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  1. 2 points
    Walt's Daughter

    Normandy D-Day

    I ask on this day that you not only remember all the men who made sacrifices on this day in history, but please do not forget all those who were already fighting in North Africa, Sicily, Italy, Greece, etc. Many units, such as my dad's regiment, the 540th, had been engaged since 1942. There were many D-Days around the world including numerous campaigns in the Pacific. Here's to all of them! Thank you!
  2. 2 points
    Mack

    Ruben Cohen - 38th Engineer

    I am thrilled to hear from Robert "Bob" Duffy's son. After Colonel Coughlin, my father (mhrip) talked about your dad more than anyone else in the 38th. He also wasn't the kind of person who dished out compliments fairly easy, so this was HIGH PRAISE. Even in his 90's he remembered your father as the band organizer and was its leader. Did you attend any of the reunions in the 60's and 70's? The one that still stays with me was at Ft. Belvoir. Till this day the image of the 38th hugging each other like they were family members has never left me. I have never seen my father embrace family members like he did that afternoon. I even shook a generals hand though I have no idea who the person was. Thank you for brightening my day as I still try to find out new information about the 38th and its history. If you ever feel like talking about what my father taught me and other things about the 38th I would love to hear from you. As far as I know, William Moore is still alive at age 100+. I briefly email with his daughter about once a year and the last time she told me his memory is starting to fade which is to be expected to a person that age. When I spoke to him our conversation lasted almost two hours and it wasn't filled with "fluff". He is an amazing man that keeps the story of the 38th alive and still in the conversation. Below is one of my favorite pictures that were taken away from battle yet means a great deal to me. My dad used to tell me how he would give away a significant amount of his rations to the local population. As you can see many of the people from that era were emaciated. To me, this was another side of the war that never really was written about strongly. Human compassion meant a lot to my dad and all the members of the 38th. Even though this picture is almost 75 years old it carries a great message. GOOD will almost always TRIUMPH over evil though it might take some time.
  3. 2 points
    Sarge

    Ruben Cohen - 38th Engineer

    I know this is an old post but I'm happy to reply. My dad is the same Bob Duffy that is mentioned. In the photos, the second one, he is standing to the right on the stage,with an ever present cigarette. I have some of his scrapbook savings, and would love to hear from anyone with information to share. The band was called "The Wideawakes"
  4. 2 points
    Woodymyster

    292nd Map

    Hi everyone, I recently registered to give some info on this topic. I have the map shown in this thread in my collection and can answer buk2112 question as to who the artist was. The map is labeled as "Art work done by Chris G. Hafenbrack". I know this is an old topic, but thought I would add this bit if anyone was interested. -Woody
  5. 1 point
    Good day. Thanks for the add. I’m the maternal great nephew of Ralph Patterson who died in Europe in April 1945. I have no info on his service other than that. Hoping being a part of this group will add to enlightenment. Have a great day.
  6. 1 point
    Hello, new guy here. Hoping to uncover information on my father, who enlisted in the National Guard at Cleveland Ohio, 07 JUL 1940, activated 15 OCT 1940. I have his WD AGO 53-55, which indicates he was with Hdq Serv Co, 291st Combat Eng Bn when separated 12 OCt 1945. Prior to that I believe he was with the 112th Combat Engineers, and sent to Ireland 14 May 1942. I know that he eventually ended up at Saunton Sands, as he married my mother, a British girl, there in January 1944. She is now 96, and has Alzheimer's, but from what she tells me, I believe he helped build the training center there, and was at Slapton Sands during Exercise Tiger. His address on their marriage license is simply "Newquay." I would greatly appreciate anyone who can help fill in the gaps.
  7. 1 point
    Welcome to the forum. I can put you in direct contact with my 291st email list. I will do that for you today.
  8. 1 point
    buk2112

    Normandy D-Day

    Well said Marion, salute to them all!
  9. 1 point
    theron

    505 coast artillery

    Hi all: It has been a few years (1980's or so) since I did this, but here is another idea: Another possible source of discharge papers: Try the County clerk's Office on the county of residence of the soldier AT THE TIME OF THE WAR. After the war, States often paid a bonus to any veteran who filed his/her discharge with the County of Residence. Many counties still hold these records. Sometimes there is a charge of a few dollars for a copy. Some States hold these records in the State Capitol; A few States limit access to these records to next of Kin. If I remember correctly, Illinois does this. Incidentally, as part of my Ph.D thesis research, I obtained some 195 discharge records this way. I started out with an old address book one veteran had kept and went from there. Tedious, but this was before days of the internet and White Pages etc.
  10. 1 point
    Hello, I just posted my introduction in another thread but I should mention a little here too. I am the curator for the Camp Butner Society and Museum in Butner, North Carolina. I am hoping to locate any histories, digital PDF yearbooks and/or rosters from the engineer units that were at the camp. We are lucky that we have the original quartermaster's log in which he noted all the units that came through which as far as we know, is complete. The other reason I am hoping to find rosters is because of something very special to us. In the museum we have a little over 800 identified dog tags that have been dug up over the years at the camp. I have cataloged every one and there are 19 soldiers that were killed in action. In the database, I am trying to determine which units each soldier was in and I currently have 30-40% confirmed. It is the smaller units that are hard to determine so rosters would be VERY helpful. These are the engineer units that were at Camp Butner. Some might have been here for inactivation after the war but not positive which ones as I write this post. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. I can be contacted through here, at butner.museum@gmail.com or our facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/CampButnerSociety Thanks so much! Michael 60th Engineer Bn (35th Infantry Div) 303rd Engineer Bn (78th Infantry Div) 314th Engineer Cbt Bn (89th Infantry Div) 1133rd Engineer HQ and HQ Co 1135th Engineer (Com) Group 1144th Engineers 1318th Engineer Regt 1318th Engineer Regt (GS) 1319th Engineer Regt (GS) 1324th Engineer cadre 1489th Engineer Maint Co 1556th Engineer Cbt Co 1564th Engineer DT Co 1699th Engineer Bn 281st Engineers 282nd Engineers 283rd Engineers 31st Engineer C Bn 389th Engineer Regt (GS) 414th Engineer Dump Truck Co. 500th Engineers LP Co. 602nd Engineer Cam. Bn. 632nd Engineer Co. 762nd Engineer LE Co 764th Engineer Dump Truck Co. 765th Engineer Dump Truck Co. 770th Engineer Dump Truck Co. 972nd Engineer Co. HQ 1112th Engineer Group
  11. 1 point
    Mack

    Ruben Cohen - 38th Engineer

    I vividly recall Lancaster maybe because there was so much for a kid to do. We stayed at a motel called the Congress Inn and went to an amusement park called Dutch Wonderland. I just checked and both of them are still in business today! Researching the 38th I came up with a bunch of references that wrote about the “38th less band”. I don’t think my father was in that band because he was all over Europe including the battle of the bulge. The 38th must have been really split up because William Moore states that he was held in reserve and didn’t have to join the battle. But on other web pages, other soldiers they said they participated in it. Here is the youtube link of him talking about the 38 th. If you want I will post all the links I have about the 38th. If Marion gives her nod of approval I would like to share all the great photos she has on here posted on here and hope for a larger audience on Pinterest. In 1958 they were even mentioned in the New York Times about a reunion in Manhattan. The Times can be fairly strict about copyright issues but I guess they won’t bring me up on charges if I leave it up for a few days. I’m talking too much, but here is some Lancaster info that I gathered searching around the web. Please let me know if you want to see the NYT piece if you are trying to look back in time.
  12. 1 point
    Good morning, It's been a while since I've posted but wanted to provide an update on the museum progress. We are certainly running strong and never seem to slow down! The last weekend of April saw 20 volunteers from a local metal detecting club assist us with finding new artifacts for the museum. We spent the entire day in two locations and when we were done, 18 more dog tags were discovered. After researching the owners, I found the units for about half of them. Of those, 1 belonged to the 1019th Engineer Treadway Bridge Company, 1 was with the 31st Engineer Combat Bn, and 1 with the 281st Engineer Combat Bn. We already have 3 dog tags in the archives of soldiers from the 60th Engineer Cbt Bn (35th ID) and 1 from the 314th (89th ID). I haven't found much for rosters since my post in December but I did just find the 31st Eng Cbt Bn. I am converting it from a pdf to a searchable excel document like I am doing with all our rosters. For each battalion sized roster converted, it takes at least 6 hours of work to correct any OCR errors. So if anyone has a battalion yearbook that has a roster in the back (and they were at Camp Butner) we would be very interested in quality scans of those pages and would be happy to share the completed excel file! Mike
  13. 1 point
    theron

    505 coast artillery

    Hi... 1. did you try NARA's contact in College Park, MD? The fire burned individuals' files and some morning reports, but NOT unit records. They are at College Park, MD. Contact them via their web site. 2. I found the following: August 2009 The Coast Defense Journal Page 73 505th Coast Artillery (AA) Regiment (Mobile) Activated in AUS 6-1-42 at Cp. Edwards, MA, and moved to Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, PA, 11-29-42 and staged for overseas deployment. Departed NYC POE 12-8-42, arrived England 12-13-42. Moved to North Africa 3-4-43 and landed in Salerno, Italy, 9-9-43. Inactivated Santa Maria, Italy, 3-14-44. HHB redesignated HHB 505th AAA Gp; 1st Bn redesignated 87th AAA (Gun) Bn; 2nd Bn redesignated 900th AAA (AW) Bn; 3rd Bn disbanded. 3. Given that the unit was reorganized, it is likely that many individuals were reassigned to other branches. That's how my father went from AAA to Combat Engineers. 4. (Maybe your best bet) You should also contact the VA and request your Dad's VA file. I think they are separate from the files in St. Louis. You are entitled to it as next of kin. That file has all sorts of stuff in it (My father's had an evacuation tag from an incident when he was on active duty and was hurt). IT ALSO should contain enough paperwork that you can trace your father from unit to unit. I had access to several files during my Ph.D research...and was able to do so for several men...and these files came from various locations across the country. They were sent to my local VA clinic to allow me access.
  14. 1 point
    buk2112

    292nd Map

    Hi Woody, Welcome to the forum, we are glad to have you here with us. As Marion has stated nothing is old here, old is what we are all about! Sure appreciate the info, I suppose if I had examined it in more detail I would have picked up on that, I must be slipping! After I get home from work I'm going to look to see if I can locate his name in the records I have, as to which company he may have belonged to. I do not have a complete roster but I have many names, maybe I'll get lucky. Woody be sure to tell us more about your collection, what items you have, if there are any family connections to them, what your interests are, etc. Thanks again for shining a light on this question. Randy
  15. 1 point
    Walt's Daughter

    Ruben Cohen - 38th Engineer

    I am so delighted to see this wonderful exchange between the two of you. This is what makes the forum a special place. Sometimes things fall together immediately. Sometimes it takes years, but the bonding still occurs. Warms my heart. Sarge, please note that NARA in St Louis isn't the only place to retrieve info on our loved ones. I obtained my father's discharge papers from his local VA. Please see my instructions on how to obtain information in my RESEARCH section. Hope that helps you.
  16. 1 point
    Sarge

    Ruben Cohen - 38th Engineer

    Hello Mack Thank you for the kind praise of my Dad. It’s a comfort to know he had such a profound effect on his military buddies. To be honest, I only knew that the unit had a band, but had no idea he was involved in its formation. It’s funny that you mention your dad kept a saxophone but never played it. My story is similar.. my dad played the piano and drums. I never knew this until recently. And only because I ran across a story in an old saved copy of a local civic associations newsletter that told of him playing for the neighborhood . My only musical memories of him are his playing “air”drums during movies when a big band played. I never really attended the reunions, as Mom and Pop usually went and left the kids to fend for themselves. I recall a few I went to in the 80s... Richmond Virginia, Lancaster Pennsylvania , and Canton Ohio. But yes I have to agree.... the closeness and love these men shared was incredible to witness. I have one photo of him at a reunion and the joy in his eyes is priceless. I’m sorry I didn’t realize how important it was at the time. I don’t really know much of his military story. He (like most of the greatest generation ) kept the stories to himself. Also, I came along later in his life and I guess whatever stories he did tell about being a soldier were already told. My loss. I know much more about his life after WWII. I have photos and I’m trying to decipher his written journal pages. They are yellow and faded, making it a slow process. And His records were destroyed in the Washington fires. Searching the internet hasn’t been very fruitful either. Every bit of new information is a surprise. I was always riding a motorcycle ... something he was against. Said I’d hurt myself. I recently found this photo of him
  17. 1 point
    I heard about this the other day. Very sad, but it is getting to be an older structure and has been hit by ships in the harbor before. Here are pictures of the Arizona memorial and the other things to see in Honolulu that I took on my visits: https://get.google.com/albumarchive/104745627018165888181/album/AF1QipPnVav3sfNyIxLvFIN5vKjt4P7FWQq89EakkIEF https://get.google.com/albumarchive/104745627018165888181/album/AF1QipNfx5RcBSAVCZ2P_8fHaQkoCGriF5xkD8Y1zvtM https://get.google.com/albumarchive/104745627018165888181/album/AF1QipMNRRgOs9ItPIdkM9ZF85K01-_TdYKUhdrtjqHw It's a lot to go through, but there is a lot to see. I'd post some highlights, but even the Google Photo Archive doesn't allow direct linking now (it used to). Have to find a new photo posting site!
  18. 1 point
    Walt's Daughter

    Ruben Cohen - 38th Engineer

    Well, isn't this cool! I just love when things like this transpire. If you want, simply click on Mack's username (when you are logged in) and send him a private message to make sure he knows about this. :-)
  19. 1 point
    I will ask him, I am surprised in what great physical and mental condition he still is at age 93. I will post some pictures on Facebook later on.
  20. 1 point
    The upcoming Memorial Day weekend I will be escorting Mr. Jack Frank. Jack served in the 1142nd CEG and was one of the men who also constructed the entrance roadd to the American cemetery in Margraten, The Netherlands. We will visit a school so he can talk to the kids, we will visit the ceremonies in Margraten and Henri-Chapelle, he will meet up with the guy who adopts the grave of one of his friends and of course we will visit the spot in Maastricht where they put up some pontoon bridges. If there is anybody wo has some questions, please let me know so I can ask them. Best wishes, Frank
  21. 1 point
    Maybe I can get him in touch with you Marion. I could give that a try.
  22. 1 point
    That is superb. How wonderful that both of you get the chance to do this. Please send him my love and respect.
  23. 1 point
    Oh awesome! In a brief search I discovered a discussion from last year about a couple members donating 292nd yard longs to our museum! They both hang proudly and I will have to get a picture of them on display the next time I'm up there.
  24. 0 points
    Another 292nd member has passed on Obituary: Wallace R. Simmons Posted on May 30, 2018 by Grace Tucker Obituary: Wallace R. Simmons Wallace Raymond Simmons, a longtime resident of Plainfield, passed away on May 20, 2018 in Signal Mountain, Tenn., at the age of 96. He was born June 26, 1921 in Detroit, Mich. Wallace is survived by his children Beverly Ann (H. Douglas) Kutz of Hixson, Tenn., and Wallace Randolph “Randy” (Nancy) Simmons of Newburgh, Ind.; grandchildren Jacob Aaron Simmons and Elizabeth (Dennis) Demaree; fond uncle to several nieces and nephews. He is preceded in death by his beloved wife of 62 years Ruth Simmons (nee Wheeler); parents June Putman Simmons Merritt and Walter Raymond Simmons; stepfather Elvis “Jack” Merritt; brother Paul Herbert Simmons; sister Carol Sue Hazelwood; stepbrother Jack Merritt. Wallace was born and raised in Detroit, MIch. During WWII, Wallace served in Company A 292nd Engineer Combat Battalion (Army), where he was involved in campaigns in the Rhineland and Central Europe. After the war, he met his future wife Ruth, attended the University of Michigan, and graduated with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering in 1949. Wallace and Ruth were married in the chapel of the Henry Ford Trade School on August 20, 1949, and started their married life in Illinois where he accepted a position with The Texas Company in Lockport. He joined Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1951. He earned a B.S. in Engineering Mathematics from the University of Michigan in 1951 and continued with postgraduate education at Illinois Institute of Technology, earning an M.S. in Mechanical Engineering in 1954. At ANL, his work focused on the development, design, and construction of nuclear components and facilities, and management and direction of programs and projects in support of the National Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. He especially enjoyed his work as Project Engineer for the design and construction of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary and steam systems, and maintained a lifelong interest in the EBR-II design. He retired in 1986 but continued to serve as a consultant for ANL until 2013. Wallace was an extraordinary, intelligent, talented, and very kind man who loved his family and his engineering work. He was well loved by many and will be deeply missed. The family is very grateful to the wonderful people at Alexian Health and Rehabilitation Center and Hospice of Chattanooga who cared for Wallace during the last few years. Family and friends to gather Saturday, June 2 for 9:30 a.m. visitation until time of funeral service 11 a.m. at Overman-Jones Funeral Home & Cremation Services 15219 S. Joliet Rd. Plainfield. Interment will follow at Plainfield Township Cemetery. For those wishing to leave a lasting tribute to Wallace’s memory, donations may be made to Hospice of Chattanooga, 4411 Oakwood Dr., Chattanooga, TN 37416, or Alexian Christmas Fund, 437 Alexian Way, Signal Mountain, TN 37377. For more information, please call (815)436-9221 or visit www.overmanjones.com. Farewell Mr. Simmons...
  25. 0 points
    USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor closed indefinitely
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