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It's amazing what keeps turning up after decades and decades. We see that all the time here on the forum. 

 

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Body of St. Louis-born WWII soldier listed as missing will go to central Illinois for burial

  • The State Journal-Register, Springfield, Ill.
  •  
    • Oct 22, 2017

Army Staff Sgt. Michael Aiello

 
 

 

The remains of a St. Louis-born man who was listed as missing in action after a battle in the Netherlands during World War II will be heading to central Illinois for burial Wednesday.

The remains of Army Staff Sgt. Michael Aiello will arrive in St. Louis a little after 3 p.m., according to PJ Staab II of Staab Funeral Home in Springfield. There will then be a procession up Interstate 55 to the town of Sherman, Ill., where Aiello lived after moving from St. Louis as a child.

Aiello was born in 1909 in St. Louis. Three years later, his family moved to Sherman where he attended grade school. After finishing the eighth grade, Aiello became a coal miner at the age of 13.

 

Aiello’s family moved to Springfield in 1918. Aiello later owned and operated a restaurant in Springfield, but primarily worked as a coal miner until he entered the Army in 1942.

Within two years, Aiello advanced to the rank of staff sergeant and was assigned to a glider infantry regiment. He was involved in the D-Day Invasion and later in 1944 his unit was assigned to Operation Market Garden in the Netherlands.

 

Operation Market Garden called for glider and airborne troops to seize bridges in the Netherlands and hold them until British armor units arrived. The operation, portrayed in a book and the 1977 movie “A Bridge Too Far,” failed.

 

Military records indicate Aiello went missing Sept. 30, 1944, during fighting near the bridge at Nijmegen. While no remains were officially identified as his, the military issued a presumptive finding of death a year later.

Aiello was 35 when he went missing. About eight years ago, the military disinterred a set of remains that were later identified as Aiello. Relatives in the Springfield area provided DNA samples to confirm the identity.

Aiello will be buried at Camp Butler Cemetery at 10 a.m. Saturday. The ceremony at the cemetery is open to the public.

 

 

 

I was curious to know which unit this soldier belonged since the article did not state it.. After a little cyber snooping I found he was a member of the 401st GIR, 101st Airborne Division.

 

 

Welcome home Staff Sergeant Aiello

 

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Welcome home Staff Sergeant Aiello. Rest in peace.

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Remains of Massachusetts airman lost in WWII identified

 

Remains of Massachusetts airman lost in WWII identified

This undated photo released Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2017, by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, shows Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Richard M. Horwitz, of Brookline, Mass. Horwitz was one of 11 crew members on a B24 Liberator last seen after the Feb. 28, 1945 attack on a railroad bridge in Northern Italy during World War II. The agency said his remains, recovered in 2015, will be buried with full military honors on Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017, in Boston. (Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency via AP)

 

BOSTON (AP) — The remains of a U.S. Army Air Forces officer who went missing after a bombing run over northern Italy in World War II are coming home.

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency says the remains of 2nd Lt. Richard M. Horwitz, of Brookline, will be buried Sunday in Boston with full military honors.

The 22-year-old Horwitz was one of 11 crew members on a B24 Liberator last seen after the Feb. 28, 1945 attack on a railroad bridge.

 

It was determined in 1948 it had crashed in the Adriatic Sea.

 

The wreckage was located by an Italian citizen off the coast of Grado, Italy in 2013, and remains were recovered in 2015.

Horwitz's remains were identified through historical evidence, dental and bone analysis and by comparing DNA to a relative.

 

 

 

 

Welcome home Sir

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The DPAA (http://www.dpaa.mil/) are really unsung heroes of our day. Every week I am hearing about US servicemen being returned to the US after being missing for 75 or more years. It is truly remarkable. I am glad that we in the US still have the will and desire to search for all of our missing servicemen.

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Plane that led Normandy invasion discovered, restored

 
 
Plane that led Normandy invasion discovered, restored
 

This Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, photo shows a C-47 called "That's All, Brother," that was discovered and currently being restored at Basler Turbo Conversions in Oshkosh, Wis. The plane carried the first paratroopers who stormed the beaches of Normandy during World War II. The group, Commemorative Air Force, started a campaign to restore the relic with hopes to fly the aircraft over Normandy in 2019 for the 75th anniversary of D-Day.(WLUK/Alex Ronallo, via AP)

 
 
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OSHKOSH, Wis. (AP) — A plane that led the invasion of Normandy during World War II has been saved from a junkyard and is being carefully restored in Wisconsin.

The C-47, called "That's All, Brother," carried the first paratroopers who were dropped behind German lines at Normandy. The aircraft led the more than 800 other C-47s also carrying paratroopers.

The plane was lost for 70 years and was accidentally discovered by an Air Force historian at the Basler Turbo Conversions junkyard in Oshkosh in 2015, WLUK-TV reported . The historian was researching Col. John Donalson, the man who flew the plane on D-Day.

 

"The airplane is much more than an aircraft. It's a time machine," said Keegan Chetwynd, the curator for the Commemorative Air Force, a nonprofit that works to preserve aircraft.

The group started a campaign to restore the aircraft, raising about $380,000 in 30 days, Chetwynd said. Employees at Basler have spent more than 22,000 hours restoring "That's All, Brother" to former glory.

"(It) provides that tangible connection for the next generation of people so that they know, when they read it in a history book, that it was real," Chetwynd said.

 

Workers tested out "That's All, Brother's" engines for the first time in a decade on Thursday. Despite a hydraulic leak, the test was a major achievement, Chetwynd said. Crews will test the engines again today.

Their hope is to fly the aircraft over Normandy in 2019 for the 75th anniversary of D-Day.

 

"That's kind of why the rush is on and why we're doing all of this in the dead of winter in Wisconsin," Chetwynd said.

The aircraft is expected to conduct a European tour in 2019 and then will likely return to the U.S. to resume regular operations.

 

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Ah, gotta show this to my hubby! Thanks for posting.

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US Army hero dog during WWII receives posthumous medal

 
 
US Army hero dog during WWII receives posthumous medal
 

The Dickin Medal, worn by Military working dog Ayron who received the PDSA Dickin Medal, the animal equivalent of the Victoria Cross, on Chips' behalf, in London, Monday, Jan. 15, 2018. Chips was a US Army dog who protected the lives of his platoon during the invasion of Sicily in 1943. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

 
 

LONDON (AP) — A U.S. Army dog that attacked a machine-gun nest during World War II was posthumously awarded Britain's highest honor for animal bravery on Monday.

Chips, a German shepherd-husky cross, was awarded the Dickin Medal for actions during a 1943 beach landing in Sicily. According to the U.S. soldiers, Chips raced into an Italian machine-gun nest, attacking an enemy soldier by the throat and pulling the gun from its mount.

The medal was awarded by veterinary charity PDSA in a ceremony at the Churchill War Rooms in London. The honor was accepted by 76-year-old John Wren of Southold, New York, whose father donated Chips to the war effort in 1942.

 

Lt. Col. Alan Throop, who attended on behalf of the U.S. Army, said that shortly after the battle Chips was recommended for the Distinguished Service Cross, the Silver Star and the Purple Heart. The awards were later rescinded because army policy didn't allow animals to receive medals.

Chips suffered scalp wounds and powder burns in the battle but survived the war, returning to his owners in Pleasantville, New York.

The medal was awarded on the 75th anniversary of the Casablanca Conference, at which British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt plotted wartime strategy. Chips served as a sentry at the conference and met both leaders.

 

"It has taken over seven decades, but Chips can now finally take his place in the history books as one of the most heroic dogs to serve with the U.S. Army," PDSA director general Jan McLoughlin said.

Since 1943, the Dickin Medal has recognized gallantry by animals serving with the military, police or rescue services. Recipients include 33 dogs, 32 messenger pigeons, four horses and a cat.

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Very cool!  

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