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Walt's Daughter

Malaria in the ETO

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Received a question from a gentleman today and thought I would post this and my response, so all can benefit and join in too, if they wish:

 

================

 

I thank one of our KW vets for leading me to this excellent

resource on malaria in the Korean War era:

http://history.amedd.army.mil/booksdocs/KO...ecad2/ch6-2.htm

It was very helpful.

 

I wonder... any of you who were fighting in Europe in WW2 (or

researching that war) ever hear of malaria there? I doubt it,

as in all the 15 years I've been going to Europe each summer, I

think I've seen only one or two mosquitoes. I know it was a problem in the Pacific theater.

 

=================

 

Malaria was quite prevalent in WWII and not just in the Pacific. This is well-documented and I've many personal stories from my VI Corps vets. Malaria was particularly virulent in North Africa as well as Sicily and Italy.

 

Here are some instances from my forum, that discuss both theaters and personal accounts.

 

http://www.6thcorpscombatengineers.com/eng...ighlite=malaria

 

Here a just a FEW links that discuss malaria in the ETO:

 

http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/VV/Views/Exhib...ive/typhus.html

 

http://history.amedd.army.mil/booksdocs/wwii/orgadmin/

 

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-3395...%3E2.0.CO%3B2-C

 

http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USA/index.html

 

http://www.botgard.ucla.edu/html/botanytex...hona/index.html

 

http://history.amedd.army.mil/ANCWebsite/A...ntroduction.htm

 

Marion Chard

Edited by Walt's Daughter
updated link

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My father served in both WW2 and Korea - he suffered severe bouts with malaria for the rest of his life. I say severe because it sure looked that way to me. Not sure where he picked it up. In fact, shortly before he passed away he was ill with malaria. I don't know if the malaria was a contributing factor with his MI.

tk

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I'm the "gent" asking Marion. I can imagine malaria being a problem in North Africa, Sicily, coastal Mediterranean France, etc. but what about Benelux and Germany? Did you vets have to take daily or weekly pills? Those with answers can e-mail me direct, too: mr.gsd(at)netscape.com, if you'd rather. (I have a terrible time logging on to forums like this... takes me half a day to figure out how). For example, where is the "SEND" icon to click on now??? (I'll try "add reply") Fred

 

Received a question from a gentleman today and thought I would post this and my response, so all can benefit and join in too, if they wish:

================

I thank one of our KW vets for leading me to this excellent resource on malaria in the Korean War era:

http://history.amedd.army.mil/booksdocs/KO...ecad2/ch6-2.htm

It was very helpful.

I wonder... any of you who were fighting in Europe in WW2 (or researching that war) ever hear of malaria there? I doubt it,

as in all the 15 years I've been going to Europe each summer, I think I've seen only one or two mosquitoes. I know it was a problem in the Pacific theater.

=================

Malaria was quite prevalent in WWII and not just in the Pacific. This is well-documented and I've many personal stories from my VI Corps vets. Malaria was particularly virulent in North Africa as well as Sicily and Italy.

Here are some instances from my forum, that discuss both theaters and personal accounts.

http://208.109.212.45/forum/index.php?act=...ighlite=malaria

 

Here a just a FEW links that discuss malaria in the ETO:

http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/VV/Views/Exhib...ive/typhus.html

http://history.amedd.army.mil/booksdocs/wwii/orgadmin/

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-3395...%3E2.0.CO%3B2-C

http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USA/index.html

http://www.botgard.ucla.edu/html/botanytex...hona/index.html

http://history.amedd.army.mil/ANCWebsite/A...ntroduction.htm

 

Marion Chard

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pjo (or tk) and others: I don't know what MI is (other than Military Intelligence). Can you tell me what those "bouts" were like? When did he start getting it (after/during WW2 or during KW?) Wouldn't malarial illness keep a man from eligibility to serve in the armed forces? Did he serve in Northern France-Belgium-Germany? Take pills? Fred mr.gsd(at)netscape.com

 

 

My father served in both WW2 and Korea - he suffered severe bouts with malaria for the rest of his life. I say severe because it sure looked that way to me. Not sure where he picked it up. In fact, shortly before he passed away he was ill with malaria. I don't know if the malaria was a contributing factor with his MI.

tk

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Had malaria twice in Southern Italy. Laid on a strecher for three days and the nurse

piled blankets on me and all they had to give was atebrine and quinine tablets. When I was released I went back UP to my unit following a mule train. Mosquitoes in Italy were like dive

bombers and I swear they carried bayonets. There is a story on my page how my buddy from

Oklahoma controled them. RJR

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This is interesting. It'd make sense that there'd be mosquitoes especially

around the landing areas in Italy. There are the Pontine marshes which were

well known for malaria. The Anzio-Nettuno area was nothing but waterlogged.

My Dad's letters don't mention malaria, but he wouldn't tell his mother or sister

anything negative anyway.

 

My father was in the hospital for two weeks in North Africa, but I have no clue why.

The only reason I even know about it is that it's noted in his 1943 pocket diary:

"in the hospital" and two weeks later: "out of the hospital".

Two weeks is a long time to be in the hospital, isn't it? I'd really like to know why he was there.

 

His 1942 diary has him getting "injections" almost every week. Seriously, he was constantly receiving

shots/ injections at Camp Edwards and Fort Devens. Does anyone know what injections

the GIs were getting? I'd imagine Cholera, Typhus, and tetanus, but what else?

 

mary ann

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What outfit was your father in ? All I remember of North Africa were Krauts,

Arabs and camels. All we got was aterbrine and salt tablets. One for water the other for

heat. I don't remember getting injections, In Italy only when I got Malaria then only tablets.

As far as Anzio,Nettuno, where I was at, it was dry. we were dug in in the walls of dry creeks.

There are some pics of those creeks on my page. Mosquitoes !! yes<yes<. ROCKY OF THE

34th........

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Hi Rocky! My Dad was drafted 3/1941 into the 26th ID 181st IR in MA

and after war was declared, he was 5th army 6 Corps 206th MP Co. The "injections"

he got were while he was still in the States. He shipped out to North Africa

3/1943 and was in & around Rabat and Sidi Bel Abbes and then to Oran to

prepare for the Salerno invasion. All I could get out of my father about his

experience in N. Africa was that it was a terrible hot dirty place and he

didn't care for the inhabitants at all (to put it mildly) because they were always stealing

everything.

 

I'll have to chk out the pictures on your page. I think they filled in some of the areas

like the pontine marshes near anzio sometime in the 1930s, so there must've been dry areas.

For my Dad, I believe Anzio was THE worst. Salerno was bad, the breakout & advance

to Rome was certainly no picnic, and the bitter winter in the Vosges etc had to be terrible -

but I think Anzio was with my father all his life. I've got a picture of him in front of

"Anzio Annie" (I think all the fellows had one taken they must've hated that gun it killed

so many on the beachhead).

 

34th ID - the big red bull, right? In my Dad's kit box there were three division patches

besides his 6th patch. There was the 34th Id's, the 3rd IDs, and the 45th ID.

 

THANK YOU for your service, Rocky!

 

here's a photo of my Dad in Anzio (maybe Aprilia).

 

Mary Ann

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He was exactly right on what he said about No. Africa. Those Ayirabs

would steal anything they could get their hands on. We were near

Sidi Bel Abez for a short while. My worst was MONTE CASSINO, then

Anzio. 3 crossings of the Volturno River. All that is just a memory and

now at my age it gets a little distorted. Went in as abuck private and

after three years came out as a pfc. by act of Congress. Long story on that.

Hope you don't laugh when you see the Pics. Last one is of my wife and me.

She passed away Oct. 9,2006 Roque-(Rocky)

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I was briefly in Morocco many yrs ago as part of a trip to Spain.

It was AWFUL! I couldn't get out of ther fast enough and finally understood

Dad's low opinion of that country. You had an immediate sense that human lives were cheap,

especially women.

 

I took out my Dad's pocket diary for '43 where he'd write notations in his small

handwriting. Here's some of his info:

 

2/22 left Ft Devens 5am arrived FT Dix 5pm - worked till 5am

3/5 left US

3/19 North Africa

3/24 went to Oran

3/25 company split up 25th went to sidi bel abbes

4/4 church sidi bel abbes

4/14 our 1st PX opened

5/16 moved to ???can't make this out - looks like A or C nt Temouchut for night

5/18 rabat

5/27-6/8 he was in the hospital

7/4 Rabat 1st armored and 36ID have big parade

7/7 casablanca

8/2 getting ready to move

8/3 part of company went by train

8/4 left Rabat

8/5 bivouac at La Senica(?)

8/6 arrive Port Aux Poules

8/23 ready to move again

8/26 Oran

8/29-8/31 staging area ? "ASSI-Ben OKBA" (don't know what that is)

9/5 left port at 1600 hours

9/7-9/8 at sea

9/9 boarded LST arrived on beach (looks like 0830hours). air attacks

9/10 moved to bivouac area Paestum. air attacks.

9/11 air attacks night & day

9/12 bivouac area same place

9/22 moved to Battipaglia. able to write home again.

9/27 Rain! first rain we've seen since last April

9/30 moved to Montello. Sleeping in a bldg

10/6 moving again to Avellino

10/12 moving to Maddaloni

10/21 1300 hrs moving out to ? Carrizzia?

10/27 1st PX opened up in Italy

10/29 Recd letters from home, 1st since I've been in Italy

11/1 moving out to Dragoni(?)

11/13 one killed 8 wounded from enemy shells (I assume this is in his MP Co)

11/19 moved to Caprilia(?)

11/25 Thanksgiving Day. Donuts! 2 boxes! (love this notation!)

12/20 Took 1st shower since I've been in Africa & Italy

12/25 Christmas Day. Good day here in Capriati

 

Then of course, like you, it was on to Anzio,the Volturno, Rome, DDAy

Southern France, the Vosges, the Rhine and home alive (thank God!) in March '45.

 

So very sorry to hear about your wife, Rocky. My brother was killed in a car accident

when he was 17 and I was 18 (we were "irish twins" 13 months apart), and

my Dad died in '82 when he was just 70. I was blessed to have my mother until 2004,

but now I'm the only one left. It's not like I've lost them & don't know where they are.

I know EXACTLY where they are, but I keep telling them: "Ok you guys, if I have to get

left behind, the least you can do is send extra love". They do & I'm sure it's the same for you.

We must have some other "missions" to perform & like the Army, we gotta take it whether

we like it or not.

 

Hey Rocky! I feel like a dope, but I can't figure out how to get to your page.

I need instruction.

 

all the very best!

 

Mary Ann (Frank Howard's proud daughter)

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pjo (or tk) and others: I don't know what MI is (other than Military Intelligence). Can you tell me what those "bouts" were like? When did he start getting it (after/during WW2 or during KW?) Wouldn't malarial illness keep a man from eligibility to serve in the armed forces? Did he serve in Northern France-Belgium-Germany? Take pills? Fred mr.gsd(at)netscape.com

 

Mr.GSD - sorry if I'm not replying correctly - I'm new to the forum world :banghead: - I tried to quote but it turned red with a negative sign - until I found this site I didn't even know why people use icons. To answer your question about MI - it's a medical term for heart attack. My mother was a retired nurse so I tend to use some terms she used. We lost her to cancer last year. still struggling with that- I don't remember when he started being ill with malaria but I do remember many times - him in bed for days at a time with chills so bad the the bed actually shook. Mom mentioned it was ongoing after the war but I didn't ask which war. He retired in 1963 and passed away in 1972 - shortly after his 50th birthday. He served in both WW2 and Korea.

tk

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34th ID - the big red bull, right? In my Dad's kit box there were three division patches

besides his 6th patch. There was the 34th Id's, the 3rd IDs, and the 45th ID.

 

Mary Ann: My dad brought home his Red Bull patch too. He didn't have the 3rd or the 45th's, but maybe at one time he had those too. I don't know. But as your dad was, my dad's unit was also attached to all the above units while part of VI Corps and the 5th and 7th Armies.

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I was briefly in Morocco many yrs ago as part of a trip to Spain.

It was AWFUL! I couldn't get out of ther fast enough and finally understood

Dad's low opinion of that country. You had an immediate sense that human lives were cheap,

especially women.

 

I took out my Dad's pocket diary for '43 where he'd write notations in his small

handwriting. Here's some of his info:

 

2/22 left Ft Devens 5am arrived FT Dix 5pm - worked till 5am

3/5 left US

3/19 North Africa

3/24 went to Oran

3/25 company split up 25th went to sidi bel abbes

4/4 church sidi bel abbes

4/14 our 1st PX opened

5/16 moved to ???can't make this out - looks like A or C nt Temouchut for night

5/18 rabat

5/27-6/8 he was in the hospital

7/4 Rabat 1st armored and 36ID have big parade

7/7 casablanca

8/2 getting ready to move

8/3 part of company went by train

8/4 left Rabat

8/5 bivouac at La Senica(?)

8/6 arrive Port Aux Poules

8/23 ready to move again

8/26 Oran

8/29-8/31 staging area ? "ASSI-Ben OKBA" (don't know what that is)

9/5 left port at 1600 hours

9/7-9/8 at sea

9/9 boarded LST arrived on beach (looks like 0830hours). air attacks

9/10 moved to bivouac area Paestum. air attacks.

9/11 air attacks night & day

9/12 bivouac area same place

9/22 moved to Battipaglia. able to write home again.

9/27 Rain! first rain we've seen since last April

9/30 moved to Montello. Sleeping in a bldg

10/6 moving again to Avellino

10/12 moving to Maddaloni

10/21 1300 hrs moving out to ? Carrizzia?

10/27 1st PX opened up in Italy

10/29 Recd letters from home, 1st since I've been in Italy

11/1 moving out to Dragoni(?)

11/13 one killed 8 wounded from enemy shells (I assume this is in his MP Co)

11/19 moved to Caprilia(?)

11/25 Thanksgiving Day. Donuts! 2 boxes! (love this notation!)

12/20 Took 1st shower since I've been in Africa & Italy

12/25 Christmas Day. Good day here in Capriati

 

Then of course, like you, it was on to Anzio,the Volturno, Rome, DDAy

Southern France, the Vosges, the Rhine and home alive (thank God!) in March '45.

 

So very sorry to hear about your wife, Rocky. My brother was killed in a car accident

when he was 17 and I was 18 (we were "irish twins" 13 months apart), and

my Dad died in '82 when he was just 70. I was blessed to have my mother until 2004,

but now I'm the only one left. It's not like I've lost them & don't know where they are.

I know EXACTLY where they are, but I keep telling them: "Ok you guys, if I have to get

left behind, the least you can do is send extra love". They do & I'm sure it's the same for you.

We must have some other "missions" to perform & like the Army, we gotta take it whether

we like it or not.

 

Hey Rocky! I feel like a dope, but I can't figure out how to get to your page.

I need instruction.

 

all the very best!

 

Mary Ann (Frank Howard's proud daughter)

 

206thmpco:: The notes your dad wrote above, brings back memories.

Battipagla, Avelino, We wuz there. Volturno ditto. Taking a shower, ditto,ditto.

My page,log on to,, 6thcorpscombatengineers.com,, clickon, memoirs, click "other WW11 vets", scroll down to my name, Roque Riojas. click. I hope that's right. Maid Marion, Help!!

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Hi Marion! I bet your Dad had the other patches as well. I'm sure that my Dad

probably also had a T patch for the 36Id cuz he was with those guys as well.

 

I think it was because these were the outfits whose suffering they witnessed

and shared - that they kept those mementos.

 

When you think about it, their experiences consisted of constant separation, loneliness,

and fear. Not only were you separated from your own family & it was years before you could

hear their voices or see their faces - but you were also getting constantly removed from your

"buddies". Dad made notes in 1942 like: "the last of the boys from the 180th moved out of camp today". In N Africa he notes that several of the Lieutenants they'd known came

to visit them in one of their bivouacs & that meant alot. Most of his diary notes concern the sending or receiving of mail from home. Then so many of your pals were KIA. My father's

closest buddy was MP Cpl Bob Cunningham because they were together from Salerno to

the Rhine. I have a wonderful letter Bob sent to my Dad in May '45, I'll have to get it

& share it with you. My father's other constant companion who attached herself to Dad at Anzio was a mutt named "Sally". That's a great story for another time!

But - as awful as their experiences were & as great as it was to be home - it must've

been very surreal not to be able to see or share anything with most of the guys you

were with. All you had were medals, patches, and mementos in a box.

 

My Dad would be amazed by the net and all the info available. I think it would've been so wonderful if he could've "talked" with other vets.

 

mary ann

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Mary Ann: Quick note before I go off and make dinner... Were you able to see Rocky's page? There are numerous pages on the MAIN site under Memoirs, just as Rocky described.

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Found it! Rocky, what an honor & privilege to speak with you!

My Dad would've been so pleased.

As soon as I saw your picture with the President, I thought "Hey! I know

I've seen this picture of Rocky before!" Well, of course I did - I made a donation to get the

WWII memorial built ,so I get the newsletter and that's where I saw your photo.

I'd planned to attend the memorial dedication, but my Mom was not well then so I

wasn't able to go. I would dearly liked to have been there.

 

My father could've related to so much on your page. Those photos at Anzio & the K rations!

When he was drafed in '41, he was 6'2" 164lbs and the Army definately didn't help him

put on weight. By the time he got to Rome, and had his picture taken to send home, he

looked like a skeleton. What did my poor grandmother think when she got THAT photo

of her "boy". My father had a terrible sweet tooth, so that was what was so funny & sad about his Thanksgiving notation about the donuts. That's probably ALL they had for

Thanksgiving. The officers might've had turkey dinners, but I don't imagine the rest of

the fellows got any. Do you remember Thanksgiving '43, Rocky? Did you get any turkey?

 

On the "home front", his mother, sister, and ladies in his Wellesley Ma neighborhood

were busy sending him whatever they could and hoping it got there. I have a letter

my grandmother sent him while he was in Anzio that always gives me a chuckle.

She writes:"Francis, don't forget to send Mrs Hutt (a neighbor) a thank you note for

the cookies she sent ". He probably wanted to write "Hey Ma! We got A WAR

goin' on over here!", but I'd bet a million dollars that he wrote that note to Mrs Hutt.

 

He also could relate to what you said about Italy & being cold. Everybody was still

wearing the lightweight stuff they were issued for North Africa. In fact, I think

most of them were still wearing the same uniforms into much of the Rhineland campaign.

Eventually, some "genius" issued overcoats to the guys, but I don't believe they liked

those. You couldn't move around in them. I have a photo of Dad in Dec '45 and it looks

like he's wearing 3 pairs of socks, two pairs of gloves , scarves around his neck, and

whatever he could stuff into his regular army jacket. He looks COLD!

 

I loved your photos, Rocky. You are a handsome fellow! Clearly, your wife

Elizabeth had the kind of beauty that shines out from within as well as from without.

That's rare beauty that you can't get from a beauty spa. Your faith is strong, so

you KNOW that you'll see her again one day.

 

My Dad was smart like you & married Helen Cole. Here's a photo on their wedding day.

 

Dad's highest compliment ( and rarely given) was to say "He is a good man!"

I know he'd say that to YOU, Rocky!

 

It's a privilege!

 

Mary Ann

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Mary Ann: It's 1:10pm Wed. and I just read the above. I'm glad you found the page.

I was 23 just after I got discharged in Nov. '45. I read your e-mail three times and I don't

mind telling you, I had a nice cry for what you said about Elizabeth. Yes I will see her and

be with her some day. Yes your father was wearing 3 pairs of socks and two pairs of pants

(olive Drab) etc,,etc. I know, ME ALSO. Thanksgiving, we had just been relieved and went back just far enough from motar range. It so happened there was a road going up the hill

so our captain ordered a sixby and the mess sgt and kitchen crew brought up a kinda gas

stove, anyway we had coffee, and pancakes, no syrup, orange marmalade!! AND TO THIS

DAY I WILL NOT TOUCH ORANGE MARMALADE !! That' what we had for thanksgiving.

That's OK, did you read the story about the chicken?

I will cherish your above e-mail always. Now I have two top ladies to think about,

both of them start with an M. Thank you and God Bless. Rocky

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Mary Ann: It's 1:10pm Wed. and I just read the above. I'm glad you found the page.

I was 23 just after I got discharged in Nov. '45. I read your e-mail three times and I don't

mind telling you, I had a nice cry for what you said about Elizabeth. Yes I will see her and

be with her some day. Yes your father was wearing 3 pairs of socks and two pairs of pants

(olive Drab) etc,,etc. I know, ME ALSO. Thanksgiving, we had just been relieved and went back just far enough from motar range. It so happened there was a road going up the hill

so our captain ordered a sixby and the mess sgt and kitchen crew brought up a kinda gas

stove, anyway we had coffee, and pancakes, no syrup, orange marmalade!! AND TO THIS

DAY I WILL NOT TOUCH ORANGE MARMALADE !! That' what we had for thanksgiving.

That's OK, did you read the story about the chicken?

I will cherish your above e-mail always. Now I have two top ladies to think about,

both of them start with an M. Thank you and God Bless. Rocky

 

 

Mary Ann and Rocky....... :armata_PDT_37: Moose

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Mr.GSD - To answer your question about MI - it's a medical term for heart attack. My mother was a retired nurse so I tend to use some terms she used. - I don't remember when he started being ill with malaria but I do remember many times - him in bed for days at a time with chills so bad the the bed actually shook. Mom mentioned it was ongoing after the war but I didn't ask which war. He retired in 1963 and passed away in 1972 - shortly after his 50th birthday. He served in both WW2 and Korea.

tk

 

Thanks, PJO. That's "myocardial infarction" ... my family is chock-full of nurses, so I've been in more clinic backrooms and through more hospital back doors than a lot of ambulance drivers. I know that almost everybody in Korean War had to take chloroquine once a week... better than daily atabrine which you guys took in WW2 and turned yellow as a result. I want to get these details straight for the novel I'm working on, and I had not heard of regular use of atabrine in the mid-section of Europe (Benelux-Germany-NorthernFrance)... nor any malaria cases there. I'd like to know for sure. If anybody wants to e-mail me direct, I gave my e-address in an earlier post.

Fred

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Rocky,

 

I love the story about the chickens! I think I remember reading somewhere

about the guys at Anzio spending alot of time trying to catch some cows that

were on the loose. Good grief! i wonder how they were planning on cooking

THEM! Probably have to find a squad with someone who'd been a butcher

in civilian life. Pancakes & orange marmalade for Thanksgiving. Oh Boy! But

I betcha it tasted pretty darn good at the time. It wasn't bad enough that you guys

were shot at, shelled, cold and wet - but you had to be hungry all the time too.

My dad was thin all his life, but he ate 4 meals a day and ate every kind of candy, cookie,

and ice cream to boot. No wonder he was so skinny during the war, eating those

horrible K rations!

 

I'm gonna post some poems about Anzio that my Dad saved. You might get a chuckle

out of them.

 

I'm so glad you liked my email! Now don't you forget that the Good Lord had a strong

hold on you throughout Italy and He brought that good & beautiful Elizabeth into your

life, so he's certainly not gonna to let go of you now!

 

thank YOU & God bless YOU, Rocky!!!

 

Mary Ann

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Mary Ann,

I am a little slow, ask my adopted daughter, she e-mail with you a lot of times. I had great turkey dinners in the service. At Bainbridge Army Air Field we had turkey, potatoes, corn, pineqapple, rolls, apple pire, etc.. Now I wil;l tell yoiu as story that made me and your friend MARION together

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

MY WHOLE STORY

fficeffice" />>>

Art Morneweck and Belle Isle.

How we met – the love of my life She was 19,,,,I was 20

Early in 1943, I went on a double date with a friend and the Matthews sisters to Eastwood Amusement Park at Gratiot and 8 mile. It was a long drive from Detroit's west side. I was paired with Blanche, but her sister, Charlotte (Micky) was a great looker and I thought she was the one for me. We all had a good time together. It was more like a friend's outing than a date. Two nights later, Micky was on her way home from her job at G.M.C. She stopped at Simone's soda fountain shop where I was having a frozen Power House candy bar. We talked a while and I asked her to go for a ride. We drove to Belle Isle in my father’s 1940 Ford and one section was a parking that you faced the river and watch the boats go bye. There was no open parking space so we had to ride around the island. When you come to the bridge there was about 5 or 6 driving lanes that all turned right and takes you back off the island. Luckly I was in the 6th lane that took you over the bridge or you could drive straight and go around again. Something in my heart said go straight and I did. This time there was a parking space open. I parked and we had our first kiss. We watched the boats and then Micky said she had to go to the bath room. We left and stopped at first bath room and it was pad-locked, I looked at my watch and it was after mid-night, so was the second bat room locked.Going across the bridge Micky said she really had to go. I new if we turned left to go home we would not find a restaurant so I turned right and found a restaurant about two blocks away. I stopped and Micky used their bath room. About four months later we got engaged just before I left for Army Air Corps cadet training. I returned to Detroit to get married during a week long furlough.

Micky and I were apart for the next two years as I was sent to the Philippine Islands and occupation duty in Taegu, Korea. I returned home to her in July, 1946. We celebrated our 57th wedding anniversary May 15, 2001. Then Dec. 30, 2001 my Micky went to be with our Lord. Our daughters and son-in-law are Toni Ann Morneweck, Terry & Jack Ellis, and grandson Tim 16. We all live in same neighborhood in Novi. Micky's sister Blanche Rosendale, now lives in St. Clair.NOTE:BLANCE DIED Aug. 21, 2005.>>

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WW2 Marriages: A short “I do†and off to war

WW 2 marriages did not have tuxedos and long gowns but did have ever lasting love. As a cadet we finished our tour at Gettysburg College and was given one week furlough Friday May 12,1944. From "Old Dorm" I called my fiancee and asked if she would marry me. She said yes, I jumped on a bus to Harrisburg, bought a new cadet hat, jumped on train for Detroit. On the train the porter looked at me, with wings on my shoulder, wings on my new cap, and humming our song "You'll never know how much I miss you". The porter said "Sir we have a better seat in the car ahead of us." I arrived home Saturday morning and found out we needed some papers filled out but offices were closed. Luck was with me, my future father-in-law had friends downtown, so everything was copasetic. We were married Monday May 15,1944 at 7 PM. We went downtown to the Hotel Fort Shelby. Shortly after arriving there my wife's sister and our best man came with White Castle Hamburgers. We spent the rest of the week on cloud nine floating around visiting friends. Sunday May 20, 1944 I left my love (boy, is this hard to write) and did not see her for two years while I went to Philippine Islands and Taegu, Korea. My wife is with our Lord now, looking down here and I can still hear her saying "Roy you are going to make yourself sick". Name Roy is another story, my middle name is LeRoy.

 

May 20 I was back to Gettysburg College and we were shipped out to Maxwell Field, Alabama for Pre-flight. After pre-flight we went to Avon Park, Florida where we started flying the open cockpit Bi-wing PT-17 Stearman. Then to Lakeland Florida with same type of plane. Then to Cochran Field at Macon, Georgia flying the AT-6 Texan. January 1945 I was given check flight by a Captain and one by a Major. (I had my pilot’s license before joining the Air Corps.) The Major said I did OK but they had too many pilots and I was put in the Army Infantry. I went to Gainesville,Texas for infantry training. Finished training and went to New Jersey and then by train to Pittsburg, California and shipped out June 1, 1945 for the Philippine Islands.>>

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13-12-2006, 11:01 AM #2 (permalink)

Owen D

The Moose

 

 

 

 

 

Join Date: Dec 2005

Location: Under the stairs

Posts: 5,171 Nice story.

Welcome to the Forum.

Yesterday was 14 years since I met my wife. That involved my mates in a "found" wheelchair and two Police officers.

__________________

Universal carriers of 2nd Wiltshire Regiment pass through Trecastagni,Sicily, 9 August 1943 (NA 5752)

 

 

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Last edited by Owen D : 13-12-

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Hi "Roy"! I loved your story! Micky is definately with the Lord in Paradise and

keeping her eye on YOU! I know without a doubt that's true because my Dad

helped me take care of my mother - his beloved Helen.

 

Here's the story about how they met :

 

My father was a handsome fellow and he had alot of women chasing after him

before, during, and after the war. He was rather quiet & shy and when he came

home in '45, his buddies who were still in Germany wrote letters teasing him:

"Which one are you gonna marry Frank? or are you gonna keep 'em all dangling?".

 

Well, he didn't marry any of them. He had to wait till he met Helen.

When I asked my mother how they met, this is what she told me:

 

"Well, when I was teaching elementary school in Boston, I stopped to get

my car inspected & your father was at the same garage getting HIS car inspected

and he walked over & started talking to me."

 

(at this point I'd say: "C'mon MA!!! Dad just started talking to you???)

 

"Yes, and then he asked me out to the movies"

 

( Dad asked you OUT!!! And what did you say, Ma?)

 

"I said OK"

 

(MA!!! You said OK??? How could you do THAT? You'd just met him! )

 

"Things were different then, dear. Your father was a gentleman"

 

(OK so what happened after you went out?)

 

Two weeks later, he asked me to marry him.

 

(TWO WEEKS!!! Ma, what did you say?)

 

" I said: "Well Frank, I'll have to think about it."

 

(Then what Ma?)

 

"We picked out an engagement ring the next month on Dec 7th."

 

(Well Ma, you certainly didn't think about it very long. You meet this STRANGER

on oct 31st - Halloween for goodness sake! and then you get engaged on Pearl

Harbor Day. I'm surprised Dad didn't make you get married on the anniversary

of D-day!")

 

"No, but we did get married in June, 6 months later."

 

My parents were married June 28th 1952 and I was born

the following May. My dear Dad passed away 31 years to the day he met Helen

on Oct 31st 1982.

 

My mother was scheduled for emergency bypass surgery on Dad's birthday in 1996.

I remember praying: "Now look Daddy, I know you'd like to have Ma as a birthday present,

but FORGET IT! You can't have her yet. I need her down here with me!".

My mother came through surgery with flying colors that day & I was blessed to have her with me 8 more years. Frank waited along time to have his Helen back with him & I know

his joy is complete now.

 

Here's a photo they took in one of those old photo booths when they were on their

honeymoon. My father looks like the cat that swallowed the canary! He was with the woman

that he'd love for the rest of his life.

 

all the very best!!

 

Mary Ann

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