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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/07/12 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    I meant to post this at the time but you know, stuff happens! Gave my dad the "We Clear The Way" poster I had made for his birthday May 10th. I explained to him the history behind the poster and the modifications Gary had made to it. He liked it a lot and was happy to have one. One comment he made about it, he thought the gentlemen (Vincent Leckey) in the poster looked like George C. Scott from the movie "Patton". Which I can see a resemblance, LOL! He has proudly put the poster on display in his barbershop where he has worked for the last 56 years now, the man will just not retire! He has told me that he has received many comments from customers about the poster. Below is a pic the day we gave it to him. Another shout out to Gary for a job well done on the poster ,thanks Gary! Have a good one everybody! Randy
  2. 4 points
    After a lot of encouragement at the 2017 reunion, I have decided to resume production in January 2018. Why the long delay since the release of part one? To be honest, it was due to lack of funding and secondly lack of time. Funding was the primary reason!
  3. 3 points
    For all of you I miss via snail mail, here's my Christmas poem to everyone! From our family to yours.
  4. 3 points
    Oh awesome! In a brief search I discovered a discussion from last year about a couple members donating 292nd yard longs to our museum! They both hang proudly and I will have to get a picture of them on display the next time I'm up there.
  5. 3 points
    My father was a diver for the 1053rd. Did the the ETO and wound up in the Philippians at war's end. Second from left, bottom row, Mike Sokoloff.
  6. 3 points
    I am proud to have this (modern) poster hanging on my office wall. It came from my association with the 36th Combat Engineers Regiment over the last 14 years and attendance at their reunions. Colin.
  7. 3 points
    WWII finds vehicle he drove in WWII How cool is this? World War II Veteran Locates Ambulance He Drove During the War
  8. 3 points
    CaptO

    D-Day Normandy - 2017

    Hear, hear!!
  9. 3 points
    Christoph

    Jean in Siegburg

    Yesterday I recieved a surprising message from my old internet friend Jean Jacobsen: She's visiting Siegburg with her hubby Steve! So we went up the Michaelsberg to the rose garden, to the Nordfriedhof, where her father had to bring passed american POW to, the synagogue monument... Thanks to Marion who made this possible!
  10. 3 points
    colinhotham

    Jean in Siegburg

    This is a reason for this great website's existence and what it does so well. As always the final credit goes to Marion. Colin.
  11. 3 points
    Jean Jacobson

    Jean in Siegburg

    Where to begin: I had the most incredible experience recently when finally I met the brilliant, kind, and generous Christoph! For me nothing will ever compare to this encounter – it was out of a dream…. I finally met the real “Christoph.” Brilliant, kind and generous do not really begin to describe what a wonderful human being he is! On his own time he has helped solve the mysteries of a critically important and life changing period in my Dad’s life and it is something my Dad wanted solved. And Marion, what a surprise to find in addition to all of the wonderful ways Christoph could be described – he is also very handsome! Marion, wait until you meet him! I want to adopt him! It really was out of a dream – we met in the center of the town, and then together with my husband, Steve, we walked up the hill to the Abbey! We all saw for the first time the new addition to the Abbey. I understand the folks that now own the Abbey needed more space and they came up with a modern addition. It is possibly the best design that could have been done. But for me the majesty and spirit of the Abbey that was over 1000 years old, was changed forever with this new addition. The 3 of us walked the now rose garden where some prisoners from not only America but Russia and France (and as some POW’s referred to it – it was like the United Nations) survived in decrepit and small spaces. But remembering that so many were fortunate to survive is what it is all about. From the Abbey I finally had a chance to observe and walk the hill that I believe was the place Dad had described in a VMAIL home. I could now really understand and sympathize even more with Dad about his long, cold, and emotional journeys from the Abbey to the Cemetery. Christopher led us there!!! Can you believe it! We walked there just like Dad did. What a distance in any type of weather, but especially in tough winter conditions, and emotionally knowing that the men he was caring for and carrying could no longer hang on to life –and that there was no medical treatment to keep them going until the war was over. Dad always complained about his frost bitten feet and he could put pins in parts of his legs/feet and show that there was no feeling. His large and wide feet could not properly fit in any shoes. After the war, he had bunions that grew to a couple of inches and to help lessen the pain we would cut holes in all of his shoes. Dad’s complaints were not about sympathy for him – but to let us know what had happened. He knew he was one of the fortunate ones who could return home and return with his body intact. We had looked for the cemetery when we took Dad on the War journey back in the late 1980’s. In fact it was the last thing we did, and then filled with anger he was ready for us to leave Siegburg. His disappointment was so intense and he bemoaned the fact that there was no cross or anything symbolizing the sacrifices the Americans had made at where he thought the cemetery might have been. His anger was fueled by the fact the folks at the Abbey denied that a POW Camp had been there, and the folks in the center of the City denied it also. Thanks to Christoph and his research he was convinced that the cemetery we were walking to was the cemetery in question. Christoph explained pointing to the map at the entrance to the cemetery the section where the Americans had been buried - and that none were there now. He also pointed out the area where the Russians were buried and that they still remain there. He was correct! The discovery of the cemetery and all of the work Christoph has done is an immeasurable gift from Christoph to my Dad and all of the men who passed through the Lazarett at Siegburg!!! The dream eventually had to end – it got later and later and I knew Christoph would have to leave… But the memories of it all are etched in my brain forever! And especially the memories of what an INCREDIBLE MAN Christoph is!!!! I can’t wait to return, and Marion it is all because of you and your efforts and dedication to all facets of the war that I found Christoph who then solved 70 year old mysteries! Marion, you too are an INCREDIBLE LADY and how proud your Dad has to be!!!! I am a Member of Both of Your Fan Clubs, Jean
  12. 3 points
    Good day, I am currently serving as Captain with the U.S. Army and would like to try and build some of my family's military history ties. My grandfather was Gust Mihal, from Dubuque, Iowa, who commanded the 1035th Engineer detachment in France and the Pacific in WW2. I have not been able to find much information on this elusive unit, and pops never spoke about the war. After he passed, we found a Silver Star in a drawer in his basement, but have been unable to get the citation since. After the war he achieved the rank of Colonel in the reserves and spent twenty years teaching at the Engineer School at Fort Belvoir from 1957-1977. I was curious if anyone knew him, or at least had family that knew him, or any of his many brothers and cousins that fought in the war (Mihals were at Bastogne and pretty much all over the European theater). It's a long shot, I know, but if anyone knew what he did during the war I would love to know. Thank you to everyone in advance, Chris
  13. 3 points
    This is a pretty old thread, and I'm a newbie to this site. My dad was a staff sergeant in A Co., 368th GS Regiment. He didn't talk too much about his WWII experiences, other than he "pumped gas for Patton". I've since learned that the 368th was one of the engineering units that constructed and operated the major POL pipeline across northern France. I was told some time ago that there was no unit history for the 368th. Dave mentioned that he found unit histories in the NARA facility in Maryland.. I'd be interested to see if he was able to find anything about the 368th there. Thanks! Bill Darrow
  14. 3 points
    Walt's Daughter

    Good to be back

    And the emoticons are now working too, but have to try and find all the other ones I added. Ah, baby-steps there, woman!
  15. 3 points
    Wee Willie

    Wee Willie

    These are some pictures that my father in law had stashed away. I am assuming that he was in the 1058th because of the pictures, but all of his records were lost in the fire of 1973. In the one picture with his buddies in a bar or something, George Brannon is the one on the far right. I have no idea who the others are. The picture where they are sitting on a dock or bridge, George is in the center front. I have a lot more pictures, and will probably post them later. Most appear to be official Army photos that were badly copied.
  16. 3 points
    Here we go folks! Just another 'lil project I've been working on. Opinions? Gary
  17. 3 points
    It's arrived! Now to get 'er framed! Gary
  18. 3 points
    Well, the resolution is 7200x9600 and is thus scaled for an 18x24 poster and it should print with no issue. I had a question from someone wondering why I used 292d and not 292nd. I did it because in the unit documents that I have it was 292d. However, the map has 292nd in the body of the text so I created a second version with 292nd for anyone who would prefer that version. Gary
  19. 3 points
    Sure thing. As far as the loved one, that's something I have to write about to you in private. It's a longgggg story... Here's where the image hangs among others. This is one wall in our entertainment room.
  20. 3 points
    Meanwhile in the Pacific, the Stars and Stripes is raised on Mt Suribachi on the island of Iwo Jima. Here is the first flag raising, the smaller first flag being replaced by the second larger flag and the iconic Joe Rosenthal photo of the second flag raising.
  21. 2 points
    The "prodigal son" returns! My apologies folks for the long absence. Been taking care of my 101 year young grandmother (will be 102 on Thanksgiving) and things have been a bit complicated. So what's new with everybody? Let's get that 292nd fervor back as people pass and information disappears forever. Randy, glad your Pops liked the gift you gave him. That poster is wonderful. Glad I could assist all who have downloaded the image. Sam, how's our friend from Florida? Kent, that jacket is fantastic. What a family heirloom, my friend! Marion, I hope the book goes well! Until next time (and that doesn't mean months from now ), Gary
  22. 2 points
    Boy, time flies. Last time I posted was over a year ago! There are some things I've been meaning to post for a while, but life keeps getting the way. I thought with Veteran's Day coming up it would be appropriate time. I still have my father's old Ike jacket and I thought it would be interesting to post some pictures of his patches and ribbons. The first photo is of the ribbons above the left pocket. From top to bottom, left to right: 1. WW II Victory ribbon 2. Army Good Conduct ribbon 3. WW II American Campaign ribbon The second photo is the honorable discharge patch above the right pocket, also called the "Ruptured Duck" . "This patch was issued to discharged soldiers to be work above the right pocket flap. This allowed soldiers to wear their uniforms while traveling home and not get ordered around by an officer." The third photo is the Engineer Special Brigade patch on the left shoulder. "The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Engineer Amphibian Units on 17 June 1942. It was redesignated for all Army personnel assigned to the following amphibian units: Amphibian Tank Battalions; Amphibian Tractor Battalions; Engineer Amphibian Units; Joint Assault Signal Companies; Headquarters Ships Detachments (Type A); Headquarters Ships Detachment (Type B); Headquarters Section (Army); and Amphibian Training Command - Pacific Fleet on 10 June 1944. The insignia was redesignated for the 1st Engineer Brigade and amended to update the description and add a symbolism on 20 July 2007." The fourth photo is the 13th Army Corps patch on the right shoulder. The 13th corps was activated on 12/7/1942 and fought for 180 days in the European Theater of Operations. Wikipedia gives a good history of the corps. You may have noticed that the patch is swen on upside-down. I got a laugh out of this since my father could sometimes be dyslexic about things like that. I can just hear him saying, "The heck with it. I'm not going to sew it on again!" That is, assuming he is the one that sewed it on, but it wouldn't surprise me. The last photo is the lower left sleeve which has the three stripes for six months of service each and his private's stripe.
  23. 2 points
    Guess who!!!??? LOL... long time no see or talk everyone... yes, I mentioned the boys who gave support and got the beans, the bullets and the gasoline to the U.S. Army personnel on time, on target and kept it coming. These boys have been forgotten in the greater picture of the ground war in the Mediterranean. I have since switched branches and now I hit for the United States Navy. I love the United States 3rd Infantry Division and the beloved U.S. 30th Infantry Regiment but, in 2013 my life and time took a turn to some forgotten men. Those brave men, walked the decks of the ships that brought the U.S. Army personnel to those hostile shores and cleared the waves on land and sea to make each and every landing a reality. I've been away, hard at work bringing their story to light for the public. I went to work at Ships of The Sea Maritime Museum here in Savannah, Georgia and I wouldn't trade a moment of it. I LOVE my work, especially lighting up visitors faces when I research their family's relatives and bring their service to light for them in real time. I focus primarily on a ship named after my hometown of Savannah, U.S.S. Savannah, CL-42. A remarkable ship and crew, and its saddens me that I had to go back to the museum to remind me of this fact. However, its been a journey, better yet one heck of an adventure to bring her and her crews service to light. I now run a page of Facebook to her and her crews honor. Just look up "U.S.S. Savannah, CL-42" I have TONS of documents, photos and family members of the ships crew on there. I'm also in the process of finally pulling the trigger and writing a book on the U.S.S. Savannah, CL-42 to make sure her and her crew are not forgotten. It will cover EVERYTHING, her conception in 1933 via Senators Carl Vinson and Park Trammell, to the bombing of September 11th, 1943 at Salerno, to her escort duty for the Yalta Conference to her sad scrapping in January, 1966 at Bethlehem Steel. I think we need a section dedicated here to them, to the United States Navy. For without them, victory, let alone the ground campaign wouldn't have become a reality. Regards, MARNE
  24. 2 points
    Farewell Donald Burgett - 101st Airborne Well another veteran friend has passed on. He died last evening at 6 PM, after a long and wonderful life. I'm pleased to say I got to meet up with him several times, including having the wonderful opportunity to spend a couple of weekends at he and Twyla's home here in Michigan. Also went to several 101st Airborne meetings in Farmington Hills, MI, where he, Don Straith, and George Kosimaki, (among others) were in attendance. Rest in peace, my friend!
  25. 2 points
    Wow Gary, that's some pretty high praise there. Not sure if I'm worthy of all that but thanks for the thought! Randy
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