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  2. You'll love this pic I just saw on FB. Reminded of this post.
  3. Walt's Daughter

    527th Engineer Light Pontoon CO

    Thanks for posting that wonderful info. I will have to take more time to go through it all.
  4. My dad's unit worked in the Naples Harbor. Huge undertaking.
  5. Mark Pendergast

    527th Engineer Light Pontoon CO

    I've attached a couple of accounts from the Battle of the Bulge and Rhine Crossing that I found online. I also attached my father's account of the war that he wrote in 1998 for his grandsons. Mark Pendergast Son of O.W. "Bud" Pendergast. 3rdArmyRhineCrossing.pdf George Kester - Give me the Jeep!.pdf My Father was at Rosieres.pdf 527LPC_as_told_by_Bud_Pendergast.pdf
  6. Attached are some of the photos my late father, O.W. "Bud" Pendergast took. I don't know any of the names or locations, but they give a sense of what life was like in the company. After the war ended he transferred to a harbor craft company, so some of these pictures might be from then. Mark Pendergast
  7. Thanks for the quick reply. I've come across a lot of the same things you mentioned already. I might have no choice but to make an extended visit to NARA...there's a section on PBS in the Engineering records there which may have some of the answers I seek. I actually got a copy of the Photographic History of the Peninsular Base Section used on Amazon. Quite neat pictures, including Engineers turning capsized ships in Naples Harbor (apparently scorched Earth tactics by the retreating Germans) into piers! The book has a brief mention of the raid, but nothing else too useful. Lowell
  8. Sounds great. Keep me updated and Merry Christmas. Good luck!
  9. That would definitely be helpful to have. Right now I am waiting on a medals and citations request with the national archives. I am told I should have a verdict by January 1st on whether or not they located appropriate documentation. Once there is a verdict on that, I likely will go the morning report route to learn more.
  10. Walt's Daughter

    First Sargent Angelo Maggi

    I would start with NARA in St Louis, but don't get your hopes up because of the fire of '73. However, that is not to say you wouldn't be successful. Actually without me retyping everything, I have an extensive Research topic that I encourage every new member to read when they first begin. It gives you detailed instructions on how to proceed.
  11. Enjoyed reading your the page (linked above). Great research. A lot of time and effort went into it and it's very well done. Quickly (more later because I'm in the middle of doing "Christmas stuff"), I am adding documents/links that may shed more light on the subject matter. List of the various types of WWII engineer units and their functions. Naples/Foggia Campaign 5th Army History - Also list which engineer units fought and where http://www.6thcorpscombatengineers.com/docs/5th Army/5th Army History - part one - Activation to Fall of Naples.pdf https://www.fold3.com/image/291745053 Photographic history of the Peninsular Base Section, United States Army : an illustrated history of Peninsular Base Section functions in Italy from 1 January to 1 May 1944 Records of Mediterranean - NARA Engineers in the PBS You may want to perform a search on the main site (search engine on Home Page), to see what else may be of interest to you As far as the truck show in the photo you mentioned, it's my take that they were using whatever means available to them at the time. Not uncommon at all. So I don't find that, that unusual. Heck, they used whatever means necessary to get the job done. It's called being enterprising. As you also stated, they were spread thin. It all makes sense. Not sure if you have seen this yet, nor how helpful it may be. Seems to be an overview. Peninsular Base Section, Italy - at Amazon Hopefully I have not duplicated anything for you, but it may help others who are performing similar research. Of course, this is just the tip of the iceberg, but it's a start... Merry Christmas,
  12. A little poem by moi. Wishing everyone here a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! Thank you for being a member of my forum and enriching this site for others. Marion aka M1
  13. theron

    First Sargent Angelo Maggi

    Have you tried NARA.gov or even Ancestry.com and the free military service records? You could at least get a unit...which would enable you to really start to explore Another source would be Newspapers.com, searching on the name to find out if there are articles either about is enlistment or his return home. I know that my Dad was named in a local paper when he sent his Purple-Heart to his mother.
  14. Don maggi

    First Sargent Angelo Maggi

    Hello everyone I am trying to find any info on my late father, Angelo " Lou " Maggi. I have very little info to go by. I know that he was a first Sargent from a memory of his old uniform patch. I do know from his deceased sister that he was in a combat engine unit in Italy at the end of Ww2. He was on a unit that built bridges over rivers. He was born April 27 1910. At the time he entered the army he was living in Paterson N.J. Well that is all I know. If any knows of any unit rosters that might help, please let me know thanks Don Maggi
  15. My grandfather, Robert Silverman was a dentist in the 32nd Station Hospital in the MTO. The one story he told his sons was about a close call he had when dud bombs fell on the hospital during a German air raid. While researching the story, I discovered the raid happened on April 24, 1944 at the compound in Caserta, Italy. At that time, the 32nd was assigned to the Peninsular Base Section. I was able to find photographs from the incident at the Pritzker Military Museum. When I showed the photos to a retired U.S. Army E.O.D. expert who also is a historian for bomb disposal units in WWII, he pointed out some oddities in procedure and unit markings. The disposal unit's 2 1/2 ton truck doesn't have any bomb disposal markings, for instance. In fact, the only markings on the bumperettes are "PBS" on the left and what looks like "20" or "23" on the right. A couple of people suggested that it's possible that an Engineers unit might have done the disposal in this case. There were only two Ordnance bomb disposal companies and a few independent squads in all of Italy at the time and it seems that when they were spread thin, Engineers might have been called on. I was hoping to find out which Engineer units might have been assigned to the Peninsular Base Section in the Caserta or Naples area in April 1944, or at least what sort of Engineer unit would have been called upon to perform this duty if a BD squad was not available. With that information I was hoping to have a productive visit (when I can squeeze in time off toddler duty) to the National Archives to see if I can find confirmation. My research so far, including the photographs, can be viewed here: https://32ndstationhospital.wordpress.com/2018/12/04/the-32nd-station-hospitals-close-call-during-a-german-air-raid/ Thanks.
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  17. Walt's Daughter

    Need help piecing my Grandpa's WWII story - 39th Combat Engr

    Morning reports come from St Louis.
  18. Walt's Daughter

    Twilight for Pearl Harbor Survivors

    With five USS Arizona crew members remaining, it’s ‘twilight’ for Pearl Harbor survivors
  19. I'll take a look at the history section. I missed that and went straight to the forums.
  20. The link I referred to in my post was a link to a dropbox location. The researcher indicated these were the morning reports. Snapshot attached. I'm not sure which NARA facility he obtained these records from. I do have a quote from a researcher from the Maryland location.
  21. Walt's Daughter

    Need help piecing my Grandpa's WWII story - 39th Combat Engr

    Just to clarify and I hope this helps. Unit reports are gathered at NARA in Maryland. Morning reports are garnered at NARA in St Louis. So I take it your researcher has tried both places? You say your researcher gave you a link? A link to where? Records at NARA have to be copied with a scanner. A researcher has to schedule a date and time at the archives ahead of time, then NARA pulls the appropriate record boxes, then he would scan the info and give you copies. I am confused. Did he actually go to NARA or simply look up info online. Please elaborate. Morning reports are just that, roll call, etc. Unit reports are of four different varieties - daily, weekly and monthly. And they also included after-action reports if the unit was involved in any fighting. Going back and re-reading what you initially wrote, he couldn't have been involved in the North Africa invasion (due to his arrival date), but the men of the 39th did train in North Africa for the invasion of Sicily which took place in July of 1943. Many units, including my father's trained there for this invasion. So that would jive. You aren't going to find much of anything under demolition specialist, just descriptions of what one is and what they do. To garner more info, read the histories I provide on the 39th's page on the main site and the memoirs of the men in the section I talked about a few days ago.
  22. My researcher got back with me: There are actually three Reports included in the link: images 1-30 are the ‘Battalion-level’ reports. Since we don’t know your grandfather’s Company in the 39th, I decided to exceed our scope of work and located the reports for the two constituent Companies of the 39 Engineers, which were Companies E and F. Pages 31-63 are for Company E of the Battalion; and pages 64-95 are for Company F. I looked through the reports, but I'm not sure if they are morning reports. One page gives a general idea of what they were doing (training, building a staging area, recreation) and opposite page frequently has names and some notation which I can't understand. I only reports for Sept 1943, which is when the invasion of Salerno happened. My grandpa was a part of that invasion force. His separation papers indicate he is a demolitions specialist. Based on the morning reports and other things I've read on the 39th, I'm beginning to wonder if my grandpa served in a different until and only joined the 643rd for the boat ride home. Any suggestions of where I should look next? I'm going to start Google-ing demolition specialist, but not optimistic I'll find any but an FBI agent at my door asking about my web searches.
  23. I hired a great guy who was very reasonable. Just got my morning reports within the last year. They were helpful and exciting for me. My dad passed when I was twelve, so every little tidbit is a blessing. I can give you the researcher's name if you wish.
  24. Unfortunately no success with the town clerks office or state Veterans office. Through just a bit of research, that seems like a fantastic resource. Accessing these reports can only be done in person or by a hired researcher, is that correct? Some of the researchers offerings seemed very enticing for gathering these reports as well as any unit rosters, etc to try and piece together my great grandfathers day-to-day, month-to-month.
  25. Just for personnel records, you can also check with his county. All returning soldiers were supposed to file a copy of their discharge records with the county in which they resided. Also the local (state) Veteran's Admin would have a copy of his records on file. That is how I retrieved my father's DD's.
  26. The best way to find out is through morning reports.
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