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  1. Yesterday
  2. Theron, This is immensely helpful. I have reached out to the archives for unit records and will be follow up with some of the other methods suggested. In regards to the hierarchy, I have a few clarifying questions... Would an engineer combat group serve as part of the same corp for the duration of the war? Or would they shift? As a member of the engineer combat group, rather than one of the smaller groups making it up, how would your actual job differ? I'm assuming it would be more logistics and planning oriented? I was previously able to find 3 engineer battalions that served under the 1173rd. They were the 20th, 1340th & 146th combat engineers. In November of 1944 they were committed as Infantry and tasked with operations in the Hürtgen Forest. It seems as though that at the very least would be providing reason for Rhineland campaign accreditation. It seems like finding unit records specific to the 1173rd would be a step in the right direction for learning more. I am also including another record of service document we found.
  3. Last week
  4. Hi.. 1. While Your GGF's records may have been destroyed in the St. Louis fire, the UNIT records are located in College Park, MD. I suggest you contact the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) via the internet and ask for unit records that match the dates on his discharge...arrival in the TO and departure from the ETO. the records usually include S-3 journals (message and incident logs), After Action Reports (monthly summaries) and other things. 2. I suggest you also try the VA. Their records are sometimes distinct from the Military's. The files focus on health related issues: and every time a solder transferred units, he got a physical and a dental check up. Using that information, you can trace your GGF from unit to unit. sometimes the discharge record lists the most recent unit the soldier was in, not necessarily the one in which he spent most of his time. So, the VA records noted above might shed some light. 3. According to the discharge and to the Campaign & Citation Register, he earned credit for Northern France and the Rhineland Campaigns. The Discharge also notes he entered service via the National Guard. So, he served in more than one unit before getting to the 1173rd. I suggest you contact the State (where he was living at the time) National Guard HQ and see what they can tell you, if anything. 4. If you not already done so, I suggest you check out the US Army's WWII history series, "the Green books." There are two volumes covering the Engineers listed in the "Technical series" sub-set and a number of campaign volumes in the ETO sub-series covering the actions of the Third Army. The volume "The Last Offensive" by Chas. MacDonald lists the VIII Corps in the index. I THINK these books are all on-line with free access. 5 Finally, if you haven't tried it, I suggest you look at the options Ancestry.com offers. You can check veterans records for free, if I am not mistaken. Remember that any Engineer Combat Group was an umbrella headquarters that controlled a group of Engineer smaller units, Company and Battalion sized. Engineer Groups were usually controlled by the Corps Engineer...and could be used near the Front or behind it, supporting combat operations. These Groups managed the smaller units necessary, like truck companies, engineer (C) Battalions, bridging companies etc...and were then attached to whatever Divisions in the Corps that needed these units. Oftentimes, Combat Battalions maintained roads, cleared minefields etc, built bridges or defensive positions too.
  5. Hello all, My name is Brendan and I am the great grandson of Wilbur B. McAllister, a combat engineer who served in WW2. Having heard stories of his service from my childhood I have always been interested in knowing more. Unfortunately, I never had the chance to meet my grandfather and what I quickly learned from family is that he never spoke a word about his service and would typically leave the room if such conversation came up. This left a large blank space as to his experience in WW2. My goal from the start has been to uncover more about his service, primarily to share with my grandfather so he can finally know what his dad did in the war. Before I was born, my great grandfathers uniforms were donated to a local historical society. As the story always went, the uniforms and 'a medal with a star' were donated. Unfortunately after several months of display outside of a case, with easy public access, the 'medal with a star' was stolen. As years passed and the historical society moved, all hope seemingly was lost that the uniforms had been preserved. After months talking with the historical society... 3 uniforms from my great grandfather have been found and they have been the source of more questions than answers. As for information, I am attaching a few pieces to start with. Some of the uniform and some of paperwork found in storage. I have not been able to reclaim the uniforms at this time, so I am working solely with photos they provided. A brief overview of information I have so far is.. He served in Europe with the 1173 Engineer Combat Group as an officer. 3 uniforms have been located. One early jacket (field jacket?) displays a First Army patch and a VIII (8 Corp) patch. Hash marks are present on sleeve. No other pins, patches, etc. One dress jacket displays engineer collar pins, 3rd army patch, hash marks on sleeve, ribbon rack of WWII Victory Medal, American Campaign Medal, European-african-middle eastern campaign medal with 4 bronze campaign service stars, American Defense Service Medal & Silver Star. One tan dress uniform. Displays First Army Patch on one shoulder and 3rd Army Patch on the other. Hash marks and ribbon rack representing all medals listed previously. I had been told this uniform is what he wore while heavily involved in retired officer activity. Military Certificate of Service from 1946 only lists 2 campaigns and doesn't mention the silver star. What I am currently trying to determine is what campaigns did he take part in and what are the circumstances of the silver star. I sent out a request for records last year, only to hear the ever so common 'the records were destroyed in the fire'. I sent a separate request recently requesting history of medals. Any information would be EXTREMELY helpful. All my research of engineers has been a huge learning experience and I know there are many differences that come with researching their service. Thank you all!
  6. Good afternoon all! My name is Brendan and I am the great grandson of a WW2 combat engineer. For the past many months I have been digging into researching my great grandfathers service in the war. Between the documents held on to by my grandparents and online research, I have learned many new things but many new questions have arose after locating uniforms that had been presumed to be lost by a local historical society. I will be posting up specifics to the 'Looking For' section and look forward to tapping the knowledge of the members! Best
  7. Walt's Daughter

    Dwl

    These are so obscure, you'd have to have one made, unless you can find one on Ebay, etc. (which is a shot in the dark). I'd contact places such as: https://www.militaryvetspx.com/ https://www.armysurplusworld.com/military-rank-patches https://www.ebay.com/bhp/military-insignia Best of luck. Keep us informed.
  8. dwl

    Dwl

    Hello Marion, Thank you again for your help! Was wondering, do you know of a place where I could order this insignia? I have tried Dover Army-Navy Store and they do not have it. Sincerely, Dwl
  9. Earlier
  10. Walt's Daughter

    Dwl

    Wonderful! Wonderful! I feel that we are all one big, happy family here and it's our job to reunite and explore! This is especially true since the numbers are thinning exponentially. I'm delighted that we could help you, and in turn you are helping others.
  11. dwl

    Dwl

    THANK YOU Marion!!! I would never have found this information (and I've been looking a long time!) So very much appreciated! My husband just found this old photo of his dad's (Rudy) company. I have also viewed the photo from Mr. David Baker - it is of the 363D but the one I have is different. My father-in-law is not seen in Mr. Baker's photo. There is no identifying information on the photo. We have found Rudy - he is front row seated, 7th from the left.
  12. Walt's Daughter

    Dwl

    I went through my DUI booklet this morning and do show the elephant insignia for the 363rd Engineer Regiment GS (general Service).According to the book, the insignia was authorized 19 Feb of '36 and approved 27 May of '36.
  13. Walt's Daughter

    New to the Group!

    Thanks Randy. I have been out of sorts with a severe case of bronchitis and haven't been on the forum much at all. Good to be back. Welcome Deborah. Glad to make your acquaintance and look forward to any discussion/questions that you may have.
  14. buk2112

    New to the Group!

    Hello Deborah, glad you have joined us here on the forum. Certainly look forward to anything you have to share with us regarding your father and the 245th ECB. If you type in "245th" in the forum search box, located on the top right of the page, it will show you previous posts about this unit. There is a website devoted to the 245th ECB, here is the link for it: http://hillabee.net/245eng.htm Lots of great info and pics there. Good luck with your search Deborah! Randy
  15. dwl

    Dwl

    Oh - how funny! A seahorse! Well, I guess an elephant isn't that far-fetched! Hope soon will be able to confirm/deny this patch. Thank you!
  16. Deborah Gregory

    New to the Group!

    Hello. My name is Deborah Gregory and my father was Will T Colter. He served in the 245th Combat Engineers Company A. I would like to find any info or pics of the 245th and share anything I have as well. My father rarely ever spoke of his service even when we asked him! 1willtwwii.bmp
  17. John is in hospice care right now. This is the latest news from his son.
  18. Walt's Daughter

    John J. Kudla

    That is absolutely wonderful news. Thank you for sharing your happiness.
  19. henkgerrits

    John J. Kudla

    Hi Marion and Theron, I just want to let you know that I, as of 10.01.2018, am in contact with a niece of John J. Kudla. We allready send each other messages and she has send me all kinds of information and photo's of John and his family! So my search of months was succesful. Next year we will put a photo of John in front of his grave. So everybody can see not only a grave (one of many) but also the person who gave his life for our freedom! Thank you for your kindness! Greetings from Eindhoven, the Netherlands, Henk Gerrits
  20. angatti

    169th Engineer Combat Battalion

    Thanks to the contribution coming from Roger L. Knight, a 1LT with the 169th Engineer Battalion (Construction) in Vietnam and Sean Michael Griffing, grandson of John Francis Griffing member of the 337th Engineer General Service Regiment and then of the 169th Engineer Combat Battalion I was able to add something new, New map, new photos, on the webpage dedicated to the 337th Engineer General Service Regiment. In the meantime we have redesigned our website also, as you can see, it is a work in progress.
  21. Yes, I knew this news would be coming, but it still hurts to hear. I'm glad I got to meet him - he was a great man (as all of them I met were).
  22. Walt's Daughter

    36th Ike Jacket

    Thank you for your input. It's never too late to add to a post!
  23. Over the last ten years John became an important person in my life as via this website and then attending the reunions I got to know and admire this special member of the greatest generation. With Marion's help I attended six reunions and met so many wonderful people and it was John's welcome from the start that made me want to return each year. We all owe him so much and I can only say "thank you" to him and wish him well. Colin.
  24. brian m

    36th Ike Jacket

    I am a little late to this conversation but figured I would add a few insights. When the men were being shipped back home, they did not always come back as a group. Men with enough points would be sent home first and the fewer points you had, the longer you had to stay. When they units were split up the individuals were moved to other outfits that were being readied to be shipped back to the states. When that soldier came into the new outfit, they would need to wear that outfits insignia on their left shoulder. As stated above, they were permitted to wear their previous outfits insignia on their right shoulder. So, for any given soldier, the outfit he came home in could have absolutely nothing to do with his service overseas. One of my guys was in an engineer outfit that had been attached to the First Army, Third Army, and Seventh Army. When he was sent home he ended up with the 26th Infantry Division (the Yankee Division) and wore their insignia on his left arm. Even though he protested, he was still given and ordered to wear the Fourragère the 26th had earned as a unit during the war. They said that he was part of their division now and everyone must wear it. Also, if the soldier was in more than one outfit previously, he could choose which insignia he wore on his right arm. For my friend mentioned above, the patch he wore on his right arm was that of the Seventh Army, the one he was with most recently (and probably the only one he had on him at the time). For one of my family members, he chose the patch that he liked most from his past units. That happened to be the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF) patch. His reasoning was that he liked the looks of it and it was the one that Eisenhower wore.
  25. Dear 36th'ers: Got the dreaded notification the other day. It's the one you know is coming, but never quite prepared for, nonetheless. It is with heavy heart that I tell you that Captain John Fallon is in critical condition in the hospital and not expected to pull through. I spoke with his son, John Jr, the other night and he kindly asked if I would inform everyone on my list. Certainly. So many things that I would like to write, but know this, John was my first introduction to the 36th Engineers of WWII. At that point, I wasn't sure if my father was with the 36th or 540th, and John helped me sort through a lot of confusing data. Even though we discovered that my dad was in the 540th (the sister battalion to the 36th), he insisted that I come out to a reunion, and well, the rest is history. I wound up not only meeting a ton of wonderful people, but became the official historian of this unit. Lucky girl - I got adopted. To me, attending the reunions every year, was even better than Christmas in my book. Everyone became my extended family and it brought me even closer to my dad (he passed when I was twelve). I so looked forward to every fall, and seeing the gang once again. It was such a joy and real learning experience. I've never met a nicer group of men and women. As many of you know, we've lost the majority of men in the last few years, and John is the last. So difficult to write these words. Breaks my heart and I'm sure that everyone who had the pleasure of meeting John, will feel the same way. I could go on and on, but suffice to say that John holds a special place in my heart, and always will. (photo attached was taken by yours truly in 2006 - my first reunion) Stay rugged, Marion
  26. Walt's Daughter

    1346 Combat Engineers

    Oh how cool is this. Thank you for joining and posting this image. I hope someone spots it and is able to give us more information about the gentleman.
  27. Reginaldo

    1346 Combat Engineers

    I know this thread is pretty old, but it is related to a photo that I found. I have the original negative, and all the information I have about this photo is: "1945: 1346th Combat Engineers, Lieutenant". If somebody has any information or knows any history about this image, please let me know. I would love to learn more about this tiny piece of the history! Best regards, Reginaldo.
  28. Walt's Daughter

    540th archived records for you?

    Hello everyone: Years ago when I paid a private researcher to obtain copies of the archived records for the 540th, I also wound up with a couple hundred duplicate copies which are laying around the house. So... if anyone is interested, I would be happy to mail these to you under one condition - you pay for the postage. These are various records that you would have to recompile (sort), but I'm most happy to share. Please let me know. First come, first serve.
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