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    • Walt's Daughter

      Registration   07/18/17

      We currently have approximately 20 people who tried to register, but have not responded to the email I sent to you. Please note that unless I hear back from you, personally, I cannot approve your membership. Make sure that my email did not wind up in your SPAM folder.   
    • Walt's Daughter

      Upgrade July 26,2017   07/27/17

      We had an upgrade to the system this morning and I had to temporarily disable the theme/colors/look-feel of the forum. The forum was acting strangely and was moving along at a snails pace, so had to perform some tests. After I disabled all the customizations, things improved immensely, so... I am hoping to add our colors back, but till then...bear with me. Thanks!

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Showing most liked content since 06/28/17 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    I meant to post this at the time but you know, stuff happens! Gave my dad the "We Clear The Way" poster I had made for his birthday May 10th. I explained to him the history behind the poster and the modifications Gary had made to it. He liked it a lot and was happy to have one. One comment he made about it, he thought the gentlemen (Vincent Leckey) in the poster looked like George C. Scott from the movie "Patton". Which I can see a resemblance, LOL! He has proudly put the poster on display in his barbershop where he has worked for the last 56 years now, the man will just not retire! He has told me that he has received many comments from customers about the poster. Below is a pic the day we gave it to him. Another shout out to Gary for a job well done on the poster ,thanks Gary! Have a good one everybody! Randy
  2. 2 points
    Walt's Daughter

    293rd Engineer Combat Bn

    So sorry, Joe passed away in Jan of 2016. He was a great friend and I miss him very much. One of the sweetest and most humblest veterans, I knew.
  3. 2 points
    I am proud to have this (modern) poster hanging on my office wall. It came from my association with the 36th Combat Engineers Regiment over the last 14 years and attendance at their reunions. Colin.
  4. 2 points
    buk2112

    Interesting Articles

    Bones found near wreckage of US bomber in Croatia Jul 10, 2017 ZAGREB, Croatia (AP) — Divers have located human bones near the wreckage of a U.S. bomber that crashed in the Adriatic Sea in Croatia in 1944. The discovery was made last week at the site of the crash of The Tulsamerican, the last B-24 Liberator bomber built in Tulsa, Oklahoma, near the end of World War II, according to Croatia's state TV. "The remains of human bones have been found, but we can't say anything without further analysis," Zadar University archaeologist Mate Parica said. The wreckage itself was found at the bottom of the sea at a depth of some 40 meters (130 feet) near the island of Vis in 2010 after a 17-year search. Three members of the 10-man crew were killed in the crash. Tomo Medved, who heads Croatia's ministry for war veterans, said the U.S. is still looking for some 200 Americans who perished in Croatia during WWII. Croatia was run by a Nazi puppet regime during the war. Medved pledged the country's cooperation. "We will launch the procedure to sign an agreement between our countries so that we would find the remains of some 200 people that the United States is searching for in the territory of the Republic of Croatia," he said. An effort to recover and return pieces of the wreckage to Oklahoma for display at the Tulsa Air and Space Museum has been underway for several years. The plane was hit after a bombing run over German-occupied Poland. It crashed into the Adriatic Sea on Dec. 17, 1944. The crew apparently tried to get the plane back to its base in Italy, but they eventually decided to ditch it in the Adriatic.
  5. 2 points
    Great picture, thanks for sharing it with us! That is definitely a Thunderbird patch he is wearing, I'll give my thoughts on that in my next post. This photo would have probably been taken shortly before or after his time in service since he is wearing all of his service ribbons. Speaking of which, I don't know if you have noticed or not but he has on five ribbons instead of the four listed on his separation paper. Can not tell from the picture what the fifth one might be, another question! Not sure what the patch is above his right breast pocket either, that could provide another clue or yet another question. Take care, Randy
  6. 2 points
    Rmb2

    William "Bill" Brinkley (my grandfather)

    This is the other document I found.
  7. 2 points
    Rmb2

    William "Bill" Brinkley (my grandfather)

    Here is my grandfather's picture.
  8. 2 points
    WWII finds vehicle he drove in WWII How cool is this? World War II Veteran Locates Ambulance He Drove During the War
  9. 1 point
    pmanzie

    293rd Engineer Combat Bn

    My father was in Co. B, 2PLT. I posted pics of some of his buddies(unidentified)on the website previously
  10. 1 point
    buk2112

    Interesting Articles

    Just came across these great colorized photos from WWII on youtube, think you will enjoy them as much as I did. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0G6CVm6HMFE
  11. 1 point
    Forevrnte

    293rd Engineer Combat Bn

    DustyShelf: I was wondering about the short snorter that you have with my dad's signature. If you are ever thinking of selling it, can you please give me first crack at it. thank you Mark
  12. 1 point
    Forevrnte

    293rd Engineer Combat Bn

    Is Joe Izzilio still with us? I would love to know if he served with my father.
  13. 1 point
    Walt's Daughter

    The Cost of FREE Coffee?

    The Cost of FREE Doughnuts I've had several veterans tell me the same thing; they never did and never will donate a dime to the Red Cross. This is why!
  14. 1 point
    Sam

    1264th Engineer Combat Battalion

    It's been years since I last visited this forum. I recently found it again while researching the 1264th ECB for a history paper at school. Yes, I returned to college after being laid off from my job due to the company moving overseas. I mean, 55 isn't too old to graduate with a degree, is it? Anyway, I have been doing a LOT of research into the 1264th for this paper - I even found the notes from my meetings with Rex Pierce from 7 years ago. Sadly, he passed away a couple of years ago. I haven't yet turned in the final copy of this paper, but I have been asked permission for the college to retain an electronic copy of this paper as a resource. If you happen to spot any mistakes, PLEASE let me know ASAP. The sources are listed at the end - with the vast majority of the information was found via personal interviews or from the unit history itself. I tried to include as much information as possible - I even called the National Weather Service to obtain the weather information for Brownwood, Texas (Camp Bowie was located just south of Brownwood), on April 1, 1944. Enjoy...I hope this is informative for you. Do not copy without permission, please.
  15. 1 point
    Due to the nature of the beast, I often lose sight of so many things on my website. Today I was helping a staff sergeant in regards to the history of 36th and 540th. He wanted to know more about the tie-ins (relationship) of the two regiments. While conducting the research for him, I ran across numerous documents, including this one. It's an addendum from a man named Bill Herron, who was a member of the 540th Engineers (my dad's unit) and their official historian. I had talked with Bill on the phone a few times and he also sent me some letters/documentation. It was through him that I learned how disappointed and angered the men were, after they saw the official book on the 540th (printed in Germany, after the war). I have a copy of this book. Bill states, "I added this at the front of the 540th book - 'Overseas With the 540th Engineers'. This book was not very well liked my many members of the 540th, believe me! Sincerely, Bill Herron" In his Foreword he points out how the "book does not do justice to the accomplishments and experiences of the line companies of the regiment. The many hardships we endured, incidents of our invasion participations, our support of various infantry divisions. etc are barely touched upon or completely ignored..." It is a short document (several pages) and well worth the read, for it certainly adds so much. Taking over the job as historian for the unit, I too often wondered why 'Overseas With the 540th Engineers' made it look like a walk in the park, which it certainly was not!
  16. 1 point
    Ah, I forgot all about this one. I'm sure it's wrapped up with my several dozen other posters from the reunions. That's a really nice one.
  17. 1 point
    Hello All, My uncle, Cpl. Dean Belmonte, served in Co. C, 292nd Engineer Combat Battalion, XIII Corps, Ninth Army, during 1944-1945. His unit built bridges across the Roer River under fire during Operation Grenade, and supported the 84th, 102nd Infantry, and 5th Armored Divisions across the Rhine and Elbe Rivers. I have minimal info about the unit, and I am hoping to learn more about his particualr unit and Engineers in general. I am a retired Air Force officer and the author of a book, Italian Americans in World War II (Arcadia, 2001). I look forward to participating in these discussions. Thanks to all the veterans who are on this list, I appreciate your service to our country. Sincerely, Pete Belmonte O'Fallon, IL
  18. 1 point
    That is very cool. Love knowing that it's hanging in his barbershop. Great place for it, for it will get a lot of looks. Wonderful gift!
  19. 1 point
    buk2112

    William "Bill" Brinkley (my grandfather)

    Thanks for sharing this with us, these separation papers can of course provide important clues to answering questions. It appears to me that your grandfather started his military service with the 125th AEB and finished it with the 45th ID. The 125th AEB was deactivated at Camp Myles Standish on 19 Sept 1945, but according to your grandfather's separation paper he continued to serve stateside until 14 Nov 1945. The 45th ID might have been where he completed his service, hence the Thunderbird patch he is wearing in your photo. I also think that maybe he was transferred into the 45th ID before returning stateside because his return date to the US of 10 Sept 1945 is the same as the 45th ID's return to the Port of Boston. The 125th AEB did not return until a week later on 17 Sept 1945 and was deactivated two days later. The 45th ID was moved to Texas after reentering the US and later deactivated on 7 Dec 1945. This fits with your grandfather's separation at Camp Fannin Texas on 14 Nov 1945. This is just my theory, but I'm sticking to it! All units a soldier served with would not be reflected in the separation paper, that info would be contained in his personnel file which unfortunately may have been destroyed in the NPRC fire. Perhaps other clues will be found to support this theory. Has your family saved letters from your grandfather during this time period that may have address or unit information on the them? Just a thought. Have a good one! Randy
  20. 1 point
    buk2112

    William "Bill" Brinkley (my grandfather)

    A fellow Missourian, cool! The enlistment cards this online database is made up of was not affected by the infamous 1973 fire, however it is not 100% complete because many of these were handwritten and were not used in the database if all information was not readable. Luckily your grandfather's was included, some you search for may not be. There is no other online database that I know of where you can use his serial number to search for information. If your grandfather had been wounded or spent time in a VA Hospital, the VA Administration may have records. I would encourage you to go ahead and request your grandfather's personnel file from the NPRC in St. Louis. Yes, the fire destroyed most Army records but not all, fragments found in the aftermath have been used to try and reconstruct some files. It is my understanding this reconstruction work continues to this day. When I requested my grandfather's file the only item contained in it was a copy of his final pay voucher, it wasn't much but it still was an interesting item that had his signature on it. If your grandfather's file were to contain one of these vouchers, it may just show the unit in the 45th ID he belonged to. There is the chance that they may have nothing, but you will never know unless you ask. Here is a link to help you request that record, also check out the help section here on the forum for researching records. https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records/standard-form-180.html Good Luck! Randy
  21. 1 point
    buk2112

    William "Bill" Brinkley (my grandfather)

    Found this on WikiTree, think you will find this interesting. This gentlemen is talking about his father who was in the same Company A as your grandfather. "My father Carl William Bailey , was a member of the 125th Armored Engineers Battalion, Company-A, 3rd Platoon. Army Engineers fought in the front lines persistently ahead of the Infantry and Armored units. As a result, their casualties were comparable or higher then any other combat units. Twenty-two member of the 125th AEB would be killed in action, two would die due to non-combat accidents, fifteen would be captured by the enemy, one of which would die in captivity and one hundred and three would be wounded. Many of these seriously wounded requiring amputations. The 125th AEB was part of the 14th Armored Division. After World War II, it would be designated the “The Liberators”. The Division received this designation for liberating one hundred and ten thousand allied prisoners of war. They were also the first American troops to view the horror of a Concentration Camp at Natzweiler Struthof. In brutal fighting in France and Germany, the 14th Armored Division would engage and destroy three German Armies. The 14th Armored was part of the Seventh Army, commanded by Lt. Gen. Alexander M. Patch. They landed along the coast of Southern France in August of 1944 and advanced up the Rhone Valley in pursuit of the German 19th Army. By November 1944, the 7th Army was the leading Allied ground gainer on the Western Front. It was the first Allied Army to penetrate the German Reich. The 7th Army’s capture of Strasbourg and its pushed through the Vosges Mountains was one of the best planned and most difficult of all military operations during the European Campaign. In January 1945, the Seventh Army fended off the last organized German offensive in the West. It was a fierce defensive battle that would make the Province of Alsace, France the scene of some of the bloodiest combat in the European Theatre. My father was among those captured during the battles of the Ardennes-Alsace were Carl William." Here is the link where I found this, there is more I'm sure you will find interesting. https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Space:125th_Armored_Engineer_Battalion Have a good one! Randy
  22. 1 point
    buk2112

    William "Bill" Brinkley (my grandfather)

    I believe this is your grandfather from the online enlistment database. Field Title Value Meaning ARMY SERIAL NUMBER 37402689 37402689 NAME BRINKLEY#WILLIAM######## BRINKLEY#WILLIAM######## RESIDENCE: STATE 75 MISSOURI RESIDENCE: COUNTY 223 WAYNE PLACE OF ENLISTMENT 7545 JEFFERSON BARRACKS MISSOURI DATE OF ENLISTMENT DAY 08 08 DATE OF ENLISTMENT MONTH 12 12 DATE OF ENLISTMENT YEAR 42 42 GRADE: ALPHA DESIGNATION PVT# Private GRADE: CODE 8 Private BRANCH: ALPHA DESIGNATION BI# Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA BRANCH: CODE 00 Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA FIELD USE AS DESIRED # # TERM OF ENLISTMENT 5 Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law LONGEVITY ### ### SOURCE OF ARMY PERSONNEL 0 Civil Life NATIVITY 75 MISSOURI YEAR OF BIRTH 22 22 RACE AND CITIZENSHIP 1 White, citizen EDUCATION 0 Grammar school CIVILIAN OCCUPATION 830 Unskilled lumbermen, raftsmen, and woodchoppers MARITAL STATUS 6 Single, without dependents COMPONENT OF THE ARMY 7 Selectees (Enlisted Men) CARD NUMBER # # BOX NUMBER 1210 1210 FILM REEL NUMBER 4.120 4.120
  23. 1 point
    buk2112

    William "Bill" Brinkley (my grandfather)

    Warmest welcome to the forum Rmb2! We are certainly glad to have you here with us,I will try to help you out with a little information. According to Stanton's, the 125th Armored Engineer Battalion: Activated: 15 NOV 1942 at Camp Chaffee Arkansas Departed NYPE: 14 OCT 1944 Arrived ETO: 28 OCT 1944 August 1945 Location: Ampfling Germany Deactivated: 19 SEPT 1945 at Camp Myles Standish MASS Your grandfather's separation papers matches the ETO arrival date of 28 OCT 1944 for the 125th AEB, no guarantee, but most likely this was his unit. The 125th AEB was attached to the 14th Armored Division, which was also founded at Camp Chaffee. You do not mention what your grandfather's induction date into service was, it's possible that he was trained in the Thunderbird (45th) Division and then transferred to the 125th. Our gracious host Marion, may be able to shed more light on this, Good luck with your search. Randy
  24. 1 point
    Hello everyone. Looking for anything anyone might have in regard to the 3939th Quartermaster Gas Supply Company. My father was attached to that unit during his tenure overseas. He was wounded in action twice while lying in a hedgerow firing at a German farmhouse. The Germans were firing from the basement at ground level. He got the first purple heart when they caught him in the left shoulder, and the second when he turned to crawl back to the medics. This one entered his left heel and traveled up his calf to exit just below the knee. The medics risked their lives to get him and take him to a rear area and into another farmhouse and down the basement where they layed him on a table and tended to his wounds. One of the medics spied a row of canned goods lining the wall and asked, "Hey buddy, want a pickle?" My dad said that was the best pickle he ever tasted. Maybe it was because he knew he was headed HOME.
  25. 1 point
    Great story! (Well maybe not the massive injuries part of it!) Welcome to the forum. We welcome any other stories you might have. As for the unit, Marion, our indefatigable administrator, will no doubt have something for you shortly. Once again, welcome aboard!
  26. 1 point
    Thanks so much! Have a great week!
  27. 1 point
    A WWII veterans discharge document is the best source for learning the facts of his time in service. When starting your research on a WWII veteran, the discharge document is the first thing you should obtain. See "Locating & Obtaining a copy of a WWII Veterans Discharge Document" in another post in this thread section. One important point i must make concerns an old adage: ' Things May Not Be What They Seem' The unit shown in Box 6 is a common source of confusion for some people starting their research. The unit shown in Box 6 may NOT be the unit the veteran served in during his or her entire time of service, but may only be the LAST unit he/ she was assigned to and discharged from. For example, many men in the Army Air Corp who flew on bomber crews have an Army Air Forces Base unit ( xxx AAF Base Unit) listed in Box 6. Thousands of high point infantrymen in Europe whose divisions were being redployed to the Pacific or staying for Occupation Duty were transferred to other units to be shipped home and this 2nd unit will be the one shown in Box 6. This help document is a little lengthy so i put it in a .pdf Reading & Understanding the WWII Discharge Document.pdf
  28. 1 point
    CaptO

    Where's the outpouring when they pass?

    I think what you are seeing is the result of way Americans incorporate things into our consciousness - TV/Movies. I think that even if people still read as much "as they used to" (not a very quantifiable comment but you get the idea) seeing someone in some sort of motion picture really brings it home in people's minds. I will add at this point that since people are learning less and less about WWII, when they see some sliver of it on TV or in the movies that becomes their image of what WWII was. So now there are a lot of people to whom Saving Private Ryan, Band of Brothers, and The Pacific IS WWII. So now when one of those folks die (or even those just associated with the unit) it is like losing a movie star. If there were a movie about the 540th, which fought for 912 days I might add, perhaps there would be more of an outpouring from posters. As it is, those vets who die who were members of units that weren't the Rangers, Easy Co, and "the Marines" (i.e. infantry Marines who were on those Island campaigns) are not going to get the credit that the others get. And as you state, this is not to take away from those gentlemen!! It is only to lament that there are others who are deserving of the same recognition. Is it perhaps that Americans only have a certain amount of attention span and there are too many vets dying for people to be upset? Perhaps. That's just a feeling I have. We will leave the figuring out if that is right or not to the pollsters.
  29. 1 point
    I posted this on Facebook today after doing a lot of thinking, but I think it needed to be said. I may or may not receive from flak from it (oh pun), but I had to say what I felt in my heart. Here's the post... I don't mean any disrespect to the WWII COMMUNITY worldwide, but after looking at posts for the last several months, it is obvious that there is a clear distinction who gets paid tribute upon their passing and who doesn't, and I think that is clearly sad. I and others have posted the passing of WWII vets we've known and loved from various engineering units, etc., and if the post gets a couple of people to respond, we are lucky. Yet, I see a flood of people posting dozens upon dozens of replies each time a member of the airborne passes. As I stated, this is by no means an insult or slight to those men, but I think too many forget that each of these men played an important role during the war. Many of these men fought overseas for 2, 3 or more years during the war and I think it's a shame that they get glossed over. I just ask that you think about it and the sacrifices these soldiers made to the war effort. Appreciatively, MJC
  30. 1 point
    Thanks for the post. My grandfather's looks a little different. Component ORC is Officer Reserve Corps, yes? So sayeth Wikipedia. JCO Military record.pdf
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