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  1. 4 points
    After a lot of encouragement at the 2017 reunion, I have decided to resume production in January 2018. Why the long delay since the release of part one? To be honest, it was due to lack of funding and secondly lack of time. Funding was the primary reason!
  2. 3 points
    WWII finds vehicle he drove in WWII How cool is this? World War II Veteran Locates Ambulance He Drove During the War
  3. 3 points
    CaptO

    D-Day Normandy - 2017

    Hear, hear!!
  4. 3 points
    Christoph

    Jean in Siegburg

    Yesterday I recieved a surprising message from my old internet friend Jean Jacobsen: She's visiting Siegburg with her hubby Steve! So we went up the Michaelsberg to the rose garden, to the Nordfriedhof, where her father had to bring passed american POW to, the synagogue monument... Thanks to Marion who made this possible!
  5. 3 points
    colinhotham

    Jean in Siegburg

    This is a reason for this great website's existence and what it does so well. As always the final credit goes to Marion. Colin.
  6. 3 points
    Jean Jacobson

    Jean in Siegburg

    Where to begin: I had the most incredible experience recently when finally I met the brilliant, kind, and generous Christoph! For me nothing will ever compare to this encounter – it was out of a dream…. I finally met the real “Christoph.” Brilliant, kind and generous do not really begin to describe what a wonderful human being he is! On his own time he has helped solve the mysteries of a critically important and life changing period in my Dad’s life and it is something my Dad wanted solved. And Marion, what a surprise to find in addition to all of the wonderful ways Christoph could be described – he is also very handsome! Marion, wait until you meet him! I want to adopt him! It really was out of a dream – we met in the center of the town, and then together with my husband, Steve, we walked up the hill to the Abbey! We all saw for the first time the new addition to the Abbey. I understand the folks that now own the Abbey needed more space and they came up with a modern addition. It is possibly the best design that could have been done. But for me the majesty and spirit of the Abbey that was over 1000 years old, was changed forever with this new addition. The 3 of us walked the now rose garden where some prisoners from not only America but Russia and France (and as some POW’s referred to it – it was like the United Nations) survived in decrepit and small spaces. But remembering that so many were fortunate to survive is what it is all about. From the Abbey I finally had a chance to observe and walk the hill that I believe was the place Dad had described in a VMAIL home. I could now really understand and sympathize even more with Dad about his long, cold, and emotional journeys from the Abbey to the Cemetery. Christopher led us there!!! Can you believe it! We walked there just like Dad did. What a distance in any type of weather, but especially in tough winter conditions, and emotionally knowing that the men he was caring for and carrying could no longer hang on to life –and that there was no medical treatment to keep them going until the war was over. Dad always complained about his frost bitten feet and he could put pins in parts of his legs/feet and show that there was no feeling. His large and wide feet could not properly fit in any shoes. After the war, he had bunions that grew to a couple of inches and to help lessen the pain we would cut holes in all of his shoes. Dad’s complaints were not about sympathy for him – but to let us know what had happened. He knew he was one of the fortunate ones who could return home and return with his body intact. We had looked for the cemetery when we took Dad on the War journey back in the late 1980’s. In fact it was the last thing we did, and then filled with anger he was ready for us to leave Siegburg. His disappointment was so intense and he bemoaned the fact that there was no cross or anything symbolizing the sacrifices the Americans had made at where he thought the cemetery might have been. His anger was fueled by the fact the folks at the Abbey denied that a POW Camp had been there, and the folks in the center of the City denied it also. Thanks to Christoph and his research he was convinced that the cemetery we were walking to was the cemetery in question. Christoph explained pointing to the map at the entrance to the cemetery the section where the Americans had been buried - and that none were there now. He also pointed out the area where the Russians were buried and that they still remain there. He was correct! The discovery of the cemetery and all of the work Christoph has done is an immeasurable gift from Christoph to my Dad and all of the men who passed through the Lazarett at Siegburg!!! The dream eventually had to end – it got later and later and I knew Christoph would have to leave… But the memories of it all are etched in my brain forever! And especially the memories of what an INCREDIBLE MAN Christoph is!!!! I can’t wait to return, and Marion it is all because of you and your efforts and dedication to all facets of the war that I found Christoph who then solved 70 year old mysteries! Marion, you too are an INCREDIBLE LADY and how proud your Dad has to be!!!! I am a Member of Both of Your Fan Clubs, Jean
  7. 3 points
    Good day, I am currently serving as Captain with the U.S. Army and would like to try and build some of my family's military history ties. My grandfather was Gust Mihal, from Dubuque, Iowa, who commanded the 1035th Engineer detachment in France and the Pacific in WW2. I have not been able to find much information on this elusive unit, and pops never spoke about the war. After he passed, we found a Silver Star in a drawer in his basement, but have been unable to get the citation since. After the war he achieved the rank of Colonel in the reserves and spent twenty years teaching at the Engineer School at Fort Belvoir from 1957-1977. I was curious if anyone knew him, or at least had family that knew him, or any of his many brothers and cousins that fought in the war (Mihals were at Bastogne and pretty much all over the European theater). It's a long shot, I know, but if anyone knew what he did during the war I would love to know. Thank you to everyone in advance, Chris
  8. 3 points
    This is a pretty old thread, and I'm a newbie to this site. My dad was a staff sergeant in A Co., 368th GS Regiment. He didn't talk too much about his WWII experiences, other than he "pumped gas for Patton". I've since learned that the 368th was one of the engineering units that constructed and operated the major POL pipeline across northern France. I was told some time ago that there was no unit history for the 368th. Dave mentioned that he found unit histories in the NARA facility in Maryland.. I'd be interested to see if he was able to find anything about the 368th there. Thanks! Bill Darrow
  9. 3 points
    Walt's Daughter

    Good to be back

    And the emoticons are now working too, but have to try and find all the other ones I added. Ah, baby-steps there, woman!
  10. 3 points
    Wee Willie

    Wee Willie

    These are some pictures that my father in law had stashed away. I am assuming that he was in the 1058th because of the pictures, but all of his records were lost in the fire of 1973. In the one picture with his buddies in a bar or something, George Brannon is the one on the far right. I have no idea who the others are. The picture where they are sitting on a dock or bridge, George is in the center front. I have a lot more pictures, and will probably post them later. Most appear to be official Army photos that were badly copied.
  11. 3 points
    Here we go folks! Just another 'lil project I've been working on. Opinions? Gary
  12. 3 points
    It's arrived! Now to get 'er framed! Gary
  13. 3 points
    Well, the resolution is 7200x9600 and is thus scaled for an 18x24 poster and it should print with no issue. I had a question from someone wondering why I used 292d and not 292nd. I did it because in the unit documents that I have it was 292d. However, the map has 292nd in the body of the text so I created a second version with 292nd for anyone who would prefer that version. Gary
  14. 3 points
    Sure thing. As far as the loved one, that's something I have to write about to you in private. It's a longgggg story... Here's where the image hangs among others. This is one wall in our entertainment room.
  15. 3 points
    Meanwhile in the Pacific, the Stars and Stripes is raised on Mt Suribachi on the island of Iwo Jima. Here is the first flag raising, the smaller first flag being replaced by the second larger flag and the iconic Joe Rosenthal photo of the second flag raising.
  16. 2 points
    buk2112

    Remembering Bryl G. Bowman

    Thinking today of the service and sacrifice of Seaman 2nd Class Bryl G. Bowman, who went missing in action on this date 75 years ago. Seaman Bowman was a crew member aboard the USS Houston, which on 1 March 1942 was caught in a desperate battle with the Japanese fleet and was sunk off of the Java coast. Of the 1061 men aboard the Houston, 693 perished. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Houston_(CA-30) http://www.click2houston.com/news/ceremonies-mark-75th-anniversary-of-uss-houston-sinking On this 75th anniversary, here is to all the sailors of the USS Houston "still on duty"
  17. 2 points
  18. 2 points
    repbrock

    344th Engineers

    I have more photos, which I can post. Hope it's not too much. Would very much like to know if there are any living members of the 113th or 344? Can you link this to 344th?
  19. 2 points
    repbrock

    344th Engineers

    I have a number of photos which I believe we taken both here in the US and overseas. Happy to share them.
  20. 2 points
    msmith

    Vet doing research

    I'm Matt, combats engineer vet from 1996-2002, doing research on my grandfather who I never knew but have tons of photos, some not labeled, from the ETO. He was a comms T4 in the 33rd reconnaissance squadron, 20th armored division, 3rd Army. It has proved quite a Challenge to ID some of these places, at the time my grandad was in Europe, February thru July 1945, his unit was splintered and pieces attached to other units, so it can be hard to know where he went based on official narratives. Mom not here to crowdsource or just post and hope others do the work, but I am relatively new at this sort of research. Any tips would be appreciated. Included is a photo of my grandfather, Gordon Smith Essayons!
  21. 2 points
    Great information! Thank you for sharing. Since posting this, I found out that my father was first in the 87th Infantry Division, Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 345th Infantry Regiment. I found the paperwork on the 87thInfantrydivision.com web site and that is when he received his Combat Infantryman's Badge. I am still learning about all the different divisions, infantries, regiments, battalions, etc.
  22. 2 points
    buk2112

    New Battle of Britain film announced

    Ran across an article this morning announcing a new film about the Battle of Britain, let's hope it is a good one. Randy Sir Ridley Scott set to direct Battle of Britain film By Celebretainment Sir Ridley Scott is attached to direct a film about the Battle of Britain. The 79-year-old British filmmaker - who is renowned for his work on sci-fi films, 'Blade Runner, 'Prometheus' and 'Alien' - has reportedly teamed up with 20th Century Fox to helm the World War II movie which is based on the historical battle. According to Deadline, Scott will work closely with its screenwriter Matthew Orton, who penned WWII drama 'Operational Finale' starring Oscar Isaac, on the project. It is not yet known what direction the script will take but the Battle of Britain is centered from 10 July until 31 October 1940 when the British Royal Air Force (RAF) successfully defended the UK from the invading German Air Force (Luftwaffe) as the Nazis tried to cripple and the conquer the country with a bombing campaign known as the Blitz. The film rights were purchased by Fox last year and Scott Free is down to produce alongside Joby Harold, Tory Tunnell, with Steven Asbell on board for Fox. Steven Spielberg's 'Bridge of Spies' writer, Matt Charman, will executive produce the film. He has worked with Orton on 'Guiding Lights' back in 2015. Meanwhile, Orton is currently writing political thriller 'Reason of State', with Scott in charge of Sony's 'All The Money In The World' - a drama about the kidnapping of John Paul Getty III. In addition to 'The Cartel' and his next movie to hit cinema screens is 'Alien: Covenant' which is released on May 19 followed by its sequel scheduled for 2018. Scott - who is married to Costa Rican actress-and-producer Giannina Facio - also worked as a producer on 'Blade Runner 2049', the Denis Villeneuve-directed sequel to his 1982 cult classic.
  23. 2 points
    buk2112

    Farewell William Liebenow

    Naval officer and PT boat commander William "Bud" Liebenow passed away Friday February 24th, 2017 at age 97. It was him and his crew that rescued future President John F. Kennedy and the rest of the PT-109 survivors in 1943. http://www.stltoday.com/news/national/wwii-navy-officer-who-helped-rescue-kennedy-dies-at-age/article_bd313c11-3700-5b6a-a844-953a1fc972e9.html Thank you for your service to our country sir, rest in peace.
  24. 2 points
    CaptO

    Engineer Week and the GPO

    I subscribe to the Government Publishing Office (GPO) emails to get info on the books that they are featuring - every now and then they are WWII ones. Today's email was about engineer books since it is - apparently - Engineer Week. Who knew? Apparently, it coincides with the week of George Washington's birthday. This year it is February 19-25. The email I got sent me to "Government Book Talk" for Engineer Week. As for the GPO, they are the place you can buy your brand new versions of the US Army's Green Books about WWII. For Christmas, I bought the Okinawa green book (with a picture on the cover and no longer green), some posters and a few small publications. Very cool. Anyway, it's pretty easy to navigate around the book store site. The search is ok but you will get a lot of results that don't have anything to do with your search parameters. Here is a search for "Engineers World War II" https://bookstore.gpo.gov/search/apachesolr_search/engineer world war ii Great place for government published books that are hard to get elsewhere. Looking for the Green Books on PDF. . . and for free? http://www.history.army.mil/html/bookshelves/collect/usaww2.html
  25. 2 points
    I haven't said this enough recently, but Randy Clark (aka Buk2112) is one heck of a guy! He'll selflessly help anyone with anything and the world would surely be a much better place if there we many more like him! Just my two cents worth... Gary
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