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      Upgrade July 26,2017   07/27/17

      We had an upgrade to the system this morning and I had to temporarily disable the theme/colors/look-feel of the forum. The forum was acting strangely and was moving along at a snails pace, so had to perform some tests. After I disabled all the customizations, things improved immensely, so... I am hoping to add our colors back, but till then...bear with me. Thanks!
    • Walt's Daughter

      Advertisers   08/12/17

      If you would like to advertise on my VI Corps site, please let me know. However, all ads must be directly related to WWII. Are you an author? Are you conducting tours? Are you a researcher? Prices are very reasonable, for aren't we here to benefit each other? Looking forward to hearing from you. 

      Viewers, please note, there WILL NOT be giant pop-up ads on my site. Nothing infuriates me more than going to someone's site and having to scroll past obnoxious, in your face ads or ones that are stuck in the middle of articles, forcing you to scroll further down the page to see the rest of the paragraphs. They will be tasteful, appropriately places small banners.
buk2112

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That man is so creepy! I have a lot of other adjectives for him too.

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Now that is simply fantastic. What a great story with a happy ending!

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Seen this story in the St. Louis Post Dispatch, about Marine Private Palmer S. Haraldson whose remains were recently identified and are to be buried today in his home town in Iowa.

 

http://www.stltoday.com/remains-of-marine-killed-in-ww-ii-to-be-buried/article_35ed480a-f68a-5324-99b8-845b5bfb06b1.html

 

Welcome home Pvt. Haraldson :14_1_107v:

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Just read this obituary online about Holocaust survivor Joseph Harmatz. Don't believe I have ever heard of the incident that is described in his bio. He was part of a group that tried to poison thousands of Nazis in a P.O.W. camp shortly after the end of the war in Europe. Most interesting.

 

http://www.stltoday.com/news/world/jewish-wwii-avenger-joseph-harmatz-dead-at/article_3b8311f8-1901-5201-86c5-927216187e96.html

 

R.I.P. Mr. Harmatz

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Will read that later. Getting ready to eat dinner. But neither Colin Hotham or I had heard about that. He is here with me in Maryland, for we just finished our WWII reunion and are now vacationing with two other attendees. Thanks for the interesting post!

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Will read that later. Getting ready to eat dinner. But neither Colin Hotham or I had heard about that. He is here with me in Maryland, for we just finished our WWII reunion and are now vacationing with two other attendees. Thanks for the interesting post!

 

Hope you,Colin, and the gang are having a wonderful time,enjoy!

 

Randy

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There is an effort underway to award former OSS agents the Congressional Gold Medal, let's hope they get it.

 

http://www.stltoday.com/news/national/effort-to-recognize-world-war-ii-spies-hung-up-in/article_d5cf9063-2aed-5aac-b059-f278db35be8f.html

 

Randy

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Unfortunately when I went to the site, it was filled with tons of ads and all the lines of the article were grayed out. 

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Same.

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Wow, now this is out there!

 

 

 

 

Colorado woman's remains found under grave of WWII veteran

  • By THOMAS PEIPERT Associated Press

 

DENVER (AP) — A Colorado man who pleaded guilty Friday to killing his estranged wife more than two decades ago recently led authorities to her body, which was buried under the grave of a World War II veteran.

John Sandoval, 52, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder and was sentenced to 25 years in prison for the 1995 death of Kristina Tournai-Sandoval.

As part of a plea deal, he told investigators March 22 the remains were buried at a Greeley cemetery.

 

Sandoval found an open gravesite early in the morning on Oct. 20, 1995, that was scheduled for a burial that afternoon. Prosecutors say he dug about 2 feet (0.61 meters) below the grave and buried Tournai-Sandoval's body, which was wrapped in several layers of industrial-grade plastic.

Cemetery workers then unknowingly buried the veteran over her remains.

That day, detectives found a wet and muddy shovel in Sandoval's car and muddy clothes inside his home. After he was arrested, investigators noticed scratch marks on his face, neck and chest.

 
 
 
 

Charges were not filed at the time because authorities could not find the body, any witnesses or a crime scene.

"For 7,826 days, 3 hours and 22 minutes, the location of Tina's remains has been a mystery," Weld County District Attorney Michael Rourke said in a news release Friday. "Over the course of the last week, we have finally been able to give her family what they so desperately wanted."

 

Sandoval was convicted in 2010 of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison. But an appeals court overturned his conviction last year, ruling a judge wrongfully allowed evidence that Sandoval stalked other women, as well as expert testimony correlating stalkers with murderers.

Prosecutors had been preparing for a new trial when Sandoval acknowledged knowing the location of his wife's body.

Court records show Sandoval had met with his wife to settle a debt before finalizing their divorce. Before the meeting, she warned family members that if anything happened to her, her husband was responsible. She also arranged to talk with her sister by phone after the meeting.

 
 
 

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What a strange story! I would be very upset if I were the family of the WWII Vet!

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Just love these kind of stories!

 

ID bracelet lost by US soldier during WWII found in France

 

SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) — An identification bracelet lost by a soldier from central New York more than 70 years ago has been found near the beaches of Normandy.

WSTM-TV in Syracuse reports (http://bit.ly/2nHyhUy ) Army Sgt. John Hill, of Syracuse, landed in France on June 7, 1944, a day after the Allied invasion began.

 

Somewhere along the way, he lost the ID bracelet given to him by his mother. During World War II it was common for service members to be given the bracelets by loved-ones before being sent overseas.

In February, Matthieu Delamontte found a bracelet with Hill's name and serial number while using a metal detector in a field near Normandy. He tracked down the 93-year-old veteran with the help of a Syracuse librarian.

The two men recently met on Skype. Delamontte will be sending the bracelet to Hill soon.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Finally coming home: Remains of missing World War II serviceman returning to family

POSTED 1:54 PM, APRIL 12, 2017, BY FOX8WEBCENTRAL, UPDATED AT 03:01PM, APRIL 12, 2017
 

CLEVELAND HEIGHTS, Ohio -- The remains of a U.S. serviceman missing from World War II have been accounted for and will finally be returned to his family.

Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Marvin B. Rothman, of Cleveland Heights, was 21 when he was assigned to the 311th Fighter Squadron, 58th Fighter Squadron Group on April 11, 1944.

He was the pilot of a single-seat P-47D Thunderbolt on a bombing escort mission with 15 other Thunderbolts to Wewak, Territory of New Guinea, when he was attacked by an enemy fighter aircraft.

When the escort flight returned from the mission, Rothman and two other pilots were reported missing, according to a release from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

The War Department declared Rothman deceased as of Feb. 6, 1946.

In September 1946, a U.S. infantry officer informed the American Graves Registration Service in New Guinea that an Australian War Graves team had recovered the remains of a suspected American airman. They'd found the wreckage of an aircraft with a partial serial number matching that of Rothman's plane.

In November 1946, AGRS personnel tried to confirm his identity based on dental records. But the dental charts were incomplete, and an ID could not be established.

Based on the lack of evidence, an AGRS board declared Rothman to be non-recoverable in January 1950.

Then, in July 2004, a contractor for the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command investigated a crash site found by residents in a New Guinea village. They also found the plate matching the serial number of Rothman's plane.

A U.S. recovery team returned to the site in August 2009 and recovered possible human remains and other artifacts.

Scientists were able to use anthropological and circumstantial evidence along with dental analysis, which then matched Rothman's records.

Rothman's name is recorded on the Walls of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery along with other MIAs from WWII. A rosette will also be placed next to his name to indicate he has been accounted for.

Rothman will be buried April 19 with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery.

 

58f79a2b6a8a2_download(13).jpg.efdcd3e506f8b74d6f92f536c8b45695.jpg

Welcome home sir!

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Man who stole 90-year-old copy of 'Mein Kampf' from Collinsville museum was 'fascinated' by it, police say

 
 
 

COLLINSVILLE • A man stole a 90-year-old copy of Adolf Hitler’s “Mein Kampf” from the historical museum here because he was “fascinated by it,” police say.

Robert Charles LeCompte, 30, of 201 John Street in Collinsville, was charged Friday with one count each of burglary and theft, both felonies.

Surveillance footage caught a man later identified as LeCompte walking out of the Collinsville Historical Museum February 21 with a special edition of the Nazi dictator’s book that was printed in Munich in 1927 and presented to Nazi leaders, police said. The book is estimated to be worth at least $3,000 and possibly up to $10,000.

 

The video shows LeCompte walking up to the book, which was in an unlocked glass case on a bottom shelf. The video then shows him looking around to see if anyone was watching him, taking the book out of the case and walking out of the building, Assistant Police Chief Rich Wittenauer said.

“He was in there for less than 46 seconds,” he said. “You could tell from the video that he’d been there before and knew where it was.”

Museum officials didn’t notice the book was gone until April 4. Police released surveillance photos Wednesday of a suspect later identified as LeCompte.

Tips were called in to police as soon as the photos were put on the department’s Facebook page, Wittenauer said. On Thursday, a few hours before he was arrested, LeCompte dropped the book off at the museum. “He knew we were looking for him,” Wittenauer said.

 
 

Officers on Collinsville Road in State Park Place later spotted a car belonging to a man they knew to be a friend of LeCompte’s, police said. Officers approached the car after it pulled into gas station lot in the 8400 block of Collinsville Road.

 

When the officers got to the car to talk to the driver, they saw LeCompte lying on the floor in the back of the car, police said. He was taken into custody without incident and his bail was set at $60,000.

LeCompte admitted stealing the book, police said.

“He would only say that he was just ‘fascinated by it,’” Wittenauer said. “He wouldn’t talk about it after that.”

The book had been given to the museum by the family of the late Irving Dilliard, a Collinsville resident who obtained it while an Army officer in Europe during World War II. Dilliard, who died in 2002, was a retired editor of the Post-Dispatch editorial page. He also was a past president of the Illinois State Historical Society.

Museum officials declined comment. They told police they would take the book out of display and were considering permanently removing it from public viewing, according to a police news release.

 

 
 

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Weird!!!

 

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WWII painting stolen by Nazis to rotate between Paris and US

 

 

NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — An 1886 painting that was stolen as part of a Nazi looting campaign that stretched across Europe during World War II has transferred from the University of Oklahoma to Paris.

The Oklahoman (http://bit.ly/2pi2PPe ) reports the painting, "Shepherdess Bringing in Sheep," will be on display at the French museum, Musee d'Orsay, for five years before returning to the university in alternating three-year intervals.

 

The rotating display arrangement is part of a settlement agreement between the university and Leone Meyer, whose father, Raoul Meyer, owned the painting during the German occupation of Paris in WWII.

 

Leone Meyer sued the university to recover the painting, which has been with the university since 2000. The settlement reached acknowledges Meyer's inheritance rights.

 

University of Oklahoma President David Boren says "a fair and just resolution among all parties has been reached."

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From yesterday's St. Louis Post Dispatch, gotta love these kind of stories!

 

 

World War II vet reunited with love letter 72 years later

  • May 11, 2017
  • WESTFIELD, N.J. (AP) — A love letter lost in the walls of a New Jersey home reached a World War II veteran 72 years after it was written.

Melissa Fahy and her father found the letter in a gap under the stairs while renovating her Westfield home.

The letter, postmarked May 1945, was written by a woman named Virginia to her husband, Rolf Christoffersen. Her husband was a sailor at the time in the Norwegian Navy.

 

"I love you Rolf, as I love the warm sun," Virginia Christoffersen wrote. "That is what you are to my life, the sun about which everything else revolves for me."

 

Fahy told WNBC-TV in New York that she could not believe the love and admiration Virginia had for her husband. "It was really sweet to see that long-distance love," she said.

She decided to find the Christoffersens and deliver the letter, turning to a Facebook page for help. Facebook users located the couple's son in California hours after Fahy's post.

 

The son read the letter to his 96-year-old father. Virginia died six years ago this weekend.

"In a way, I guess it's his wife coming back and making her memory alive again," Fahy said.

 
 

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Goes to show you never know what might occur, even after decades. :wub:

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Bones found near wreckage of US bomber in Croatia

  • Jul 10, 2017

 

ZAGREB, Croatia (AP) — Divers have located human bones near the wreckage of a U.S. bomber that crashed in the Adriatic Sea in Croatia in 1944.

The discovery was made last week at the site of the crash of The Tulsamerican, the last B-24 Liberator bomber built in Tulsa, Oklahoma, near the end of World War II, according to Croatia's state TV.

"The remains of human bones have been found, but we can't say anything without further analysis," Zadar University archaeologist Mate Parica said.

The wreckage itself was found at the bottom of the sea at a depth of some 40 meters (130 feet) near the island of Vis in 2010 after a 17-year search. Three members of the 10-man crew were killed in the crash.

Tomo Medved, who heads Croatia's ministry for war veterans, said the U.S. is still looking for some 200 Americans who perished in Croatia during WWII. Croatia was run by a Nazi puppet regime during the war. Medved pledged the country's cooperation.

"We will launch the procedure to sign an agreement between our countries so that we would find the remains of some 200 people that the United States is searching for in the territory of the Republic of Croatia," he said.

An effort to recover and return pieces of the wreckage to Oklahoma for display at the Tulsa Air and Space Museum has been underway for several years.

The plane was hit after a bombing run over German-occupied Poland. It crashed into the Adriatic Sea on Dec. 17, 1944. The crew apparently tried to get the plane back to its base in Italy, but they eventually decided to ditch it in the Adriatic.

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Thanks for posting. Always wonderful to see images we haven't seen before. However I have to agree with several who posted, what the heck were they thinking with the fancy font? Yikes. Guess someone wanted to make a statement, but the images are enough. A simple Arial or similar would have made it easier on the eyes. :-)

 

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USS Indianapolis discovered 18,000 feet below Pacific surface

  • By Emanuella Grinberg, CNN
  •  
    • Aug 20, 2017

 

It's been 72 years since the USS Indianapolis went missing after a Japanese submarine torpedoed it in the final days of World War II.

A team of civilian researchers led by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen discovered the cruiser's wreckage Friday on the floor of the Pacific Ocean, 18,000 feet below the surface. The discovery brings a measure of closure to one of most tragic maritime disasters in US naval history.

"To be able to honor the brave men of the USS Indianapolis and their families through the discovery of a ship that played such a significant role in ending World War II is truly humbling," Allen said.

 

"As Americans, we all owe a debt of gratitude to the crew for their courage, persistence and sacrifice in the face of horrendous circumstances. While our search for the rest of the wreckage will continue, I hope everyone connected to this historic ship will feel some measure of closure at this discovery so long in coming."

The Indianapolis sank in 12 minutes, making it impossible for it to send a distress signal or deploy life-saving equipment. Before the attack, on July 30, 1945, it had just completed a secret mission delivering components of the atomic bomb used in Hiroshima that brought an end to the war in the Pacific, according to the Naval History and Heritage Command in Washington.

Most of the ship's 1,196 sailors and Marines survived the sinking only to succumb to exposure, dehydration, drowning and shark attacks. Only 316 survived, according to the US Navy. Of the survivors, 22 are alive today.

'Lost in a sea of tears'

Michael William Emery, named after his uncle William Friend Emery, who perished in the sinking, said he was in shock that the wreckage had been found.

"I am filled with so much emotion. Part of me wanted the Indy to be found, part of me did not want it to be found. Memories of nightmares I had as a child trying to rescue my uncle and namesake William Friend Emery off of his ship are overwhelming me now," he said in quotes provided by Sara Vladic, a spokeswoman for a network of survivors.

Emery said he was thinking about those who loved his uncle and had passed before the ship's discovery: "After 72 years, the Indy might've finally been found, but I'm still lost in a sea of tears."

Earl O'Dell Henry Jr., son of Lt. Cmdr. Earl O'Dell Henry, who was the Indianapolis's dentist, said his family regarded the ship as his father's burial site.

 
 
 
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"My reaction was just an overwhelming numbness, followed by deep sobbing and crying. This despite I have anticipated the possibility of this news for some time. My wife and I both started crying uncontrollably. While shaving, I noticed that my eyes were the reddest I have ever seen them. I don't think I have cried this hard in my adult life," he said.

He said the ship's finding would have broken his mother's heart.

"My mother would be torn to pieces if she were still living. She did not want them to ever find the ship, partially because she thought the ship would be disturbed (which I do not think will happen). But I am glad she does not have to cry today," he said.

 

Barb and Dave Stamm -- relatives of sinking survivor Florian Stamm -- said they were happy to hear of the discovery.

"The spirit of the Indy is awake and will be memorialized forever. Those 'Lost at Sea' have been found," they said.

Efforts to find the wreck

"Even in the worst defeats and disasters there is valor and sacrifice that deserves to never be forgotten," Sam Cox, director of the Naval History and Heritage Command, said. "They can serve as inspiration to current and future sailors enduring situations of mortal peril. There are also lessons learned, and in the case of the Indianapolis, lessons re-learned, that need to be preserved and passed on, so the same mistakes can be prevented, and lives saved."

Others have tried to locate the Indianapolis before. The wreck was located by the expedition crew of Allen's Research Vessel Petrel, a 250-foot vessel equipped with state-of-the-art equipment capable of diving to 6,000 meters, or 3 1/2 miles.

The 13-person team will continue to survey the site and tour of the wreckage in compliance with relevant US law for searching war graves.

Research surfaced in 2016 that led to a new search area to the west of the original presumed position. Richard Hulver, a historian with the Naval History and Heritage Command, identified a naval landing craft that recorded a sighting of Indianapolis hours before it was hit. The information led the research team to a new position and estimated search area for Allen's team.

Allen has had another search success. In 2015, after an eight-year hunt, his team of researchers found the Japanese battleship Musashi in the Philippines' Sibuyan Sea.

 

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