What memories do you have about a Combat Medic?
#11

:D:D:D

 

Joe:-

 

My patient is in bed watching TV so I have a few minutes to be on here. Whoopee!!

In fact the laundry is even done and the dishes washed!!!

 

You are a real piece of work.

 

Thus far you have been offering me sympathy for my troubles and now I find we are basically in the same boat, with our family matters, and the GD boat is leaking.

 

I'll give you the same good advice you gave me "Hang In There"!!!

 

Will add you and your to my prayers tonight.

 

Sgtleo :heartpump::heartpump::heartpump:

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#12

I did not mean that posting to be caustic at all.  I feel it was taken the wrong way.  However if my posts offend anyone let me know and will cease them.  And yes, I too

have gone through a bad time.  My wife had foot surgery, son came back from the hospital last weekafter a bad heart attack and I have to help him also,, one hell of a bad snow/ice storm here and found out I am allergic  (bad reaction) to medication for bum shoulder rotor cup.

HANG IN THERE JOE; I AM WITH YOU, YES THERE WERE MEDICS ON YOUR SIDE OF EUROPE AND WE HAD OURS ALSO. THEY SHOULD HAVE GOTTEN THE C.I.B.WITH OAKLEAF CLUSTERS. ALL THEY CARRIED WAS A MUSETTE BAG WITH SULFA POWDER, BANDAGES. ETC.ETC. AND THEIR FIELD PACK. OF COURSE YOU COULD SPOT THAT RED CROSS ON THEIR HELMET. HOW'S THE WIFE DOING AFTER HER OPERATION?? HOW ABOUT YOU JOE, TAKE CARE, KEEP THAT ATV HOT. KETCH ME LATER. ROQUE P.S. COMBAT MEDIC !!! HOW ABOUT CARRYING A LITTER DOWN A MOUNTAIN TRAIL, PEOPLE SHOULD READ ABOUT THE NORTH APPENINES.

 

Joe, Iwrote you before this post but I HIT THE REPORT INSTEAD OF QUOTE, I THINK I AM GOING TO QUIT WRITING, like you Joe, getting old.

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#13

HOW ABOUT CARRYING A LITTER DOWN A MOUNTAIN TRAIL, PEOPLE SHOULD READ ABOUT THE NORTH APPENINES.

 

Now that you mention Italy, you should read this book:

"Long Walk Through War" by Klaus H. Huebner. Sub-title: A Combat Doctor's Diary.

Captain Huebner was assigned as Battalion Surgeon for 3rd Battalion, 349th Infantry Regiment, 88th "Blue Devils" Infantry Division. Even though his title was a doctor, his job was to patch up the wounded and relay them back to a Field Hospital where they would actually be treated. He was of German descent and spoke German. His book follows the soldiers as they move through Italy where he would set up his medical aid station at any available farm house, cave, clump of trees or whatever was available.

His book provides a good look at the job of the medic and what the fighting was like in Italy.

 

Quotes from Captain Klaus Huebner, medical officer with 351st Regiment,

"Bracing my hands to get up, I almost set off a mine buried directly in front of me. In my stupidity and gripped with panic, I have jumped into a mine field! I must get back on the highway. I muster all the strength I have left and, sidestepping dangerously exposed mines like a football player does would-be tacklers, leap back onto the road. … The irony of it all is that while I was gone, my guide arrived. The poor fellow is shell-shocked, shakes all over, sobs, and is in a severe state of anxiety. To get back to us he had dodged mortars and air bursts and had stepped on a dud mine--its cap fluttering two feet into the air but the mine not going off. He is incoherent at the moment."

------

"Frequently the narrow road crosses and re-crosses the creek over small wooden bridges. These are usually demolished and we cross on the debris strewn around them. I witness the entire battalion crosss over one such obstacle, except for the last man, who is unfortunate enough to have his foot blown off by a shoe{Schu} mine. How 450 men have crossed over the same path and avoided stepping on that mine is almost unbelievable!"

-----

"Another axiom in seizing an objective seems to be this: never take the easiest and hence obvious route such as a main highway or a secondary road. The Germans expect you to come this way, and therefore such routes are heavily mined and defended. The route to take instead is the most illogical one to the enemy and the most difficult one for us. This means mountain climbing, and that is after all what we practiced for months."

-----

"The next hazard is the crossing of the 2-mile-wide meadow at the foot of Mount La Fine. I am positive that the meadow is heavily mined and zeroed in. At 10-yard intervals the men of my battalion leave the oak forest and commence their treacherous walk across the flat, open plain. I feel as though I am embarking on my death march as I follow the troops across the meadow. Will I survive the assault on La Fine? I am scared to death yet can't afford to show it. The chaplain and I walk together. It is definitely comforting to have him at my side. I know he is a better Christian than I am. God will surely spare him, and if He does I, walking with him, will probably be spared also. I have suddenly become a superstitious foxhole Christian."

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#14

HOW ABOUT CARRYING A LITTER DOWN A MOUNTAIN TRAIL, PEOPLE SHOULD READ ABOUT THE NORTH APPENINES.

 

Now that you mention Italy, you should read this book:

"Long Walk Through War" by Klaus H. Huebner. Sub-title: A Combat Doctor's Diary.

Captain Huebner was assigned as Battalion Surgeon for 3rd Battalion, 349th Infantry Regiment, 88th "Blue Devils" Infantry Division. Even though his title was a doctor, his job was to patch up the wounded and relay them back to a Field Hospital where they would actually be treated. He was of German descent and spoke German. His book follows the soldiers as they move through Italy where he would set up his medical aid station at any available farm house, cave, clump of trees or whatever was available.

His book provides a good look at the job of the medic and what the fighting was like in Italy.

 

Quotes from Captain Klaus Huebner, medical officer with 351st Regiment,

"Bracing my hands to get up, I almost set off a mine buried directly in front of me. In my stupidity and gripped with panic, I have jumped into a mine field! I must get back on the highway. I muster all the strength I have left and, sidestepping dangerously exposed mines like a football player does would-be tacklers, leap back onto the road. … The irony of it all is that while I was gone, my guide arrived. The poor fellow is shell-shocked, shakes all over, sobs, and is in a severe state of anxiety. To get back to us he had dodged mortars and air bursts and had stepped on a dud mine--its cap fluttering two feet into the air but the mine not going off. He is incoherent at the moment."

------

"Frequently the narrow road crosses and re-crosses the creek over small wooden bridges. These are usually demolished and we cross on the debris strewn around them. I witness the entire battalion crosss over one such obstacle, except for the last man, who is unfortunate enough to have his foot blown off by a shoe{Schu} mine. How 450 men have crossed over the same path and avoided stepping on that mine is almost unbelievable!"

-----

"Another axiom in seizing an objective seems to be this: never take the easiest and hence obvious route such as a main highway or a secondary road. The Germans expect you to come this way, and therefore such routes are heavily mined and defended. The route to take instead is the most illogical one to the enemy and the most difficult one for us. This means mountain climbing, and that is after all what we practiced for months."

-----

"The next hazard is the crossing of the 2-mile-wide meadow at the foot of Mount La Fine. I am positive that the meadow is heavily mined and zeroed in. At 10-yard intervals the men of my battalion leave the oak forest and commence their treacherous walk across the flat, open plain. I feel as though I am embarking on my death march as I follow the troops across the meadow. Will I survive the assault on La Fine? I am scared to death yet can't afford to show it. The chaplain and I walk together. It is definitely comforting to have him at my side. I know he is a better Christian than I am. God will surely spare him, and if He does I, walking with him, will probably be spared also. I have suddenly become a superstitious foxhole Christian."

No offense meant Custerman, but I don't have to read books, I wuz there, Oct. '43 to Sept. '45. Talking about schu mines. How about a dead kraut with a fountain pen in shirt pocket and a wire around pen going to A BOOBY TRAP. seen what schu mines can do. Buut the book is right. AID stations were wherever there was a little cover, even next to a haystack. Roque

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#15

Joe my dear. I am sorry that things have been so darned rough for you this past week or so.

 

Of course we never want you to stop posting. I don't think anyone here would wish that. I apologize if we took your post the wrong way. Sometimes thing do not translate in just plain written words.

 

Keep posting my friend and love and best wishes to all in your family of course. Hang in there trooper, you always have us. :wub::wub:

Marion J Chard
Proud Daughter of Walter (Monday) Poniedzialek
540th Engineer Combat Regiment, 2833rd Bn, H&S Co, 4th Platoon
There's "No Bridge Too Far"
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#16
Dear Joe please hang in there we need you here, I'll keep my finger crossed for your wife and your son.
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