Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Today
  2. Folks, Just found an interesting article on the University of Texas' "Portal to Texas History" website concerning Cpl J. D. Davenport, a member of Company A.
  3. Yesterday
  4. Thanks Gary, thanks Marion, most appreciate it! It's been a labor of love. We have 101 names for Company C, still working on H&S but will post when complete. 292nd Engineer Combat Battalion Company C Roster.xls Have a good one! Randy
  5. Last week
  6. Let's all give Randy, our hard working 292nd friend, a round of applause for all of his hard work. Thanks, Randy!!
  7. Good morning everybody! Today I'm posting the roster for Company A. Have collected 144 names for Company A, more than any of the four companies from the 292nd. Keep in mind though that all the rosters are still a work in progress. Take care, Randy 292nd Engineer Combat Battalion Company A Roster.xls
  8. buk2112

    American Legion turns 100

    The American Legion was founded in Paris France on March 15th, 1919. Friday marked the 100th anniversary of its founding, Happy 100th Birthday!!! And a big shout out to all current and past members! https://www.members.legion.org/IMAGES/mylegion/officerMaterial/Speeches/American Legion Birthday.pdf Have a good one everybody, Randy
  9. Marion, Thanks so much for your kind words. My grandmother was a wonderful person and I will live the rest of my life with her as a guide along with my father and grandfather. Your words concerning my grandmother were very kind and went straight to my heart. Talk to you soon, Gary
  10. Walt's Daughter

    2827th Company C

    You could literally spend months perusing all the documents, memoirs, and gallery photos on the 36th. Here's one of my fave photos from a past reunion. We had reenactors come out, and had a convoy through town. What a blast!
  11. steve boshko

    2827th Company C

    Marion, Thank you for that information -- it's a start. Love this website. I spent an hour just reading some of the action reports and looking at the photos. Regards, Steve
  12. Walt's Daughter

    2827th Company C

    He was a 36th Engineer. You can read all about them on the main site. He is a 6th Corps Engineer, which this site is dedicated to. Please see their page, and then you can also read all the individual memoirs on the site too. Redesignation In February 1945, the 36th Engineer Combat Regiment was reorganized as the 36th Engineer Combat Group. Thus the following occurred: 1st Bn became the 2826th Bn 2nd Bn became the 2827th Bn 3rd Bn became the 2828th Bn We had our last Seahorse reunion in 2017. Sorry you had to miss them. They were a blast. Looks like I have a lot to share with you.
  13. Earlier
  14. Walt's Daughter

    292nd Engineer Combat Battalion (New Member)

    That is wonderful news. I know everyone involved with the 292nd will be delighted to have this at their fingertips.
  15. Walt's Daughter

    Interesting Articles

    That is so sad. That's a lot of men, accounted for in WWII. Terrible for the families that are involved.
  16. Hello everyone. Today I would like to share the 292nd ECB Company B roster that I have been working on. I have updated it to include Sam Eggleston's grandfathers name but have not yet added the other names he has provided with the group photograph, will do this in time. Some notes about the rosters I have compiled, these names are men that have belonged to the unit at one point or another, does not imply that they spent their entire military service with unit. There are cases where some members were transferred to other companies within the 292nd, in such cases their names will appear on both rosters. The rank shown is what I have documentation for, their final rank at the end time of service certainly could be different from what is listed. I tried to be as accurate as possible, the information was gathered from multiple sources and I may have made errors in the final product, for any mistakes I apologize. If you spot errors or omissions please let me know, definitely want to get it right. Have a good one everybody! Randy 292nd Engineer Combat Battalion Company B Roster.xls
  17. buk2112

    Interesting Articles

    Remains of Army private killed in World War II identified By: The Associated Press   21 hours ago Army Pfc. William F. Delaney, 24, of Kingston, Tennessee, was killed during World War II. He was accounted for on Dec. 17, 2018, according to a release Monday, March 11, 2019, from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. KINGSTON, Tennessee — The remains of a World War II soldier from Tennessee who was killed in Germany have been identified, military officials say. Army Pfc. William F. Delaney of Kingston had been declared unrecoverable before dental and DNA analysis identified his remains, Defense Department officials said. Delaney,24, was fighting with the 4th Infantry Division when his battalion launched an artillery strike against German soldiers near Grosshau in the Hurtgen Forest on Nov. 22, 1944. An enemy artillery shell struck Delaney’s foxhole, and he died before he could be medically evacuated. His remains weren’t recovered then because of ongoing combat operations, according to a release from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. He was among hundreds of soldiers still missing from combat in the Hurtgen Forest when the war ended in 1945. In 1947, a local resident, Siegfried Glassen, found a set of remains that he thought were of an American soldier, and the remains were sent to the American Graves Registration Command. But the remains could not be identified and they were buried in Ardennes American Cemetery. Decades later, after an analysis of military records and AGRC documents, the remains were disinterred in 2017 and sent to DPAA for analysis. There the scientists used a range of evidence: dental, anthropological, material as well as mitochondrial DNA analysis. They discovered that the remains that had been designated years ago as “X-5425 Neuville” were those of Delaney. He was officially accounted for in December. The grave where he was interred as an “unknown” was “meticulously cared for over the past 70 years by the American Battle Monuments Commission,” the DPAA release said. Officials say more than 72,000 U.S. service members remain unaccounted for from World War II.
  18. Very sorry to hear of your loss, God bless. Randy
  19. Walt's Daughter

    292nd Engineer Combat Battalion (New Member)

    Dear Gary, sorry for your loss. That was very sweet of you to look after the care of your grandmother. God bless her for living such a long life. I hope that most of it was very happy. Good to have you back. Talk with you again shortly when things settle to a simmer. Smiles, M1
  20. Hello to all. My apologies for having been gone for way too long. Taking care of my elderly grandmother happily took up most of my time over a number of years and all of my time over the last year and a half. Alas, she passed away on Feb 13th at 103 and is now in a better place bringing smiles and good will to all she encounters there just as she did while here. Hopefully, we can revitalize this thread and continue to document the 292nd as we had started in the past. I will be on periodically and that should grow as things concerning my grandmother are taken care of. Thanks so much for your patience concerning my absence. Gary
  21. steve boshko

    2827th Company C

    Hello everyone. I'm just starting to find out about this picture of my father, Walter Boshko. He's in front of a sign. Can someone fill me in on the 2827th? I can tell you that my father was not an American, he was a Ukrainian, so I'm confused by this picture What was the role of non-Americans in the Engineering Unit?. Thank you. Steve
  22. Walt's Daughter

    253rd Engineer Combat Battalion

    Excellent post and nice synopsis. Glad you joined our forum and was able to shed a little more light regarding the unit. It's nice that your dad was able to fill in the censored parts of his letter, so all wouldn't be lost. I'm sure everyone reading this post is grateful for your participation.
  23. Dons Daughter

    253rd Engineer Combat Battalion

    I appreciate the leads others have given me about the 253rd Engineers Combat Battalion. It's helped me to put this history together. The following information is based on your assistance, public records, and letter my father Pvt. Don H. Lafler, service no. 42019810 sent home to his family from induction until discharge. Although specifics were not shared during censorship, he filled in some of the blanks after the surrender. The 253rd started out as a unit of the 1142nd Engineers Combat Group activated on October 15th, 1943 stationed at Camp Crowder, Missouri. The battalion participated in the Tennessee Maneuvers in early 1944 as part of the 1142 Combat Group and was then stationed at Camp Campbell, KY as part of the Group. When the 1142nd Combat Headquarters Company sailed for England August 29, 1944, the 253rd Engineers stayed behind. In October, the Battalion traveled by rail to Fort Miles Standish in Massachusetts, then sailed from Boston to England on the USS West Point, arriving there in early November. Company C of the 253rd Battalion was stationed at Camp Doddington in Cheshire near the railway centre at Crewe, England. On December 24, 1944 they were transported to the coast and shipped to France, arriving at the port of Cherbourg on December 29, 1944. From there the company moved to western France to support U.S. Army troops in the Ardennes. The company was located at Sarrequimines on January 11, 1945. By January 18, 1945 he wrote his family that he was living under better conditions and eating steak, port chops and chicken. In February 1945 they were located at Schirmeck attached to the 63rd Division running lumber mills, building bridges over the Saar River and clearing land mines. Don later lamented that he was deprived of points for discharge because their captain did not submit paperwork for participation in combat for which the 63rd Division was awarded a combat star. Don reported that he did accumulate several months of combat time. Don was assigned a jeep and later wrote that he put over 10,000 miles on his jeep driving dispatched and personnel over a five month period. In early March he made a trip to Nancy, France. On March 30, 1945 the company crossed the Rhine River and entered Germany. They accompanied the Seventh Army on its race toward the Austrian Alps. Again, the company ran a lumber mill and secured supplies for bridge building. On April 11, 1945 he reported that he had covered a lot of territory over the past few days and had passed through many towns were there wasn’t a complete building standing. Company C was stationed at Heidenheim throughout the summer and building bridges continued to be a high priority. On May 25, 1945 he drove to Berchtesgarden (location of Hitler’s Eagles Nest). Soldier were allowed to tour the site at that time. On May 31, 1945 the company was participating in recreation, playing softball. On August 16, 1945 he wrote that “we are operating lumber control points in railroad yards. The company is spread over 250 miles now.” On September 23, 1945 the company was broken up and he along with 35 others were attached to the Seventh Army 970 Engineers Maintenance Company stationed in Heidenheim and later outside Schwetzinger, ten miles from Manheim. On October 29, 1945 he wrote his family that “when I was in the 253rd Engineers we weren’t attached to any division. We were Army engineers and worked under Army jurisdiction completely, only working with Divisions on certain things.” On November 18, 1945 he wrote that “we have changed to TSF (theater service forces) but are still under Seventh Army supervision” whose headquarters were in Heidelberg. I also have photos of some of the soldiers in Company C and will be happy to share them. I am including a list of soldiers identified below: At Camp Crowder, MO (basic training) George Collins Al Marano Bob Morris Lee Salazzo Steve Saraffin At Gallitan, TN (April 1944) Ameil Maattis (Yonkers NY) Al Marano Dick Passino (Gloversville NY) Christ Vellucci (Brooklyn NY) At Camp Campbell, Kentucky (July 1944) Harold Mattison (Jamestown, NY) Joe Priester (Buffalo, NY) Al Smith (Lockport, NY) Eddy Smith (Lockport, NY) In Heidenheim, Germany ( Summer-Winter1945) now serving with 970 Engineer Maintenance Motor Pool 21 Wild Strasse (former Panzer barracks) Peter Bleigh (Syracuse NY) Herb Hoak Dan Jipson Merril Kirkey Jack Minges
  24. colinhotham

    343rd Engineer General Service Regiment

    It is obvious that a person or persons are looking after that memorial, now I want to understand more! Colin.
  25. Every now and then, especially if I wake early, I enjoy a journey through the latest posts on Marion's website. I was attracted to this post by the great photos and agree with both Todd and Marion that the photos here are an awesome collection. I particularly like the framed medals and badges, which I suppose is one man's WW2 history. Also in the photo of the truck, the young boy in light coloured shorts and shirt with his hands clasped behind his back would be around the same age as me if it was taken in 1942! The first and fourth photo remind me of the English seaside town and port of Margate near where I was born on the south east UK coast. Colin.
  26. Walt's Daughter

    Sgt Joseph Szvetitz 20th enginers , 1340th company C

    You are very welcome. Love having new peeps on board.
  27. Joe Szvetitz

    Sgt Joseph Szvetitz 20th enginers , 1340th company C

    Awesome to have a forum like this , yes I look forward to discussing this. Appreciate all your efforts,
  28. Walt's Daughter

    Sgt Joseph Szvetitz 20th enginers , 1340th company C

    First off, a warm welcome. Thanks for joining my forum. Oh boy, the CIB! Sorry to say, but that opens up an entire can of worms. If you can get through it, please read the info discussed regarding that topic, here on my forum. It's very involved and convoluted, to say the least. It's been one of my pet peeves since I began conducting research on my dad's unit, over a dozen years ago. I look forward to talking with you regarding his unit and the CIB
  1. Load more activity
×