accident happened on a bridge or if this was just something apocryphal that morphed overtime in the desire of a small boy years ago to know more of what happened? Clearly, some of the information is correct, but are some details a visualization of hearsay in a young boy's mind? Folks, document, document, document! Don't put off until tomorrow what you can do today.

 

The 292nd Counselor has spoken! ;)

 

Gary

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