Jump to content
Sgtleo

The Medic

Recommended Posts

:banghead::banghead:

 

This is one thing that always bothered me. When they kept telling the Medics(God Bless Them) that they weren't Combat Soldiers or were in Combat! Hello There!

 

 

CombatPay.jpg

 

Sgtleo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, mais qui! Saw a show the other day depicting a medic. One guy says to him, "Hey, what do you have to worry about? You ain't been in combat?" Oh mon Dieu!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While reading through the General Orders of 85th Division, I found a Silver Star awared posthomously to a medic who volunteered to go retrieve some wounded under fire. Even though he crawled 100 yards to avoid gunfire, he was shot in the head by a sniper. I could post the info, but this is supposed to be a Humor thread.

 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ya, here's to our medics. God love 'em and bless 'em all. What HAVEN'T they seen or been through? :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Too many times did I hear the cry "MEDIC' , and it was always answered. Never could figure out why the combat medics badge was so slow in being finally authorized as a award..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are stupid rules and stupid rules. This was a stupid rule. These guys had no choice and were always on the front lines. They were wherever they were needed. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of years ago, I was in touch with Richard Bowman who was a Combat Medic in the 704th TD Bn - 4th Armored Division.

He still had his original Medic helmet ...... with a bullet hole in the top!

 

Apparently, he was tending to some wounded GIS when he got hit by a sniper.

Luckily for him the bullet only grazed his skull.

He got a Purple Heart for it and kept his helmet as one would keep a rabbit's foot for luck.

 

RichardBowman-souvenirs1.jpg

Richard with his helmet and uniform.

Rest in peace, my friend.

 

Erwin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gee, he even fit into his old uniform too. Yes, rest in peace and once again, God bless our medics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of guys owe their lives to the courage of these men.

I don't know if you remember or saw the episode on Bastogne in the series "Band of Brothers"? You know where they focuss on the Medic?

 

Well, to me it is a fitting tribute to the Combat Medic.

 

Erwin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The most amazing story I have ever heard about a medic/corpsman was that of Desmond Doss. One of two conscientious objector to earn the Medal of Honor. I first heard of him on an Okinawa battle sites tour I took while there for a quick trip with the reserves. His citation says it all:

 

DOSS, DESMOND T.

 

Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, Medical Detachment, 307th Infantry, 77th Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Urasoe Mura, Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 29 April-21 May 1945. Entered service at: Lynchburg, Va. Birth: Lynchburg, Va. G.O. No.: 97, 1 November 1945. Citation: He was a company aid man when the 1st Battalion assaulted a jagged escarpment 400 feet high As our troops gained the summit, a heavy concentration of artillery, mortar and machinegun fire crashed into them, inflicting approximately 75 casualties and driving the others back. Pfc. Doss refused to seek cover and remained in the fire-swept area with the many stricken, carrying them 1 by 1 to the edge of the escarpment and there lowering them on a rope-supported litter down the face of a cliff to friendly hands. On 2 May, he exposed himself to heavy rifle and mortar fire in rescuing a wounded man 200 yards forward of the lines on the same escarpment; and 2 days later he treated 4 men who had been cut down while assaulting a strongly defended cave, advancing through a shower of grenades to within 8 yards of enemy forces in a cave's mouth, where he dressed his comrades' wounds before making 4 separate trips under fire to evacuate them to safety. On 5 May, he unhesitatingly braved enemy shelling and small arms fire to assist an artillery officer. He applied bandages, moved his patient to a spot that offered protection from small arms fire and, while artillery and mortar shells fell close by, painstakingly administered plasma. Later that day, when an American was severely wounded by fire from a cave, Pfc. Doss crawled to him where he had fallen 25 feet from the enemy position, rendered aid, and carried him 100 yards to safety while continually exposed to enemy fire. On 21 May, in a night attack on high ground near Shuri, he remained in exposed territory while the rest of his company took cover, fearlessly risking the chance that he would be mistaken for an infiltrating Japanese and giving aid to the injured until he was himself seriously wounded in the legs by the explosion of a grenade. Rather than call another aid man from cover, he cared for his own injuries and waited 5 hours before litter bearers reached him and started carrying him to cover. The trio was caught in an enemy tank attack and Pfc. Doss, seeing a more critically wounded man nearby, crawled off the litter; and directed the bearers to give their first attention to the other man. Awaiting the litter bearers' return, he was again struck, this time suffering a compound fracture of 1 arm. With magnificent fortitude he bound a rifle stock to his shattered arm as a splint and then crawled 300 yards over rough terrain to the aid station. Through his outstanding bravery and unflinching determination in the face of desperately dangerous conditions Pfc. Doss saved the lives of many soldiers. His name became a symbol throughout the 77th Infantry Division for outstanding gallantry far above and beyond the call of duty.

 

Wow. Thank God for these men. The Marine Corps farms out two of its inner functions to the Navy: Chaplains and medical, and we could no where without either. The Chaps save our souls and the corpsman save us from the enemy (in war) and from ourselves (every other situation)!

Todd O.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:clappin2::clappin2:

 

CaptO:-

 

Thanks for a great account of a great soldier and human being.

 

What "frosted" the BTDTs was this type of situation where a

clerk is telling the Medic he is NOT a Combat Soldier but only

a Medic. Most BTDTs loved the Medics unashamedly!!!!

Oh by the way notice the Clerk is wearing his CIB

 

CombatPay.jpg

 

Sgtleo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Too far forward not to wear a tie and back far enough not to have to salute.

I saw the CIB . Roque BTDT seen it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:rolleyes::rolleyes:

 

Rocky:-

 

We had a little different saying - "Too far forward to wear a

tie and way too far back to get shot"!!

 

CaptO:-

 

Reading what you said above about the Navy Corpsmen. I

had a boyhood friend who was a Corpsman 1st/c and I could

never get over his Marine Uniform with the Navy Crow on his arm.

 

I have a good Marine story about a very Famous Marine who was

a member of Carlson's Raiders and stayed in after WWII and rose

to the rank of a Bird Col. in the Reserve.

 

Sgtleo :banghead:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are several good sites on the net concerning WWII medics.

 

The WWI Combat Medic

 

From the same site:

Medical Detachment Attached To Infantry Regiment

 

MEDAL of HONOR Citations – MEDICAL PERSONNEL

 

The Combat Medical Badge

Brief History: the Medical Badge was finally introduced March 3, 1945 for medical personnel who served with the Medical Detachments during WW2 . Let’s have a brief history of this insignia . The introduction of both E.I.B. (Expert Infantryman Badge) and C.I.B. (Combat Infantryman Badge) in November 1943 created an administrative problem and caused wide concern about medical personnel and Infantrymen . Although medical personnel, regularly attached to an Infantry unit were running considerable hazards when carrying out their duty, they were NOT entitled to the C.I.B. ! (though some Commanders did obtain CIBs for the combat medics) Army Regulations strictly forbade granting combat awards, since this was against the Geneva Convention and the non-combatant (i.e. neutral) status of medical personnel ! In fall of 1944, the War Department once more stressed that it was forbidden to grant EIBs and CIBs to medical personnel and Chaplains ! This was because a lot of Infantrymen (acknowledging the risk and courage of combat medics, attached to Infantry units) complained it was unfair to treat aidmen this way, and also some people were thoroughly frustrated they could not earn the extra $ 10.00/month of combat pay (which went with the CIB award) . Hence the introduction by the Surgeon General’s Office of a special badge to honor medical personnel ! The design was adopted 3 March 1945, and the official uniform regulations appeared on April 18, 1945 (C-3 of AR 600-35) .

 

 

 

 

 

Description: The Medical Badge (AG 421/3 Mar 45) "A STRETCHER PLACED HORIZONTALLY BEHIND A CADUCEUS WITH THE CROSS OF THE GENEVA CONVENTION AT THE JUNCTION OF THE WINGS, ALL ENCLOSED BY AN ELLIPTICAL OAK WREATH 1-IN IN HEIGHT AND 1 ½ -IN IN WIDTH, OF OXIDIZED SILVER" . statement: The War Department has authorized wear of a Medic’s Badge for personnel who served with the Medical Detachments of Infantry Regiments or smaller units, since the beginning of the War . The subsequent Bill of Congress will give those people an extra $ 10.00-a-month pay as provided for combat infantrymen . Medics up to and including rank of Captain are eligible, as well as Regimental Surgeons The Medical Badge shall be worn above decorations and/or ribbons, over the left breast pocket of the uniform coat or jacket . SOURCE:AR 600-35 C 3, Army Regulations, Changes No. 3, War Department, Washington 25, D.C., 18 April 1945 (Listing of Changes to AR 600-5, 31 March 1944, together with other modifications governing the use of prescribed service uniforms)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few more Combat Medic links:

 

http://www.combatmedic.org/

 

Interview: Natalia Peshkova: A Soviet WWII Medic

 

One of today`s Combat Medics -o-

There will be one military hero at the 2008 Miss America Pageant in January.

 

Miss Utah Jill Stevens Awarded Combat Medic Badge

 

Books about Doctors, Nurses, and Medicine in WWII

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×