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  1. Yesterday
  2. Michael McBride

    160th Engineer Combat Battalion WW II ( new member)

    Yes, it is Todd. My typo.
  3. glen blasingim

    160th Engineer Combat Battalion WW II ( new member)

    Michael, I have a question about no 71. Your list calls him Pfc Tood. I do not show a Tood on B company roster but I do show two Todds. Would you check and see if it could possibly be Todd? Glen Blasingim
  4. Last week
  5. Earlier
  6. Michael McBride

    160th Engineer Combat Battalion WW II ( new member)

    Thanks, I do believe that the James Corley identified as #83 is the one in the picture you referenced. I have heard back from National Archives a couple of weeks ago and unfortunately they said his records were lost in the fire they had some years ago. It seems at some point he was transferred to Co K 104th Infantry Regiment that is listed on his burial record and a shoulder patch of the Yankee Division is part of the Military keepsakes we have. I'm afraid this is all I will ever know as so much time has passed. Thanks again and be sure to let me know of any new developments. Michael
  7. glen blasingim

    160th Engineer Combat Battalion WW II ( new member)

    Michael, I have not heard from James Corley's son. I am going to start adding the names of the engineers that your Dad has identified. I have searched through them and cannot find any reason why they would not be accurate. I appreciate that these identifications were made by your Dad while he was around these guys on a daily basis. Thanks so much for the contribution and the interest. Stay in touch. Anything that I learn and can add, I will. If any of your relatives or friends remember anything your Dad might have told them we are interested so please share it with us. Glen Blasingim
  8. Walt's Daughter

    John J. Kudla

    You are so welcome. So glad that my forum could be of help to you. Tons of smiles!
  9. Walt's Daughter

    351st Engineers, Company E, 2nd Battalion

    These are two of the topics regarding the 531st on our forum. They span a period over several years. Hope these help. Looking forward to talking with you. Mare
  10. Walt's Daughter

    George Jackson, 326th Airborne Engineering Battalion

    Makes me really appreciate that I could make it to two of their reunions in Michigan. Sure miss those days.
  11. henkgerrits

    John J. Kudla

    Hi Marion, On june 7th 2019 we visited the grave of John J. Kudla again to leave a picture of him at his grave. We paid our respects and left an American flag and flowers too. As promised. He is not forgotten. I will visit Normandy again next year. Let me know if I can do something for you. Do you want a picture(s) of a special grave, building, town, beach, monument........ I will try to do it for you. Thanks again for your kindness to make the effort helping me. Greetings from Eindhoven, The Netherlands Henk Gerrits
  12. It truly is amazing how he's become quite the celebrity. Shortly after this round-table, the local news interviewed him for a short piece on the 6pm news. https://wnep.com/2019/09/24/75-years-later-wwii-vet-tells-his-story/
  13. My Dad was Adolphus [Dick] Passino and was in the 351st Engineers, Company E, 2nd Battalion as a carpenter. Does anyone have any detailed information on their missions or pictures they would like to share? Karen
  14. Walt's Daughter

    George Jackson, 326th Airborne Engineering Battalion

    This is wonderful. I'm sure he felt right at home. How nice to have a warm welcome. Makes me happy that this took place. Keep it going!
  15. It's been yet a year since I posted, so I wanted to provide another update on George. He's been quite the celebrity, travelling and giving interviews. He met a group called the Central Pennsylvania WWI Roundtable in Hummelstown PA when he attended the Reading, PA WWII weekend this summer. They asked him to come speak, last night, to a crowd of about 100 people. He recounted many of the stories he shared in my interview with him on YouTube. At the end, he stuck around and shook hands, and signed autographs. And made the front page of the paper in preparation for this event. Props to the folks who helped get George to the event, about 1.5 hours away from his home. What an amazing group of people, enthusiastic about learning the history from our veterans, in person. I made the 2 hour drive to attend and here are a few photos I took at the event.
  16. Calm, don't worry, we keep looking ...
  17. Sorry. This is a tough assignment...
  18. I've seen it all (I know it very well), there are no German SP guns
  19. https://history.army.mil/books/wwii/winterline/winter-fm.htm https://history.army.mil/brochures/naples/72-17.htm https://www.jstor.org/stable/43470099?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USA/USA-MTO-Salerno/index.html http://www.6thcorpscombatengineers.com/docs/1108th/We%20the%2048th%20book.PDF I hope some of this helps. It's a lot of reading.
  20. I haven't watched this all the way through, but... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1abpPHb1Hc
  21. While I don't believe this section points to any specific sp guns, it does give the history of the 1108th (48th and 235th Bns) during winter 43/44 in Italy.
  22. Unfortunately not many left here. Too many of my boys have left this earth.
  23. Let's hope some veterans have some memories.
  24. Sorry, not at this time, at least for me. Don't give up.
  25. Hello everyone, any information?
  26. That's amazing. There's a difference between the WWII experience and the wars fought after. With long wars such as Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq - and also short ones like Desert Storm - you don't get the life long camaraderie as you got with the WWII generation. I think there a few reasons why. First it was a different generation. The US was just starting become a powerhouse of a nation. People say WWII made us one, but we had to have had the right mix of people, resources and attitude to have WWI propel us to that lofty station. Back to the point, prior to the mid-40s people generally didn't move very far from there home town. Trying - and failing - to leave home was a theme of "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946). I think that led people to be inclined to make deeper and more lasting friendships. Now you take those same people and put them in a unit that is told it's in the fight overseas "for the duration". Sometimes, as in the case of the folks who landed in North Africa, that was close to (if not over) three years. Add to that the life and death factor and you have the groundwork for remarkably long lasting friendships. In Vietnam, it was the individual that rotated in for a year and then left while the unit stayed in place. This seems to have not been very successful and those lessons learned lead to the whole unit swap model used since then. For my generation, we were formed into units that would train together for six months to a year, deploy for six months to a year and then dis-aggregate upon return to the States. Some leaving the service others to different units, but the unit changed dramatically following it's return. In both cases, however, you don't have that years long shared experience the WWII folks had. For me personally (as with most modern Marines), the long term friendships are based on knowing people in the Marine Corps. I keep in touch with some of the folks I served with, but distance has its tyrannies. The person I was friends with for the longest time was someone I met in Okinawa. I knew him for 3 years there and another two once we both moved (coincidentally) to Quantico at the same time. He lives in Wisconsin though, and that is a pretty long haul from the DFW area. Add to that the fact that there are no unit reunions to bring folks together. It's hard to get folks together for a reunion when they were only in country for eight months. Or how about the guy who deployed to combat zones for maybe five or six times? I went twice (nine and five months in 2004 and 2009, respectively) myself, but don't regularly talk to any of the folks I deployed with. To wrap this missive around to the beginning, I find it a wonderful thing that those guys had such deep and lasting friendships. Such things are a rarity and to think about how many came out of that generation truly speaks to the special time they lived in and the amazing men they were.
  27. Michael McBride

    160th Engineer Combat Battalion WW II ( new member)

    I wondered when I was typing list if some of the names might be nicknames as happens a lot in military. I did not try to check anything as I did the list, just copied as written. Thanks for all you do for this group of Veterans. As I have spent some time checking the pics I see that my Dad also identified #83 as Pvt Corley and I could not rule out that is James Corley.
  28. glen blasingim

    160th Engineer Combat Battalion WW II ( new member)

    Michael, this is great. The names you have fit mine when they are identified by both of us. We have one disagreement, that is you call number 96 Pfc Corley and Dad called him Pfc Korol. I remember that Dad even spelled his name correctly. I sent an e-mail to James Corley"s son and asked him if he could identify his Dad as engineer number 96, and James Young as number 121 ( his Dad and James Young lived close to each other and were acquainted after the war). I would think that the other names are correct and we should probably add them to the identified list. Still digesting. There is a picture of James N. Corley in our post dated Dec. 13, 2015. See if you can find a match. I will let you know as soon as I hear from his son. Glen Blasingim
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