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      New Registrations   09/22/17

      Attention New Registrants - Please take a moment to read the section on REGISTRATION. This will inform you regarding the entire process and hopefully answer all your questions. Too often I receive emails either asking why you can't post yet, or I why I haven't approved your membership?  Thank you for your time, M1
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      Research Assistance Donations   11/23/17

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    • Walt's Daughter

      The Story of Q Trilogy - Marion J Chard   12/02/17

      Completed my tween trilogy! Please share with your family and friends. www.storyofq.com


Popular Content

Showing most liked content on 01/03/18 in all areas

  1. 1 point

    Interesting Articles

    Plane that led Normandy invasion discovered, restored Dec 15, 2017 (0) This Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, photo shows a C-47 called "That's All, Brother," that was discovered and currently being restored at Basler Turbo Conversions in Oshkosh, Wis. The plane carried the first paratroopers who stormed the beaches of Normandy during World War II. The group, Commemorative Air Force, started a campaign to restore the relic with hopes to fly the aircraft over Normandy in 2019 for the 75th anniversary of D-Day.(WLUK/Alex Ronallo, via AP) OSHKOSH, Wis. (AP) — A plane that led the invasion of Normandy during World War II has been saved from a junkyard and is being carefully restored in Wisconsin. The C-47, called "That's All, Brother," carried the first paratroopers who were dropped behind German lines at Normandy. The aircraft led the more than 800 other C-47s also carrying paratroopers. The plane was lost for 70 years and was accidentally discovered by an Air Force historian at the Basler Turbo Conversions junkyard in Oshkosh in 2015, WLUK-TV reported . The historian was researching Col. John Donalson, the man who flew the plane on D-Day. "The airplane is much more than an aircraft. It's a time machine," said Keegan Chetwynd, the curator for the Commemorative Air Force, a nonprofit that works to preserve aircraft. The group started a campaign to restore the aircraft, raising about $380,000 in 30 days, Chetwynd said. Employees at Basler have spent more than 22,000 hours restoring "That's All, Brother" to former glory. "(It) provides that tangible connection for the next generation of people so that they know, when they read it in a history book, that it was real," Chetwynd said. Workers tested out "That's All, Brother's" engines for the first time in a decade on Thursday. Despite a hydraulic leak, the test was a major achievement, Chetwynd said. Crews will test the engines again today. Their hope is to fly the aircraft over Normandy in 2019 for the 75th anniversary of D-Day. "That's kind of why the rush is on and why we're doing all of this in the dead of winter in Wisconsin," Chetwynd said. The aircraft is expected to conduct a European tour in 2019 and then will likely return to the U.S. to resume regular operations.
  2. 1 point

    Interesting Articles

    The DPAA (http://www.dpaa.mil/) are really unsung heroes of our day. Every week I am hearing about US servicemen being returned to the US after being missing for 75 or more years. It is truly remarkable. I am glad that we in the US still have the will and desire to search for all of our missing servicemen.