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j3rdinf

Cigarette Camps. Cont'd

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Marion: Could not post pics on where you posted this topic. So started another topic.

Ah yes, the "cigarette camps". Most of us in the ETO finally ended up in one of them.

All that time and then the waiting to go home. When my turn came to return, I was

transported to Camp Philip Morris at Le Harve Fr. Nothing fancy, but who cared as we would be leaving within a few days to a week. I and most others didnt know anyone as we came from many different outfits. All strangers with one thing in mind. Within 4 days our group of about 700 boarded the La Crosse victory ship in early spring for a 10

or so day cruise to NY . A very strange thing happened on boarding. Saw one of my old

high school friends who I palled around with prior to the war. We kept in contact after

the ETO war was over. He was in a different Infantry division from me, but we had a

planned meeting once about 3 months after V.E. day and had a 3 day get together in

Fulda Germany. Neither of us when we were returning home exactly. Am posting a couple of pics of Camp Philip Morriis.

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Camp Philip Morris in Le Harve Fr.. Early spring '46.philipmorris.jpg

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Yeah! I knew you could do it. Great job there soldier! When I first looked at the second photo really fast, I thought that was a plane diving in and banking. Then I looked again and started laughing. Quite an imagination I have huh? :D

 

Looks like a bunch of soldiers just waiting to get home. Sigh!

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For those who may have missed a great link for the Cigarette Camps of Le Havre, France, click below. It's a great site and very informative.

 

http://www.skylighters.org/special/cigcamps/index.html

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Marion,

Those were great ad's for cigarette but I never seen a news-paper. Too busy plowing through rice paddy's. On some of the Islands the Red Cross was charging G.I. for the smokes.

 

papa

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Quote: " Marion,

Those were great ad's for cigarette but I never seen a news-paper. Too busy plowing through rice paddy's. On some of the Islands the Red Cross was charging G.I. for the smokes." Forgive me but never saw the Red Cross selling cigarettes. This was a P.X.

thing with rations plus we were issued a carton of butts when ever possible on the line.

Also, K and C arations also held small packages when not supplied as such. Also, when

going into the hospital in France, I was given a "dity bag" by the Red Cross containing a

paperback novel, cigarettes, candy, toothbrush razor etc. at no charge. On unfrequent

meetings with the Red Cross we were given FREE coffee and doughnuts when behind the lines if they were there. To me the Red Cross was one hell of a good outfit in my estimation.

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Joe I never seen Red Cross until I arrived in Seattle from South Pacific and I did get free dough-nuts and Coffee. Like civilian life ,there were a lot of con men in the service. Here is a couple of letters from Pacific Area

 

Red cross sold me a carton of "Donated" Camels when I was in the 312th Evac Hospital in Chu-Lai. I paid 2 bucks for the carton and when I opened it I found out that it had been donated by a VFW post in the states. I was taken out for some treatment and when I came back my smokes were gone from the bedside table. I got the ward nurse to call for the "Gray Lady" and when she came back she sold me a carton of camels for 2 bucks. It was the same carton she had sold me about 3 hours before.

 

The donut dollies used to come out to the firebases and sell us coffee that they had gotten from our mess halls. The donuts were probably made by our cooks as well.

 

You all probably remember the "Other Business" that the donut dollies conducted at $65.00 a pop, or one month's hostile fire pay.

 

BTW did you know that the Red Cross "Sells" blood to the Military Services for around $75 a pint? This is the blood that folks Donate. Most of the regional bosses in the Red Cross are pulling down a 6 figure salary every year.

 

I gave my last pint of blood to the Red Cross around 15 years ago, and my last dime to them when I was in Vietnam. I'll donate to the Salvation Army because the folks there are not "Skimming the take" for themselves.

 

papa Art

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Hey Guy. Remember, this forum is "anything about WW 2". Lets not bring in Viet Nam

war. On the Red Cross in Nam, I know nothing. However, dealings I had with the Red

Cross, although not many, were strictly on the up and up. I saw about 2 times when we

temporarily pulled back from the fighting and were met by the doughnut and coffee wagon (Red Cross) . No fees. When waiting to go home at wars end at Fulda Germany we had a Red Cross Club across the main road from our Kaserne. Yes, coffee was free

but doughnuts were 2 for five cents. I found out they charged for the doughnuts so we

wouldnt take a platefull, eat some and leave the rest. Made sense to me. As far as the Red Cross girls comming up to any firing position, we never saw or wanted them

that close to fighting. Lets face it. They are civilians. As far as I saw, the Red Cross

was a honorable group. Yes, I have heard some "talk" by a few disgruntled G.I.s but

that is to be expected. Most all of us were thankfull to have them there, and my hat is

off to them for a good job well done. Also, something Marion may be interested in :

While at Ft. Belvior VA (Engineers) prior to going to the Infantry, at the Belvoir Red Cross Club, they recorded a small record for any G.I. (about 6" in diameter or so)) and

THEY mailed it to our homes (free of any charge). Fact is I still have 2 of them which I

recently ran across. Right now I am trying to have them cleaned up and re-recorded.

I am interested in hearing myself from over 60 years ago.

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Joe:

 

First off it's great that you came across those recordings. You know this gal would love to be able to hear those. Hope you have success in getting them "cleaned-up". Another real treasure.

Also, something Marion may be interested in :

While at Ft. Belvior VA (Engineers) prior to going to the Infantry, at the Belvoir Red Cross Club, they recorded a small record for any G.I. (about 6" in diameter or so)) and

THEY mailed it to our homes (free of any charge). Fact is I still have 2 of them which I

recently ran across. Right now I am trying to have them cleaned up and re-recorded.

I am interested in hearing myself from over 60 years ago.

 

Papa- While it may be true about a few GI's from Nam or whereever, I think for the most part that I would have to agree with Joe and all the GOOD services that were provided by the Red Cross and other organizations during WWII.

 

Not that's it's inappropriate to bring up anything after WWII, but this is dedicated to the WWII and we are trying to compare stories and events during that time period. I'm sure we could find wrong-doings in the Red Cross organization after WWII and during present times, but that shouldn't be our focus here. ;)

 

I am enjoying this post and I thank all for joining in the discussion. Let's hear more.

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Here's a story and part of it takes place at Camp Lucky Strike.

 

An Avoidable Tragedy

 

Here's another story featuring two WWII buddies from the 65th Inf Div and their memories of the Cig Camps.

 

Comrades in Arms Against German Forces

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