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  2. Farewell, sir. Thank you for your service!
  3. CaptO

    The Korean War Project - Is this Goodbye?

    It's a great, fun city. Getting around as someone who doesn't speak English is pretty easy. Do the DMZ tour - it's something you must see!
  4. Posted by Linda Cautaert on FB. Rest in Peace, my veteran friend John McAuliffe (6 Oct. 1923 - 9 Dec. 2019) John was one of our own. He will greatly missed. Spoke with him on the phone, last year. Was always good to hear from him. Rest in peace dear friend.'
  5. Walt's Daughter

    The Korean War Project - Is this Goodbye?

    Love your photos, as always. Kai-Ann, Jessica and I want to go to Seoul someday.
  6. Walt's Daughter

    247th Combat Engineers Company A

    Good luck with your surgery, and thanks for posting the info on your grandfather.
  7. Walt's Daughter

    Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day 2019

    Thanks for sharing that, Todd! Wishing you and your family all the best. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.
  8. Earlier
  9. My hypothesis: http://bit.ly/2kuNrkJ. If you have more information about it I will be grateful if you want to share it.
  10. My grandfather, PFC Wendell W. Townsend, served with the 247th Combat Engineers and was in Company A. I have very little information because he passed away at the age of 47 & I was only 18 months old.  I have everything of his that he had from WWII, which includes a couple of maps, his DD-214, a Red Cross letter informing him of his mother’s death & a company roster. Does anyone on the forum have a family member who served with the 247th, Company A? I am currently in Germany for surgery and we are planning to drive to Jülich where the 247th completed bridge construction for crossing the Roer River. I’ve attached a few pictures (not great quality because I had the maps framed when my dad gave them to me).
  11. Rebecca

    247th Engineers

    My grandfather, PFC Wendell W. Townsend, served with the 247th Combat Engineers and was in Company A. I have very little information because he passed away at the age of 47 & I was only 18 months old. I have everything of his that he had from WWII, which includes a couple of maps, his DD-214, a Red Cross letter informing him of his mother’s death & a company roster. I am currently in Germany for surgery and we are planning to drive to Jülich where the 247th completed bridge construction for crossing the Roer River. I’ve attached a few pictures (not great quality because I had the maps framed when my dad gave them to me).
  12. Quick post about something I saw today: https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/presidential-proclamation-national-pearl-harbor-remembrance-day-2019/ Presidential Proclamation on National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2019 Issued on: December 6, 2019 Seventy-eight years ago today, the course of our Nation’s history was forever altered by the surprise attack at Pearl Harbor on Oahu, Hawaii. On National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, we solemnly remember the tragic events of that morning and honor those who perished in defense of our Nation that day and in the ensuing 4 years of war. Just before 8 a.m. on December 7, 1941, airplanes launched from the Empire of Japan’s aircraft carriers dropped bombs and torpedoes from the sky, attacking our ships moored at Naval Station Pearl Harbor and other military assets around Oahu. Following this swift assault, the United States Pacific Fleet and most of the Army and Marine airfields on the island were left decimated. Most tragically, 2,335 American service members and 68 civilians were killed, marking that fateful day as one of the deadliest in our Nation’s history. Despite the shock of the attack, American service members at Pearl Harbor fought back with extraordinary courage and resilience. Sprinting through a hailstorm of lead, pilots rushed to the few remaining planes and took to the skies to fend off the incoming Japanese attackers. Soldiers on the ground fired nearly 300,000 rounds of ammunition and fearlessly rushed to the aid of their wounded brothers in arms. As a solemn testament to the heroism that abounded that day, 15 American servicemen were awarded the Medal of Honor — 10 of which were awarded posthumously. In one remarkable act of bravery, Doris “Dorie” Miller, a steward aboard the USS West Virginia, manned a machine gun and successfully shot down multiple Japanese aircraft despite not having been trained to use the weapon. For his valor, Miller was awarded the Navy Cross and was the first African-American recognized with this honor. In the wake of this heinous attack, the United States was left stunned and wounded. Yet the dauntless resolve of the American people remained unwavering and unbreakable. In his address to the Congress the following day, broadcast to the Nation over radio, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt assured us that “[w]ith confidence in our armed forces, with the unbounding determination of our people, we will gain the inevitable triumph.” In the days, months, and years that followed, the full might of the American people, industry, and military was brought to bear on our enemies. Across the Atlantic and Pacific, 16 million American servicemen and women fought to victory, making the world safe for freedom and democracy once again. More than 400,000 of these brave men and women never returned home, giving their last full measure of devotion for our Nation. While nearly eight decades have passed since the last sounds of battle rang out over Pearl Harbor, we will never forget the immeasurable sacrifices these courageous men and women made so that we may live today in peace and prosperity. We continue to be inspired by the proud legacy left by the brave patriots of the Greatest Generation who served in every capacity during World War II, from keeping factories operating on the home front to fighting on the battlefields in Europe, North Africa, and the South Pacific. Their incredible heroism, dedication to duty, and love of country continue to embolden our drive to create a better world and galvanize freedom-loving people everywhere under a common cause. On this day, we resolve forever to keep the memory of the heroes of Pearl Harbor alive as a testament to the tremendous sacrifices they made in defense of freedom and all that we hold dear. The Congress, by Public Law 103-308, as amended, has designated December 7 of each year as “National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day.” NOW, THEREFORE, I, DONALD J. TRUMP, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim December 7, 2019, as National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day. I encourage all Americans to observe this solemn day of remembrance and to honor our military, past and present, with appropriate ceremonies and activities. I urge all Federal agencies and interested organizations, groups, and individuals to fly the flag of the United States at half-staff in honor of those American patriots who died as a result of their service at Pearl Harbor. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of December, in the year of our Lord two thousand nineteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-fourth. DONALD J. TRUMP
  13. CaptO

    The Korean War Project - Is this Goodbye?

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/e4aCdjbswks6tpcn6 Pictures from my 2014 trip to Seoul and the DMZ
  14. Walt's Daughter

    The Korean War Project - Is this Goodbye?

    Pleased to note that the Korean War website is still viable.
  15. Walt's Daughter

    Devilbiss High School Heroes - Summer 2018

    Sept 2019 DeVilbiss High School Heroes Sept 2019.pdf
  16. Walt's Daughter

    39th Engineer Newsletters

    Newsletter June 2019 39th_Engineer_Newsletter_June_2019.pdf
  17. Walt's Daughter

    286th Army Combat Engineers Co B

    I am going to place a few links here. Even if you've seen these before, maybe they will help others. Interview with Louis Charles Gerken Library of Congress - 286th WorldCat Identities - 286th American Battle Monuments Commission - Frank C May Jr Together We Served - 286th Battle of the Bulge - states on this page that Units at Unknown Locations There are many units that received recognition for participation in the Ardennes-Alsace campaign. This is a list of some of those units so recognized but for which I have yet to determine their geographic location during the Battle of the Bulge. If you have information on these, please let me know. 260th Engineer Combat Battalion 275th Engineer Combat Battalion 281st Engineer Combat Battalion 286th Engineer Combat Battalion 289th Engineer Combat Battalion 290th Engineer Combat Battalion 294th Engineer Combat Battalion 297th Engineer Combat Battalion 298th Engineer Combat Battalion 301st Engineer Combat Battalion 303rd Engineer Combat Battalion 304th Engineer Combat Battalion 305th Engineer Combat Battalion United States Holocaust Memorial Museum - Building the bridges to victory : the story of the 286th combat engineer battalion from France to Germany to a concentration camp and to Austria : an interview and research report / by Tom Mueller. This is not digitized. You have to visit the library/archives Consulate General of France in Los Angeles - 10 WWII veterans received the Legion of Honor in San Diego 286th Engineer Combat Bn - H&S Company Obit - John T McDonough 549th Eng Light Ponton Co -( mentions the 289th) In the European Theater of Operations it was often just ahead or behind the 289th Engineer Combat Battalion during the months of March, April, and May 1945. At various points it detached a platoon to the 289th and traded an officer back and forth in April.[2] On April 1, 1945, the detached 1st Platoon enjoyed Easter Dinner with the 289th at the Mudau Hotel in Mudau, Germany. Looks like there is an available book from librarycat,org - Building the Bridges to Victory: The Story of the 286th Combat Engineer Battalion from France to Germany to a Concentration Camp and to Austria: An Interview and Research Report by Thomas S Mueller - paperback, 2007. But it says it's currently unavailable on Amazon. Library Thing lists it. I would visit that site. World Cat shows it's available at several libraries. The Ultimate Sacrifice and History 286 Engineer Combat Bn - based on a map by Alexander, July 1945 Unit Citation and Campaign Participation Credit Register On US Senator Johnny Isakson's site Available at the Eisenhower Library in Box 636 - info on the 286th GIs Remember - Dan Evers -Dachau Corps of Engineers: The War Against Germany - pg 487 1944 Troop Ship Crossings - see 44 -10-22 Obit - Robert J McKean Jr Senate Confirms VA Watchdog Louis Gerken - via LinkedIn Herald Tribune - Officer's Leadership Remembered Prof DR George Leitmann Obit - John Austin Lepter This PDF file on the 549th Engineer Light Ponton Co - says it mentions the 289th! Obit Carl W Roggenbaum Obit Harold J Allen PhD Obit Theodore M Justyk Congressional Record Online - speaks of Dan Evers of the 286th 63rd Infantry Division mentions 286th Engineer Bn.pdf
  18. Walt's Daughter

    286th Army Combat Engineers Co B

    Welcome to the forum, Jon. So pleased to hear that you were able to obtain a lot of information from my site. I hope we will be able to supply you with more info. I have one book I am going to look into for you, this afternoon.
  19. Walt's Daughter

    2827th Engineer Battalion

    This topic is for the 2827th. Jon, please post your request with a new topic. Thanks!
  20. Jon Blankenship

    2827th Engineer Battalion

    I’d like any info on the 286th combat engineers thank you
  21. Can you post the pictures my uncle served in the 286. Thank you 

  22. Jon Blankenship

    286th Army Combat Engineers Co B

    My name is Jon Blankenship from South Carolina. My uncle Charles P. Blankenship served in Europe 1944-45. He was a very young 1st Sgt. in the 286th Combat Engineers Co B. He served in The Colmar Pocket, built Bailey bridges over the Rhine and on into Germany. He left. Clemson University at the age of 18 to serve his country. He experienced the 3rd Reich’s horrors first hand and head on being able to return to the US in 1946. He suffered severe PTSD but was able to overcome his terrible memories of the war and lead a very productive and fulfilling life to age 89. He never spoke of his time in service. My cousins and I would ask our grandmother(his mom) about his time in WW2 as curious youngsters. She would only tell us bits and pieces. So... since his death 4 years ago, I started looking into his Army records and such. I have been able to find his mooring reports and a lot of other valuable info. My research has become a favorite hobby of mine. I am really pleased I found this website to continue on my research. I look forward to meeting anyone that can help with his unit and I will gladly share any info that I have as well. Thank you.
  23. Walt's Daughter

    John William "Bill" Wilkerson

    Yes, you go to the VA's site. I called them and that is how I received my dad's discharge papers. BTW, I just tried the link and it works correctly. It took me to the VA's site. You must have clicked on the link directly above it. https://www.va.gov/find-locations/?facilityType=vet_center
  24. BobbInND

    John William "Bill" Wilkerson

    Thank you for your time and the information. I do have a question though. I went to the VA site suggested in the How to Research, but it leads directly back to the National Archives. Am I missing something? Should I go to the Local VA Office and request it directly through them? Bobb
  25. theron

    John William "Bill" Wilkerson

    Hi... 1. Try the VA. They have records that might amaze you. My father's VA file (different than the St. Louis records) even had an evacuation tag from when he was with an AAA outfit near Seattle! You can request the files as next of kin and have the file sent to a lcal VA office wehre you can read it and take notes. The file should show his duty stations throughout his service time as well as other information. 2. Look to the county clerk of the county in which he lived upon his return to the States. and seek out his Discharge papers. Often (not always) States gave a small bounty to vets who filed a copy of their discharge. If the County doesn't have it, then sometimes the State has it.If it is in Illinois, you will need to be next of kin also. 3. Once you ID his unit, then you can obtain copies of unit records from the National Archives (NARA on line) including monthly summaries, After Action Reports, message logs and other miscellaneous reports/documents. Not all units kept good records, and not all records made it to The National Archives...but well worth a shot. ALSO, if you have the unit, you MIGHT be able to find daily reports in St. Louis that were missed by the fire in '73.
  26. My wife's father's records were a part of those burned up in the fire. She has absolutely no idea of anything about his military service other than the following: He was from Benton, Franklin County, Illinois b. 22 APR 1924 and d. 02 AUG 1977 in Lincoln, Logan County, Illinois. Her served in the Pacific. His last known duty assignment was at Camp Stoneman in California. He supposedly worked on heavy equipment. I realize that is not a whole lot to go on, but it is what she has. I am willing to look through all of the rosters ever assigned to Camp Stoneman, if anyone can point me to where I might be able to find them, but it would seem to be, that due to the Camp Stoneman posting, and the fact that he worked on heavy equipment, he would likely have been attached to one of the Engineer organizations located there. Thank you for any time, information or suggestions you might be able to provide. Respectfully, Bobb Craig, ETC, USN, Ret.
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