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parker

Remagen-Ludendorf Bridge March 17, 1945

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I have always been a history buff and am especially interested in the Great Depression and WW 11. I knew my Uncle George was killed in the war and from what Mom said he was killed on some bridge in Germany. You see I now know that my Uncle was a proud member of the 341st. Engineers General Sv Regt. Company A and helped build the AlCan highway. Once that project was finished he got to come home on leave before undergoing more training and being sent on to England. He came ashore in France at Normandy a couple of weeks after D-Day and was traped in the Battle of the Bulge for a time. At the time of his death he was helping make repairs to the Ludendorf Bridge at Remagen on March 17, 1945 when the bridge fell into the Rhine. His full name is was George N. Chandler from Texas he was a Tec 5 and his service no. was 38079495. His body is burried in Holland.

 

Just before Christmas last year I made contact with Mr. and Mrs Oberbeck. Mr. Oberbeck was a Captain and my Uncle George's Company Commander from Alaska to Germany. All I can say is wow. Mr. Oberbeck is 90 years young and as sharp as a tack. He and his wife are just great people and I have enjoyed our converstations.

 

If anyone has any information or would just like to chat I would be happy to hear or to help in any way.

 

Thanks for your time,

 

Parker

 

 

 

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This is what I found on the ABMC website about your uncle.

 

George N. Chandler

Technician Fifth Class, U.S. Army

Service # 38079495

341st Engineer General Service Regiment

Entered the Service from: Texas

Died: 17-Mar-45

Buried at: Plot K Row 19 Grave 6

Netherlands American Cemetery

Margraten, Netherlands

Awards: Bronze Star, Purple Heart

 

I am living about 10 kilometers away from the American cemetery. I visit it regularly and when I go again I will make a picture of his grave if you want and I will send it to you by e-mail.

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Fantastic and a warm welcome to you Parker. Always nice to get to know something about another fantastic engineer.

 

I will let you know if I can find out anything else too.

 

Frank, thanks for your input too. :pdt34:

 

PS. Am going to move this post to the WWII Engineers section.

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I found several references to the unit in my engineering book. I am going to scan them this afternoon and try and get them posted later today for ya! B)

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Here we go. This is a 6 page PDF file. Hope you enjoy it! :pdt34:

341st_General_Service_Regiment.pdf

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Try this man. I don't know if this is still current, but it's worth a try!

 

341st Engr's, Co 'D'

 

Mr. George W Hine

101 Mitsy Ln

Brownwood, TX 76802-2145

 

915-646-0045

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Also try contacting NARA in College Park, Maryland. They have after-action reports etc. Let me know if you need any help with it.

 

http://www.archives.gov/dc-metro/college-p...park/index.html

 

 

Also contact the Army Corps of Engineers. Tell Michael Brodhead that I sent you. He's a really great man and the head of the history department.

 

http://www.hq.usace.army.mil/history/contact_us.htm

 

You may also want to contact my friend, Richard at WWII Connections.

 

http://www.ww2connections.com/pages/1/index.htm

 

This should be enough to get you off to a great start. :pdt34:

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Guest chucktoo1926   
Guest chucktoo1926

Well Parker; how do you lik them apples. Bet you didn't expect this kind of reception to your first post. Just goes to show you the kind of site Marion has. Your'e going to :heartpump: Marion as all of us do. And what can be said of those wonderful people in the Netherlands, keeping up the gravesites of fallen Americans.

 

Stick around pal; we're like moss, we'll gro on you.

 

WELCOME, :drinkin:

chucktoo

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Frank Gubbels; YOU DESERVE A SALUTE FROM THIS DOGFACE FOR WHAT

YOU DO AND SO CLOSE TO THE CEMENTARY. AGAIN SALUTE.

Roque J.Riojas, in behalf of the 34th. Divn. Assoc.

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Guest chucktoo1926   
Guest chucktoo1926

Hi Parker; thanks for your reply.

 

Didn't take you long to find out about Marion and her site. You are going to see what a dynamo Mare is. For a shrimp she packs quite a whollup. I'm convinced she came down from a distant planet. If you can name me ONE other site where the moderator mixes in with the troops, as she does, let me know. You will see what I mean in short order. Papa Art & I have met her, and as you said in your mail to me"This woman IS real".

 

Your sentiment about those wonderful people OVER THERE in the Netherlands is not misplaced. They have been taking care of Papa Art's brother Robert's grave all these years. I too have wondered if we would do the same. Strange, isn't it, how we Americans find it difficult to help our neighbor across the street, but will go over seas and spill our blood for strangers who can't protect themselves, and then maligned by others for doing it. enough!

 

As for your other question; I am somewhat a vet. I enlisted in the AIR CORPS. was shifted into radio school when the need for air crews subsided. Went on to airborne radar and then when the war ended, was loaned out to the Signal Corps for shipboard radar. Who in turn loaned us to the Transportation Corps, where we went out as three man radar crews on troop ships bringing back GI's for separation, and on one occaision a large groop of Warbrides. Funny thing when it came time for our separation. Seeing as we had patches for Air Corps, Signal core, and Transportation Corps, we were given our choice of which branch we would like to be separated from.

 

I do a lot of gabbing on "shooting the breeze" and other Misc. sites. I leave the War sites to the ones who did the job.

 

Once again, I wish to welcome you. You will find a lot of friends here

chucktoo

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Frank Gubbels; YOU DESERVE A SALUTE FROM THIS DOGFACE FOR WHAT

YOU DO AND SO CLOSE TO THE CEMENTARY. AGAIN SALUTE.

Roque J.Riojas, in behalf of the 34th. Divn. Assoc.

Thank you very much for your comment. Makes me feel good.

 

Regards,

 

Frank

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I put Howard Parthum in touch with Larry via email. Here's what Howard had to contribute...

 

Hi Larry.
I am going to also copy this to Marion Chard until I figure out how to use the site. I am happy to share what I have. I know my grandfather would have been happy to know someone had interest in his stories.
Yesterday being Veteran's day I played around searching for gramp's name (Col. Edward H. Coe). That led me to this book where Colonel Coe wrote an introduction.- The history of the 341st Engineer Regiment, July 29, 1943-March 22, 1946 I assume you all have seen it, but if not it surely would be of interest. From there I looked around for the 341st which led me to your posting about your uncle.

When I found your post about your uncle being killed on a bridge over the Rhine it reminded me of a piece in his memoirs he had written about that time. I am pretty sure he was talking about the same bridge anyway. I have scanned those particular pages and am attaching them here for now. I talked to my uncle today and I understand he has copied the Memories into a .pdf file which he hopes to send me but I will just go ahead and scan these particular pages for the moment to get them to you right away.

I will try and get you soon the other pages which deal with Camp Sutton, England, France, Belgium, The Bulge, Germany, Remagen, East of the Rhine, and back to Marseille. (1943-1945). Colonel Coe also wrote about his service in Japan with "The Big 9" if anyone has interest (1949-1952)

Cordially,

Howard

 

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I placed the link on the History Page on the main site too. Great stuff! :pdt12:

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Oh here's the excerpt he was talking about within his letter...

From EHC Memories - excerpt regarding bridge.pdf

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Hi Marion and everyone. Thank you for making this site available, and thanks for uploading that excerpt from my grandfather's writings. I have since been able to get the other pages turned into a .pdf. They begin with his tour at Ft. Belvoir and conclude with his return stateside after Europe. The attached file below includes the pages Marion uploaded for me above, PLUS some more of the history. Please enjoy! I know Col Coe would have enjoyed swapping stories with you.
~Howard Parthum

Memories 15- 27 B.pdf

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I talk to Johnny regularly. In fact, we exchanged emails this morning.

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I have never visited this topic before, and feel so privileged and, of course, very sad, to actually know the name of one of the Heroes that perished on the Remagen Bridge!

 

What a story and Remagen turned out to be part of my Dad's story too.

 

Thank you all for sharing these wonderful stories and pieces of real history!

 

Jean Alice

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Howard, I sent Johnny an email, explaining that you would be contacting him.

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Jean Jacobson, may I ask who your father is? I am new to this site and am trying to get caught up. What was his connection to the bridge if you do not mind sharing it?

Marion, thank you I will try and get an email out to him tonight. I have enjoyed reading his accounts.

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Hello Hape4me!

 

My Dad is Jean Henry Dasburg. Sadly he died in 2008 and he never got to know (how the story ended) what happened to all of the Prisoners (so many non ambulatory) at the Siegburg Lazarett - Stalag 6 G.

 

He escaped with another gentleman on March 15th, 1945 and eventually made it to the Allied lines on March 21st. Dad's intent was to tell the Allied's to not bomb Siegburg (a constant target) and the Abbey where so many American wounded men were being held and medically treated as best they could be with so little resources available.

 

Because of the damage done by a bomb, around March 6th, the barbed wire around the Abbey had been nearly flattened in some places, and knowing the Americans were getting closer - he took his chances.

 

He appears to have been debriefed in or near Remagen. And there is a photo of him being served some food by a member of the 78th Division. My research continues - and thanks to the crossing of the Bridge at Remagen the Allieds were able to get closer!

 

This is a Fantastic site! And so much of my Dad's story has come together because of this site! I am eternally grateful!

 

Jean Alice

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What an experience this has been for me. Marion is the best as we all know and she came through again for me. Without her web site I would have given up on learning anything about my Uncle several years ago. Lets face it. The 341st Engineer General Service Regiment didn't get any headlines either then or now. In fact I thought I had learned all that I could when Howard was kind enough to share his Col. Coe's memoirs with me and us. That started it and then out of the blue I receive about 60 pages or so from Nick Pipers (the man who adopted my Uncles grave). Not sure why the Army sent them to him but he was kind enough to send them on to me. These documents filled in all the remaining holes in my research. So thank you one and all for everything.

:bluejumper:

Parker

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Be sure to check out his uncle's page here: http://www.6thcorpscombatengineers.com/GeorgeChandler.htm

 

And Larry, thank you again for your kind words. I sure appreciate hearing that.

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I do need to clear up one detail. Uncle George was never a part of the 7th Infantry. The patch he is wearing in the picture is what got all this started. This is the story: My Mom was still alive and I was telling her that I was stumped by the patch. Mom started laughing and said that George and his friend (also a Engineer) had gone to town while he was home on leave and decided to have their picture taken. My Uncle thought his friends uniform jacket looked better then his and so used his friends jacket for the picture. I had wasted a lot of time trying to figure this out and she thought it was very funny. You would have to have known my Mom to fully understand but she got a kick out of it.

 

Parker

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