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j3rdinf

Wouldnt it be great IF

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Yes, wouldnt it be great IF a lot of the younger folks got their dads or granddads to

get their dads or grandads WW 2 stories on computer or taped. Too many neglect to find out the ww 2 history until it is too late. And then try to find out when it is too late.

Then they finally go looking for the details instead of getting the facts prior. Why is it so important now instead of back then ? This just drives me up the wall. Why do they wait till it is too late ? Wasnt it important back then? Or just only after their death?

Some wait till many years later and then want histories of them which could have been easily found by talking to them while alive. All they get this way of later checking is a

small bit of history, but no actual stories in first hand.

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Hey Joe,

 

I completely agree. I wish I could have talked to my uncle who landed on Omaha Beach with the U.S. 29th Infantry Division on D-Day before he passed in 1999. I probably should have but, we rarely saw one another and I actually didn't know of his passing until a couple of years ago. The only thing I can do now is look up his records if possible. I talked with my grandfather befor ehe passed in 2003 and learn a number of things. The only good thing is that even after his death I am thankful he retained all of his orders from his service time and so with what I don't know I can fill in the blanks that I never go tto sit down and discuss with him.

 

However, my uncle that served from Torch in 42' to Austria in 45' is another story. When it comes down to the non-combative aspects of his service time hes willing to talk about the war but, if I mention one thing of a combative nature he shuts down. He doesn't like to talk about that aspect as probably many don't. The only thing I have done from learning this is to tell him that when he is ready to talk about it to lift it off his shoulders and free himself of that burden that I am willing to listen and record it so that he is remembered for his sacrifice and bravery during that rough time in his life.

 

I like talking to those members of my family who have served in the military to learn as much as I can from them before they are gone. They have a story to tell and I'd like all of them to be appreciated for their service and sacrifice.

 

I simply wish like you Joe that the younger generation(that will GOD FORBID take over the responsibility of our great country someday) will take the time to learn about their families history and most importantly those who served in the line of duty overseas in the numerous conflicts our country has been involved with from the Revolutionary War right up to todays modern ongoing conflict on the War on Terror.

 

Regards,

MARNE

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I agree whole-heartedly. I get emails from people who visit my website. Most of them write to say they are researching their father's war record after he has gone. Some can't tell you what his unit was or even where in Europe he served. They have a name and maybe some story about visiting Rome.

I try very hard to help anyone learn as much about their father's war time service. If they can provide info as to what infantry company, that can help them learn something about their Dad's unit. If they can provide a date he was wounded, then I can give details as to where his unit was on that date.

But it is much easier to learn details while they are still with us. Even if it seems to be a very insignificant detail. Also, you will be surprised; it seems that if you do your homework first, then they seem more likely to answer your questions. I know my Dad would not talk much about his experiences to just anyone. But if he knew the person had been there or understood what went on, then he would freely talk.

 

Steve

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Hi Joe; glad you got my new e-m, add. I'll tell you what's sad, I went to my car dealership to have some work done and there was a fellow there about his late forties, and he saw my cap,(34th Inf. Divn.) WW II, We talked a bit and then I asked hime about his father. He said that he passed away in '89 but that he DIDN'T know anything except that he drove a truck, in Italy so I just didn't say anymore, but I did say it was a shame that a lot of young people don't know or care about what happened when you and I did our thing. I have six children and everyone knows what they are supposed to know about me. And I know you and Jim are the same way. I sure get p--------d off when I ask a young person about WW II and just get a blank look back. Ketch me later Joe.. Hey Jim, jump in !!!! Roque :pdt34:

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A lot of truth in these replies. Very rarely do I go into details of combat conditions to

anyone but another of the same type. Even on here. However the day to day happenings should be brought forth as rarely do the people realize the usual conditions

we lived, and the things we now believe interesting and should be brought up to give some idea of the usual day to day life we led and conditions for front line troops. We are not hiding our "bad times in combat". But usually try to forget them or go over them sparingly to others not in the same "job" we were in or not in service. But, get a few of "us" together and the stories do fly right and left. But only usually to this select

few. Otherwise we talk genarilities about the war, rations, clothing, equiptment and the likes and houmorous things. Any WW 2 G.I.s should keep all papers and a written history for their offsprings so they have a good idea of what and where they served.

All is a important part of history and should not be kept from them. Naturally, some things should be left untold.

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Guest chucktoo1926

Oh how I hear you.I have tried, but to little or no avail. When war broke out ,My oldest brother Don was drafted. Next, JR (only family were allowed to call him that)inlisted in the Marine "Wake Island Unit". Ken enlisted in the Naval Air Corps, and me in the Army Air Corps. Thanks be to GOD, we all returned home. Jr. was wounded on Bouganville. To this day I have been unable to find out anything more than that. Two sons and a daughter, and that's it.

 

His eldest son, Donnie, That's all we knew him by, did tell me of an incident years later when he and his dad were out fishing in Frisco bay. Donnie had hooked onto a big one. After fighting for a while he got him up to the boat and asked his dad to get the net deady. when Donnie expected his dad to net him, it appeared that it was a baby shark, and his dad cut the line. Donnie was so mad. He wanted it as a trophy. he never forgave him for cutting the line.

 

It wasn't till some time later that he told of the incident to a fellow friend and MARINE buddy of his dad. This buddy told him of an assault landing on an island , where his dad and another marine were shuttling troops to the beach and bringing wounded back to the ship. this went on all day. toward evening, Jr said their landing craft was bumping into bodies on the way to the beach. By that time he said the water was red and then the sharks came in. Donnie then knew why his dad cut the line.

 

I guess the fault could lie with me for not prodding, but how far do you go before you waken things they would rather let sleep. He died a few years after the war, from wounds I believe were related. Being 2500 mile away, I saw him 3 times till his final calling. I was just beginning high school when we saw him off at Union Station. Going off to avenge the men on Wake. I never got to know him. Maybe never will.

 

chucktoo

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