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Cadetat6

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About Cadetat6

  • Rank
    deceased
  • Birthday October 9

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    yes

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    http://www.6thcorpscombatengineers.com/ArtMorneweck.htm
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  • Location
    Novi, Michigan
  • Interests
    WW2, Sports
  1. Cadetat6

    Info Please - select a year

    Chuck too, to your question " too bad heros have to get old". Jimminy cricxket, I am not old, mabe tomorrow but not today, copasetic cadetat6
  2. Al don't worry about our 5 foot (standing on a box ) dynamo. NO BRIDGE TOO FAR ,will soon be number one in our hit p[arade. There goes my computer, ity cannot spell . papa
  3. Cadetat6

    TRUE

    GREAT TRUTHS THAT LITTLE CHILDREN HAVE LEARNED: 1) No matter how hard you try, you can't baptize cats. 2) When your Mom is mad at your Dad, don't let her brush your hair. 3) If your sister hits you, don't hit her back. They always catch the second person. 4) Never ask your 3-year old brother to hold a tomato. 5) You can't trust dogs to watch your food. 6) Don't sneeze when someone is cutting your hair. 7) Never hold a Dust-Buster and a cat at the same time. 8) You can't hide a piece of broccoli in a glass of milk. 9) Don't wear polka-dot underwear under white shorts. 10) The best place to be when you're sad is Grandpa's lap. GREAT TRUTHS THAT ADULTS HAVE LEARNED: 1) Raising teenagers is like nailing Jell-O to a tree. 2) Wrinkles don't hurt. 3) Families are like fudge...mostly sweet, with a few nuts. 4) Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground. 5) Laughing is good exercise. It's like jogging on the inside. 6) Middle age is when you choose your cereal for the fiber, not the toy. GREAT TRUTHS ABOUT GROWING OLD 1) Growing up is mandatory; growing old is optional. 2) Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get. 3) When you fall down, you wonder what else you can do while you're down there. 4) You're getting old when you get the same sensation from a rocking chair that you once got from a roller coaster. 5) It's frustrating when you know all the answers but nobody bothers to ask you the questions. 6) Time may be a great healer, but it's a lousy beautician. 7) Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
  4. Kilroy was here--there -- and every ware. 1945 September I was with advance occupation force. We releaved the Japanese soldiers at Taegu,Korea and it wasv raining. I climb under the tarp and it was the ammunition dump. I wrote "kilroy was here" and left. My middel name is Le roy. papa Art
  5. Cadetat6

    Shipping out

    This is the liberty ship I took to Leyte in the Phillipines, on way to Korea Marion's note: Hi Papa. I moved this from the Shooting the Breeze Section. That is just for general discussion, not war related items. I also made the photo much smaller. We have to keep the photo sizes relatively small. I request that everyone only uploads files 800 X 600 or smaller. This keeps my server fees down. Thanks!
  6. Cadetat6

    all is well

    Max sleeps most of the day, but gets up if wind moves the door
  7. Cadetat6

    FLYING P-38

    The P-38 needed a good pilot to fly it. Lindberg traveled the Pacific Ocean training the pilots to come back from a mission with gas still in the tank. They should never fly under 50 feet over water Air_Corp__AT_6_Air_Plane.doc
  8. Cadetat6

    WW1

    Capt. Frederick Banting, Canada: Surgeon, Canadian Army Medical Corps; wounded in action and decorated for heroism; co-discoverer of insulin; Nobel Prize 1923; killed in plane crash en route to service in WWII. The most memorable religious event of World War I occurred in Portugal--by then a belligerent--in 1917. Three children, Lucia Santos and her cousins Jacinta and Francisco Marto reported visions of the Virgin Mary near the town of Fatima. They said the visions happened on the 13th of each month between May and October. Mary was said to have left the children three secrets, the last of which [it is claimed] involved the assassination attempt on Pope John Paul II. The two cousins died of the Spanish Influenza in 1919 and Lucia lived on as a nun until 2005.
  9. Who Shot Down Yamamoto? Having been a participant in the Yamamoto mission, I read your article with great interest and found it to be very accurate except in one small detail: the 30-foot altitude and a major disagreement with its conclusion about [1st Lt.] Rex Barber and [Capt.] Tom Lanphier, who were both very good friends of mine ["Magic and Lightning," March, p. 62 http://www.afa.org/magazine/March2006/0306yamamoto.asp]. In the 13th Fighter Command report "Subject: Fighter Interception," it stated we flew at 30 feet and, in another place, we flew 10 to 30 feet above the water. In truth, John Mitchell briefed us to maintain 50 feet of altitude, which I and my team mates did all the way to Bougainville. Ten to 30 feet above the ocean is ridiculous in that if one engine quits, only the most skillful of pilots could prevent crashing into the ocean before they could safely convert to single engine flying. After Japanese records revealed that only two Betty bombers were shot down, not three, and no Zeros were shot down, Tom wrote an unpublished book (I have a copy) in which he claimed that only he should have full credit for shooting down Yamamoto's plane. Up to that time, Rex was willing to accept half credit, but after Tom let Rex and [Maj.] John Mitchell read it, they were in strong disagreement from then on. My personal interest started the day after the mission when I asked Tom about the Betty bomber he said he had shot down. He told me that after he turned into the three Zeros on the right side of Yamamoto's plane (which in my mind was fabulous in that it gave Rex an unimpeded path to Yamamoto's plane), he shot at the oncoming Zeros and, as they passed, he made a 180-degree turn after which he saw a Betty bomber at about 90 degrees to him and at some distance. He fired his guns using lead, and the Betty's right wing came off and the Betty rapidly descended to a crash. In 1988, the Nimitz Foundation at Fredricksburg, Tex., held its first symposium with its subject "The Yamamoto Mission." There were seven of us from the mission, plus Yanagua, the only survivor of the six Japanese Zero pilots. Through an interpreter, he told the audience that no Zeros were shot down, five landing at Kahili and one at Ballalae, and then at about two o'clock the six took off, joined up, and flew back to Rabaul. After the talks, through an interpreter, he told me he was the only one still living because, in a fight with an F6F, he had his right hand hit, which had to be amputated and he could not fly any more. The other five were killed in combat later on. When he saw a P-38 about to attack Yamamoto's airplane (because they had had their radios removed to lighten the plane), he was unable to warn Yamamoto's pilot. He flew ahead and fired his guns in the hope that his tracers would warn the pilot, but to no avail. After the Betty was fired at, Yanagua stated it crashed after 20 to 30 seconds. (I have a copy of his sworn statement as to this fact.) Another book has a part of Admiral Ugaki's diary in which he said he saw the attack and that after Yamamoto's plane was hit, it took only 20 seconds before it hit the ground. There is no way that the P-38G models that we flew with no aileron boost could make a 180-degree turn and fly to the fray in the cited 20 to 30 seconds. However, in Tom's unpublished book, he states that he followed Yamamoto's Betty bomber to near its crash site. [He] gave a very accurate description of the scene, and also how he had shot down Yamamoto's plane for the second time (of course, not mentioned by him was that it was the second time), which brings up the question: Should future review boards give him credit for shooting down one-and-a-half bombers? Without question, that would be ridiculous. It is my strong opinion that Tom never fired one round at any Betty bomber. Also, after Yanagua and Admiral Ugaki confirmed they had seen a P-38 shoot down Yamamoto's plane and said so, only Rex should be credited with this victory because their statements and Rex's are practically identical. Maitland, Florida
  10. Cadetat6

    HERE COMES THE JUDGE

    I was Air Corp. Cadet 1943, and joined Air Corps. Forum. When I was too busy to go , I finally left the forum. A few months ago I tried to go back to the forum, I had lost my password so they gave me another. After weeks, off and on, I kept trying, now I see why SNAFU is the word for Air Forces Forum. They kept saying “your password does not match. OK, so lets get another way to do it. I will join again , so I register my login, e-mail, signature, password, and whatever they asked for.Then the computer said, “your log in or e-mail has been chosen, please try again, click GO BACK†Fore 10 minutes I kept going back, and know I give up. Let some younger pilot find out why they are top snafu’s. During the time I spent with snafu someone posted that he was looking for someone who had basic training at Miami Beach, Florida. His father went there for his basic , but never talks about his training. Many replyed except they did not know about Miami Beach. Do I know? Yes I spent monthes at Miami Beach for Basic Training and HEMORRHOIDS OPERATION CADETAT6 Ar
  11. Cadetat6

    You be the judge

    You be the judge!! So you know where I am coming from 1942 received my pilot license 1943 enlisted in Army air corp. Basic Training—Miami Beach, Florida Aug. 02, 1943 to Dec. 03, 1943 Includes hemorrhoids operation And TENT CITY.,Florida. I have Pictures and diary of all this. Now for my story and ArmyAir Forces.com.. I use to post and had no problem with this forum. Then they said ,you have to join and pay dues to be able to post. That is ok, I went to other forums. I have worked with Library of Concgress , Korean forums, three high school students e-mail one another from Texas, W. Virginia, and Holland .and a Holland school teacher who adopted my younger brother grave and put flowers on it, starting in 1945 at Margraten ( Holland). He was 19, wounded at Bastogne K.I.A. crossing Rhine River. I read a post in Army Air Force Forum that said.â€Need information on what AAF Basic Training was like.I know tjat it was conducted at Miami Beach Florida and that trainees were billeted in civillan hotels. But aside from then learning how to march,salute,wear the uniform and bphysical fitness training, what other training was conducted†John W. Wingfield, Jr. SON OF A 416TH Sqdn Gunner Now I could tell someone about things like the N.Y. bookie whom always won at card games but had me keep his money in a money belt I had. It was only a few bucks. I tried to get to John but gave up when all Army Air Force would say ,after I had entered my login, and password,â€Your login or e-mail has been chosen, please try again “ Cadetat6 Art <papa@twmi.rr.com>
  12. To:Army Air Force,com I have tried to locate John W. Wingfield, Jr. who posts to your web, trying for info on his father. I could not find any to help. His father was 416th Sqdn Gunner. Herv is the info John needs. Post #1 General Group: General Posts: 6240 Joined: 30-March 02 From: San Francisco Member No.: 15 Posted by: cadetat6 Jul 28 2003 2:21 PM Army Air Corps: When the Army Air Force recruited the college students in 1942 as Aviation Cadets from the colleges and universities across the land, then they told the students that they were needed as officers in the rapidly expanding Army Air Force and would become pilots, navigators, or bombardiers. Furthermore, those that did not choose to fly and had two years of college would become an Aviation Cadet Ground Crew and commissioned in armaments, communication, meteorology, photography, or engineering. But, when the AAF discovered at the end of 1943 that their over zealous recruiting and over estimation of loss rate had created a large surplus of pilots, they ignored all of the promises made to the college students and began transferring them to technical schools. This did not create a pleasant situation for the schools or the ex-cadets. ~~~ Posted by: cadetat6 Jul 28 3002 10:24 AM Enlisted Reserve Corps, Boot Camp: AIR CADET. 1942 I received my civilian pilots license from Hartung Airport at Gratiot and 10-½ mile. 1943 I enlisted in the Army Air Corps. ERC (enlisted reserve Corps). I was sent to Miami Beach, Florida for basic training. We stayed in Netherlands Hotel on Ocean Drive across from the Atlantic Ocean. The Air Corps took over about 300 hotels on south Miami Beach. The first morning the sergeant walked on all the floors blowing whistle and telling every one to fall out in front of the hotel in 4 lines. We were marched (walked) to the Tide (green latrine) hotel for breakfast. As we lined up to go in, 2 kids walked along selling orange juice, pineapple juice and grapefruit juice. Our training took place on the city streets and golf courses and theaters. A typical day was up at 5:10 A.M. to fall out in front of the hotel for Reville, 5:30 back to our rooms to clean them, 5:45 fall out in front and march to breakfast 6:30 back at our hotel to make our beds and clean the room, 7:00 we marched from our hotel to the drill field (which is the golf course), We trained until 11:00 marched back to our hotel at 11:30. Now we got our mail, and at 11:45 went to chow (lunch), then back to our hotel to clean it up again. At 1:00 P.M. we march back to the drill field and trained until 2:45 and got back to our hotel at 3:15. We change to our bathing suits and walk across street for P.T. on the sand beach, finish P.T. at4:45 and go back to our rooms and put on our Class A uniforms. We have Retreat 5:15 and chow at 6:25. The rest of day is ours. Lights out at 9:00 P.M. and in bed at 10:00 P.M. We trained 6 days a week, Sundays off, and I went to church on Sundays in town. November 1943 finished training and men were shipping out, I was not so I went to the Air Inspector Office to check out when I would be shipped out. He looked for my records and said I would be shipped out in 24 hours and I was. We went by train to Gettysburg College Dec. 5, 1943. ~~~ Posted by: cadetat6 Jul 29 2003 6:15 AM Almost AWOL Christmas Christmas Season 1943. I had been away from my fiancee for only 4 months when I arrived at Gettysburg College as Air Corps Cadet. I was a homesick fly boy. I called my Charlotte (Micky) and told her I missed her and was going A.W.O.L. and come home to see her. Bang!! I got a stern voice saying, "No you stay there†and she would come to see me. On Friday Dec 24 Micky came with my mother and father. I met them at 9 A.M. The next three days were great. Sunday night I walked (Gettysburg was only a couple of blocks in those days) them to the Bus Stop. I said goodbye and slowly walked back to "Old Dorm." which was our barracks and as the old song said "tears flowed like wine." ~~~ Posted by: cadetat6 Jul 29 2003 11:55 AM Army Air Corps, 3 Things Not To Do I had my pilot’s license before I enlisted in 1943 and found 3 things not to do.
  13. Cadetat6

    My Interview years later

    Army Air Corps: When the Army Air Force recruited the college students in 1942 as Aviation Cadets from the colleges and universities across the land, then they told the students that they were needed as officers in the rapidly expanding Army Air Force and would become pilots, navigators, or bombardiers. Furthermore, those that did not choose to fly and had two years of college would become an Aviation Cadet Ground Crew and commissioned in armaments, communication, meteorology, photography, or engineering. But, when the AAF discovered at the end of 1943 that their over zealous recruiting and over estimation of loss rate had created a large surplus of pilots, they ignored all of the promises made to the college students and began transferring them to technical schools. This did not create a pleasant situation for the schools or the ex-cadets. ~~~cadetat6 Jul 28 3002 10:24 AM Enlisted Reserve Corps, Boot Camp: AIR CADET. 1942 I received my civilian pilots license from Hartung Airport at Gratiot and 10-½ mile. 1943 I enlisted in the Army Air Corps. ERC (enlisted reserve Corps). I was sent to Miami Beach, Florida for basic training. We stayed in Netherlands Hotel on Ocean Drive across from the Atlantic Ocean. The Air Corps took over about 300 hotels on south Miami Beach. The first morning the sergeant walked on all the floors blowing whistle and telling every one to fall out in front of the hotel in 4 lines. We were marched (walked) to the Tide (green latrine) hotel for breakfast. As we lined up to go in, 2 kids walked along selling orange juice, pineapple juice and grapefruit juice. Our training took place on the city streets and golf courses and theaters. A typical day was up at 5:10 A.M. to fall out in front of the hotel for Reville, 5:30 back to our rooms to clean them, 5:45 fall out in front and march to breakfast 6:30 back at our hotel to make our beds and clean the room, 7:00 we marched from our hotel to the drill field (which is the golf course), We trained until 11:00 marched back to our hotel at 11:30. Now we got our mail, and at 11:45 went to chow (lunch), then back to our hotel to clean it up again. At 1:00 P.M. we march back to the drill field and trained until 2:45 and got back to our hotel at 3:15. We change to our bathing suits and walk across street for P.T. on the sand beach, finish P.T. at4:45 and go back to our rooms and put on our Class A uniforms. We have Retreat 5:15 and chow at 6:25. The rest of day is ours. Lights out at 9:00 P.M. and in bed at 10:00 P.M. We trained 6 days a week, Sundays off, and I went to church on Sundays in town. November 1943 finished training and men were shipping out, I was not so I went to the Air Inspector Office to check out when I would be shipped out. He looked for my records and said I would be shipped out in 24 hours and I was. We went by train to Gettysburg College Dec. 5, 1943. ~~~y: cadetat6 Jul 29 2003 6:15 AM
  14. Post #1 General Group: General Posts: 6240 Joined: 30-March 02 From: San Francisco Member No.: 15 Posted by: cadetat6 Jul 28 2003 2:21 PM Army Air Corps: When the Army Air Force recruited the college students in 1942 as Aviation Cadets from the colleges and universities across the land, then they told the students that they were needed as officers in the rapidly expanding Army Air Force and would become pilots, navigators, or bombardiers. Furthermore, those that did not choose to fly and had two years of college would become an Aviation Cadet Ground Crew and commissioned in armaments, communication, meteorology, photography, or engineering. But, when the AAF discovered at the end of 1943 that their over zealous recruiting and over estimation of loss rate had created a large surplus of pilots, they ignored all of the promises made to the college students and began transferring them to technical schools. This did not create a pleasant situation for the schools or the ex-cadets. ~~~ Posted by: cadetat6 Jul 28 3002 10:24 AM Enlisted Reserve Corps, Boot Camp: AIR CADET. 1942 I received my civilian pilots license from Hartung Airport at Gratiot and 10-½ mile. 1943 I enlisted in the Army Air Corps. ERC (enlisted reserve Corps). I was sent to Miami Beach, Florida for basic training. We stayed in Netherlands Hotel on Ocean Drive across from the Atlantic Ocean. The Air Corps took over about 300 hotels on south Miami Beach. The first morning the sergeant walked on all the floors blowing whistle and telling every one to fall out in front of the hotel in 4 lines. We were marched (walked) to the Tide (green latrine) hotel for breakfast. As we lined up to go in, 2 kids walked along selling orange juice, pineapple juice and grapefruit juice. Our training took place on the city streets and golf courses and theaters. A typical day was up at 5:10 A.M. to fall out in front of the hotel for Reville, 5:30 back to our rooms to clean them, 5:45 fall out in front and march to breakfast 6:30 back at our hotel to make our beds and clean the room, 7:00 we marched from our hotel to the drill field (which is the golf course), We trained until 11:00 marched back to our hotel at 11:30. Now we got our mail, and at 11:45 went to chow (lunch), then back to our hotel to clean it up again. At 1:00 P.M. we march back to the drill field and trained until 2:45 and got back to our hotel at 3:15. We change to our bathing suits and walk across street for P.T. on the sand beach, finish P.T. at4:45 and go back to our rooms and put on our Class A uniforms. We have Retreat 5:15 and chow at 6:25. The rest of day is ours. Lights out at 9:00 P.M. and in bed at 10:00 P.M. We trained 6 days a week, Sundays off, and I went to church on Sundays in town. November 1943 finished training and men were shipping out, I was not so I went to the Air Inspector Office to check out when I would be shipped out. He looked for my records and said I would be shipped out in 24 hours and I was. We went by train to Gettysburg College Dec. 5, 1943. ~~~ Posted by: cadetat6 Jul 29 2003 6:15 AM Almost AWOL Christmas Christmas Season 1943. I had been away from my fiancee for only 4 months when I arrived at Gettysburg College as Air Corps Cadet. I was a homesick fly boy. I called my Charlotte (Micky) and told her I missed her and was going A.W.O.L. and come home to see her. Bang!! I got a stern voice saying, "No you stay there†and she would come to see me. On Friday Dec 24 Micky came with my mother and father. I met them at 9 A.M. The next three days were great. Sunday night I walked (Gettysburg was only a couple of blocks in those days) them to the Bus Stop. I said goodbye and slowly walked back to "Old Dorm." which was our barracks and as the old song said "tears flowed like wine." ~~~ Posted by: cadetat6 Jul 29 2003 11:55 AM Army Air Corps, 3 Things Not To Do I had my pilot’s license before I enlisted in 1943 and found 3 things not to do. 1. On take off, do not drop the flaps and think your instructor did not see it. 2. Do not put your instructor's flight suit on, take his car key's, drive to the post office and mail a Christmas package for his wife to his mother-in-law. 3. On landing do not shut your radio off, do not watch the tower, do not land on the black top runway when they want you to land on cement runway. Art, a long, long ago air man ~~~ Posted by: cadetat6 Jul 29 2003 9:51 AM How we met – the love of my life Early in 1943, I went on a double date with a friend and the Matthews sisters to Eastwood Amusement Park at Gratiot and 8 mile. It was a long drive from Detroit's west side. I was paired with Blanche, but her sister, Charlotte (Micky) was a great looker and I thought she was the one for me. We all had a good time together. It was more like a friend's outing than a date. Two nights later, Micky was on her way home from her job at G.M.C. She stopped at Simone's soda fountain shop where I was having a frozen Power House candy bar. We talked a while and I asked her to go for a ride. We drove to Belle Isle in my father’s 1940 Ford and watched boats sail down the river. About four months later we got engaged just before I left for Army Air Corps cadet training. I returned to Detroit to get married during a week long furlough. Micky and I were apart for the next two years as I was sent to the Philippine Islands and occupation duty in Taegu, Korea. I returned home to her in July, 1946. We celebrated our 57th wedding anniversary May 15, 2001. Then Dec. 30, 2001 my Micky went to be with our Lord. Our daughters and son-in-law are Toni Ann Morneweck, Terry & Jack Ellis, and grandson Tim 16. We all live in same neighborhood in Novi. Micky's sister Blanche Rosendale, now lives in St. Clair. ~~~ WW2 Marriages: A short “I do†and off to war WW 2 marriages did not have tuxedos and long gowns but did have everlasting love. As a cadet we finished our tour at Gettysburg College and was given one week furlough Friday May 12,1944. From "Old Dorm" I called my fiancee and asked if she would marry me. She said yes, I jumped on a bus to Harrisburg, bought a new cadet hat, jumped on train for Detroit. On the train the porter looked at me, with wings on my shoulder, wings on my new cap, and humming our song "You'll never know how much I miss you". The porter said "Sir we have a better seat in the car ahead of us." I arrived home Saturday morning and found out we needed some papers filled out but offices were closed. Luck was with me, my future father-in-law had friends downtown, so everything was copasetic. We were married Monday May 15,1944 at 7 PM. We went downtown to the Hotel Fort Shelby. Shortly after arriving there my wife's sister and our best man came with White Castle Hamburgers. We spent the rest of the week on cloud nine floating around visiting friends. Sunday May 20, 1944 I left my love (boy, is this hard to write) and did not see her for two years while I went to Philippine Islands and Taegu, Korea. My wife is with our Lord now, looking down here and I can still hear her saying "Roy you are going to make yourself sick". Name Roy is another story, my middle name is LeRoy. May 20 I was back to Gettysburg College and we were shipped out to Maxwell Field, Alabama for Pre-flight. After pre-flight we went to Avon Park, Florida where we started flying the open cockpit Bi-wing PT-17 Stearman. Then to Lakeland Florida with same type of plane. Then to Cochran Field at Macon, Georgia flying the AT-6 Texan. January 1945 I was given check flight by a Captain and one by a Major. (I had my pilot’s license before joining the Air Corps.) The Major said I did OK but they had too many pilots and I was put in the Army Infantry. I went to Gainesville,Texas for infantry training. Finished training and went to New Jersey and then by train to Pittsburg, California and shipped out June 1, 1945 for the Philippine Islands. Korea 1945 – from Air Cadet to Philippines and Korea http://www.kilroywashere.org/003-Pages/ArtM/ArtM.html ~~~ Kellogg’s All-Bran and WW2 I have a friend who was WW2 tail gunner in a B-24 in England. He had a hearty breakfast of Kellogg's All-Bran before a mission over Germany. On the mission the All-Bran started to work. He was not going to fill his pants so he left his tailgunner position and went to the bomb bay doors and relieved himself. When they got back to their base he really got chewed out by the pilot. All I can think about is the German soldier looking up and plop! he gets it right in the face and said American secret weapon but it stinks. ~~~ Posted by Bart Aug 1 2003, 06:26 AM Unbelievable! By the way... I have read your introduction-posts (impressive militairy carreer!) and went searching for a little bit more information about your brother K.I.A. How terrible that he fell just a few weeks before the end of the war! You have my deepest sympathy! And I like to add that me (and so many others of my post-war generation) are still very gratefull for the young soldiers like you brother, who gave their lives for our freedom. Best regards, Bart, Holland ~~~ Max (UK) Posted: Aug 1 2003, 06:44 AM Sorry to hear about your brother, sir. Thanks for the All Bran story - that had me laughing loudly ! That All Bran ( Bran not Brand, btw ) really goes through you. ~~~ Posted by: Kiwiwriter Aug 1 2003, 08:20 AM Your friend proved that war is full of crap and that crap comes from the powers above. ~~~ Max (UK) Posted: Aug 1 2003, 09:03 AM Hehe. This is one of those times that in the middle of something so serious, something very funny emerges. A classic. ~~~ Posted by: cadetat6 Jul 31 2003, 02:33 PM I have a friend who received medal from Westmoreland in Korean War. He also served in WW 2. He is Ray Gonzales G companyof 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team. Ray does not have a computer so if any one wants to send me a e-mail I will see that Ray gets it. Art <papa@twmi.rr.com> ~~~ Posted by: cadetat6 Aug 2 2003, 03:31 AM My brother-in-law was Marine Officer in South Pacific Lt. V. Terry. This is his story in WW 2 -- Crossing the Equator. Three days away from the equator and then the ship’s captain and those men who had crossed the equator before, began to plan the festivities of the crossing. All who had crossed the equator were called Shellbacks, All who had not crossed the equator were referred to as dirty, slimy, filthy, Pollywogs. All Shellbacks had to show proof of their having crossed before, and all had a card of the Ancient Order of the Deep. Well, as I said, they planned the festivities and this is the result. Several of us were dress in rubber diver suites, completely zippered and buttoned, and we were made (by means of paddle suggestion) to climb the ladder up to the very top little bridge deck way the hell up in the air, and were given spy-glasses (two rolls of toilet tissue fastened together) with which we scanned the horizon for a sign from Davy Jones as to when the Equator would appear in all its glory and announce the arrival of King Neptune aboard the ship. Needless to say it was a warm job in that equatorial heat and out in the sun all buttoned up in rubber suits, I bet I lost 10 pounds that first afternoon. Well, it was worked like that by shifts for two days, about every ten minutes or so a Shell back would approach from the rear (usually a salty little pfc or corporal on his way back to combat for the second or third time) and question you about some ridiculous matter that would have no answer and as a result he would then paddle the devil out of you, and of course the rubber suit accentuated the sting of the paddle. Other hazing crews of Shellbacks were busy elsewhere, requiring anyone of any Rank to do anything he asked. You could do nothing to please them of course and all were paddled thoroughly during that three days session. The favorite request of the Shellbacks was that you Salaam and say Praise Allah, hurrah for the wonderful Shellbacks, and down with the dirty, slimy, filthy, Pollywogs. On each salaam as you bent forward on your knees they would timely administer a paddle to your fanny. Now these were not schoolgirls wielding the paddle but rollicking adult husky Marines and their heart was in their work, especially when the victim happened to be an officer and the Shellback on enlisted man, boy oh boy, their revenge must have been sweet and complete. Well, this went on for the entire three days, for the most part during our waking hours but it did happen sometime that you were hauled out of the sack and at irregular hours. At last the day came when the lookout announced that Davy Jones had signaled him that the Royal Party and His Royal Highness King Neptune (Neptunis Rex) would board the ship at high noon the next day and for all hands to be ready to receive him. Well the skipper of the ship ordered the Jolly Roger hoisted (the Pirate Flag of skull and crossbones). All Pollywogs were marked with an X on their forehead with gentian violet (a blue medicinal potion which is practically indelible), of course sometimes the brush slipped and one’s entire face got it. Well, at exactly noon the next day the Royal Party came aboard and there were these present (appropriately accorded in regular raiment, carried aboard nearly all ships for just this purpose) King Neptune, beard and all. The Royal Baby (a huge 250 pound Marine with head shaved and all rouged and lip-sticked) the Royal Barber, the Royal Doctors, and of course Davy Jones who dressed as a pirate somewhat like John Silver patch over eye etc. These men were well made-up and looked every bit the part with the exception of the gargantuan Royal Baby. Well the party started by all of us being lined up and awaiting the Royal Barber, while we waited we were one by one bathed with a sea hose which threw a stream of salt water from the sea about 4 inches thick and in order to make the job thorough we were required to back into it on our hands and knees, we were not clothed except for skivvies, and believe me the force of that hose was about like an enema on a large scale. Well after backing into the hose for a distance of about 10 feet we were somewhat surprised to find another hose of the same type playing on our faces, making breathing somewhat of an amphibious or something of operation as the water sometimes seemed to contain some bilge water besides the sea-water, so that initial phase was over we stood back and reveled in the misery of those behind us. Suddenly we were marched to the Barber, who proceeded to cut a runway down the center of our beautiful scalp, and I do mean scalp, he took several nicks out of mine besides the hair. The hair clippings fell into a barrel in which had been put some form of lard and shampoo. So after partially scalping us he proceeded to give us a shampoo, but he must have had poor vision because we didn’t get a shampoo but did get our eyes and mouth full of hair and shampoo and lard. Still sputtering we were taken before King Neptune’s elaborate throne where we were required to salaam many times to the rhythmic beat of the paddle, and then we moved over to worship the Royal Baby. This was the climax of the whole affair, the bouncing Royal Baby presented not her face to be kissed but her buttocks, which were diapered and over all about one inch of mustard was smeared. Well everyone had a natural hesitancy about sticking his face into a smear like that which to all appearances might well be imagined something entirely more unsavory than mustard. The court attendants here took the situation in hand (our heads) and with a decided push accomplished the fact. Thence we were placed upon the Royal Surgeon’s operating table and were asked how much we weighed. Of course everyone weighs one hundred and some pounds, and since nearly all say a hundred fifty six, etc they naturally form the Hun syllable with a kind of openmouthed grunt and at that precise moment the Royal Surgeon (large syringe of foul tasting alum-ish fluid in hand) squirts your mouth full and oral cavity being in such a wide-open state the stuff invariably caused much spewing and sputtering and in some cases violent nausea with dismaying results. After that none of us cared much what happened and not much more was possible, it didn’t seem. However it was then necessary for us to drink deep of the deep and a bucket was lowered over the side and some nice salt water was pulled aboard and we all were made to drink. Ugh. Well after several other sessions it seemed we were about to become Shellbacks, but no. Blindfolded and roped hand and foot we were dunked over the side, just a quick wetting for some, it wasn’t possible to do a thorough job on so many, thank goodness, then we were asked what the definition of a Shellback was: and then the trouble began. It seems that Pollywogs are allowed to mutiny if they do it in an orderly manner, and once of the larger and heftier members decided that this was the psychological moment. It was a dismal failure, as the Shellbacks anticipated such an attempt and was well prepared with hoses; it resulted in a washout for us. ~~~ Posted by: cadetat6 Aug 1 2003, 05:14 PM I don't know if this is true but it is said to be. A 4-engine bomber base at Sebring Florida men were sitting around talking, when the radio started receiving a call saying "coming in on one engine, coming in on one engine". The field got ready for the plane, soon in comes a plane -- one engine. It was a fighter – a one-engine plane. Now if this were true, the commandant of the field would have to wait until the 1-engine plane pilot got out and took his flight clothes off and make sure the pilot did not out-rank him. We had some high-ranking pilots in WW2 ~~~ Posted by: cadetat6 Aug 11 2003, 12:19 PM Any one have the straight dope on B-17 ball turret? I was told that the ball turret could not be raised up into the plane.At one air show I was told that the ball turret could be raised into the plane. I read about a plane could not drop the wheels and the ball turret man was killed. ~~~ Posted by: Etienne Aug 11 2003, 02:29 PM The ball turret on a B-17 did not retract into the fuselage like the ball turret on the B-24. Here is a pic of the 17's ball turret from inside the plane. (http://www.flightjournal.com/FJ/plane_profiles/b-17g/b17g_10_waist.asp) Here is a pic of the ball turret that is retracted on the 24. (http://www.b24bestweb.com/ballgun2.htm) Here is a great site for the Sperry Ball Turret. (http://www.softwhale.com/history/b-17/ball-turret.html) There were several incidents where gunners were killed because the ball would be jammed and they could not get out. Hope this helps... ~~~ Posted by: Murman Aug 13 2003, 12:23 PM i think that was in citizen soldiers cadet and i was wondering the same thing but the reason why the gunner died was not because it couldn't be retracted but that the landing gear wouldn't drop as well as the fact he couldn't get out. that stuff about skin chipping off hands because it was so cold was pretty horrific too. ~~~ Posted by Cadetat6 Aug 12 2003, 05:23 PM When I started I was with a group of 15 or more, one was Long John then I went to Veterans Stories and it is not moving. I am a WW 2 Vet who was flying cadet until they had too many pilots and I ended up in Infantry. I am one of the fading group they say we are losing 1000 a day. ~~~ Posted by VanessaBinder Aug 12 2003, 05:30 PM Well, I'm so glad your not one of the 1000/day and that we have you here to share with us your memories and thoughts. As you can see, LongJohn is extremely prolific in his writing and stories, please jump in and start sharing those stories. Your experience and history of this time is very important to us here on this site. Please, start sharing.... Regards, Vanessa ~~~ Posted by homefront41 Aug 12 2003, 06:08 PM Dear Art, I hope I can call you Art. I'm practically your age anyway! Here is where you should go to post. You can just continue to post your messages in this same place so that way everyone will know where to find your stories, and they'll all be in the same place. Just save this URL address to put in your browser when you want to post something new under your own name. I hope this helps. I hope you have many more to tell us. They are being read, I can assure you. Thank you, BK ~~~ Posted by Frenchie: Aug 14 2003, 01:53 PM Dear Sir, I am reading your stories with great interest, my homeplace "Normandie" was freed thanks to you and your fellowmen. Follow the link indicated by BK and keep writing. Thank you for being here. Nathalie ~~~ Posted by Kiwiwriter Aug 16 2003, 12:27 PM Welcome to Easy Company! Glad to see you! This post has been edited by homefront41: Aug 19 2003, 10:59 PM -------------------- "Victory at all costs and in spite of all terrors; victory, however long and hard the road may be, for without victory there is no survival." ~~ Winston Spencer Churchill, May 13, 1940 "History teaches that when you become indifferent and lose the will to fight, someone who has the will to fight will take over." ~~ Colonel Bull Simons "All the great things are simple, and many can be expressed in a single word: freedom, justice, honor, duty, mercy, hope." ~~ Winston Spencer Churchill The study of history makes for a citizenry worthy of its heroes. cadetat6 View Member Profile Add as Friend Send Message Find Member's Topics Find Member's Posts Aug 19 2003, 11:31 AM Post #2 Lieutenant Group: Lieutenant Posts: 120 Joined: 27-July 03 From: Novi, Michigan Member No.: 718 American Bantam Car Company, Butler,Pa. 1940 Karl K. Probst.of Detroit was hired by Bantam and they were the only company who said they could deliver a Prototype in 49 Day’s. Sept. 23,1940 Bantam drove a Prototype to Camp Holibard,Maryland only 30 minuties to spare. The Army tested the prototype and said it exceeded expectations. Then Ford and Willy’s watched, took notes andsubmitted their prototype.. Bantam only had about 1500 employes and could not produce the large number of Jeep’s thr Army wanted. They order was given to Ford and Willy’s. In 1943 Willy’s was charged for false and mis-leading advertising that they created the Jeep. Full Edit Quick Edit cadetat6 View Member Profile Add as Friend Send Message Find Member's Topics Find Member's Posts Aug 27 2003, 02:59 PM Post #3 Lieutenant Group: Lieutenant Posts: 120 Joined: 27-July 03 From: Novi, Michigan Member No.: 718 Hemorroids in WW2 One week in boot camp at Miami Beach,Florida. I had small pimple on butt,went to sick call and 1st Lt. Doctor said we can take that out here. . Luckly a Capt. Standing there said NO that for the hospital. In hospital Dr. Sikes did the operation and the ward boy told me not to sh_t until he came back. Evedentally he was following orders or he for-got me. A week later he came by and asked how I was doing. I said I have not sh_t in a week. He ran down to the pharmacy and came back with a small black pill and had me swallow it. The pill worked, it whent down,, got size of a water mellon and exploded. What a relief Art Full Edit Quick Edit 4deucer View Member Profile Add as Friend Send Message Find Member's Topics Find Member's Posts Aug 27 2003, 04:58 PM Post #4 Major Group: Major Posts: 476 Joined: 21-July 03 From: Southeast USA Member No.: 698 AH! AH! AH! (That's apparently French for HA! HA! HA!) That's the one of the funniest! KA-BLOOEY!!! Right out the old chute! What a story! Thanks. Say, that camp at Miami Beach...do you happen to remember its name? Was it Camp Blanding? My Dad started boot camp (his little diary says Miami Beach), but I've been unable to find the names of any camps in Miami Beach during that time. Maybe it was in the Miami Beach AREA? You know, just outside, etc? Anyway, I've enjoyed all your posts! Keep 'em coming! -------------------- "Goin' My Way?" 4deucer "Post Nubila Victoria" (After The Clouds, Victory) 82nd Chemical Mortar Battalion Honoring the memory of my hero, my Dad, George L. Welch, Jr.(1919-1986), Sergeant, U.S. Army, Co. B, 82nd CMB, 103rd Infantry Regiment, 43rd Infantry Division (Winged Victory), Luzon Campaign, Philippines, June-Sep 1945, and occupation of Japan, Sep 1945-Jan 1946 4deucer View Member Profile Add as Friend Send Message Find Member's Topics Find Member's Posts Aug 27 2003, 05:05 PM Post #5 Major Group: Major Posts: 476 Joined: 21-July 03 From: Southeast USA Member No.: 698 QUOTE(cadetat6 @ Aug 19 2003, 10:31 AM) American Bantam Car Company, Butler,Pa. 1940 Karl K. Probst.of Detroit was hired by Bantam and they were the only company who said they could deliver a Prototype in 49 Day’s. Sept. 23,1940 Bantam drove a Prototype to Camp Holibard,Maryland only 30 minuties to spare. The Army tested the prototype and said it exceeded expectations. Then Ford and Willy’s watched, took notes andsubmitted their prototype.. Bantam only had about 1500 employes and could not produce the large number of Jeep’s thr Army wanted. They order was given to Ford and Willy’s. In 1943 Willy’s was charged for false and mis-leading advertising that they created the Jeep. You're absolutely correct. Bantam had its design "stolen" from them by the other two bidders, partly, or maybe mostly, because of the urgent need by the government to get a vehicle like this pressed into service in mass quantities for the war effort. It's a shame for Bantam, but it sort of "had to be." Talk about poor timing or rotten destiny! -------------------- "Goin' My Way?" 4deucer "Post Nubila Victoria" (After The Clouds, Victory) 82nd Chemical Mortar Battalion Honoring the memory of my hero, my Dad, George L. Welch, Jr.(1919-1986), Sergeant, U.S. Army, Co. B, 82nd CMB, 103rd Infantry Regiment, 43rd Infantry Division (Winged Victory), Luzon Campaign, Philippines, June-Sep 1945, and occupation of Japan, Sep 1945-Jan 1946 cadetat6 View Member Profile Add as Friend Send Message Find Member's Topics Find Member's Posts Aug 27 2003, 09:26 PM Post #6 Lieutenant Group: Lieutenant Posts: 120 Joined: 27-July 03 From: Novi, Michigan Member No.: 718 4deucer, Miami Beach, Florida I don't remember calling it any camp. I only type with one finger but here is a copy of newspaper Full Edit Quick Edit cadetat6 View Member Profile Add as Friend Send Message Find Member's Topics Find Member's Posts Aug 27 2003, 09:53 PM Post #7 Lieutenant Group: Lieutenant Posts: 120 Joined: 27-July 03 From: Novi, Michigan Member No.: 718 4deucer, only one finger and I still screwed up Here we go again AIR FORCE TRAINEES CAMP AT MIAMI HOTELS April 1, 1942 The government has notified Miami hotel ownersthat theAir Force will be taking over many of the city's 300 resort hotels to house up to 30,000 trainees. The men will be run through a training center--dubbed by the cadets "Camp Miami Beach"---that will graduate non-flying officer trainees at the rate of 1,000 a day. This article was in Detroit News April 1,1942 I have a diary and I stayed in Netherland Hotel and it was across the street foom the Atlatic Ocean. Martching was done on paved roads and other training done on golf courses Art Full Edit Quick Edit Morgy View Member Profile Add as Friend Send Message Find Member's Topics Find Member's Posts Aug 28 2003, 05:23 AM Post #8 Lions of the Lowlands Group: General Posts: 2361 Joined: 29-October 02 From: Belgium Member No.: 261 I follow 4 Deucer here Sir : keep your stories coming. The European youth is reading them. Morgy -------------------- "Chantez, compagnons, dans la nuit la Liberté nous écoute..." J.Kessel, M.Druon "Etre libre, c'est aimer les gens que l'on veut [...]" L. Aubrac. "L'héroïsme, le vrai, c'est de trembler et d'y aller quand même. " G. Rivière. In memory of Bonpa Joseph --------------------------- --------------------------- Go go go Foxhole Company ! --------------------------- 4deucer View Member Profile Add as Friend Send Message Find Member's Topics Find Member's Posts Aug 28 2003, 10:33 PM Post #9 Major Group: Major Posts: 476 Joined: 21-July 03 From: Southeast USA Member No.: 698 QUOTE(cadetat6 @ Aug 27 2003, 08:53 PM) AIR FORCE TRAINEES CAMP AT MIAMI HOTELS April 1, 1942 The government has notified Miami hotel ownersthat theAir Force will be taking over many of the city's 300 resort hotels to house up to 30,000 trainees. The men will be run through a training center--dubbed by the cadets "Camp Miami Beach"---that will graduate non-flying officer trainees at the rate of 1,000 a day. Art Sir, Magnificent response! Thanks so much! My Dad wore the sleeve patch of the AAF for many months while here in the States. He got transferred to the Army infantry when the AAF became full, and went from Miami Beach to some proving grounds in Illinois. I still talk to his youngest brother (my Uncle John, who they called 'Peanut' only because he was the youngest of the 5 brothers). Uncle John is 82 this year. Uncle John told me that my Dad's unit got pretty cold in Illinois because they moved them out from Florida in such a hurry that they didn't have time to issue cold climate clothing. From Illinois, Dad went for Chemical Warfare training at Ft. Meade, Maryland, then further infantry training at Fort Howze, Texas, where he earned his Expert Marksman Badge with Carbine and 50 ca. Machine Gun bars. From there, as best I can tell, to maneuvers in Louisiana, then to San Francisco, CA where they shipped out for the Philippines in early 1945. Thank you for writing. Please let us hear more from you! Respectfully, This post has been edited by 4deucer: Aug 28 2003, 11:01 PM -------------------- "Goin' My Way?" 4deucer "Post Nubila Victoria" (After The Clouds, Victory) 82nd Chemical Mortar Battalion Honoring the memory of my hero, my Dad, George L. Welch, Jr.(1919-1986), Sergeant, U.S. Army, Co. B, 82nd CMB, 103rd Infantry Regiment, 43rd Infantry Division (Winged Victory), Luzon Campaign, Philippines, June-Sep 1945, and occupation of Japan, Sep 1945-Jan 1946 cadetat6 View Member Profile Add as Friend Send Message Find Member's Topics Find Member's Posts Aug 29 2003, 03:01 PM Post #10 Lieutenant Group: Lieutenant Posts: 120 Joined: 27-July 03 From: Novi, Michigan Member No.: 718 aducer, I know what your father went through. After flying AT-6 they asked me were I wanteded to go . All I thought of was what air base was closest to my home It was chanute field ,had opening for teletype repair man. I jumped at the chance and went to chanute field. After a couple of days, I was woke up at mid-night and told to pack my barrack's bag. I packed and they were checking me out and a wcc asked me if I knew were I was going, I said NO and she said to the Infantry. I was too tired to know what was going on but a couple days later I was in a Gainsville Texas army camp. The first thing I seen was a army officer slouched in a chair with dirty clothes on.. BANG I thought whatt am I getting in to. In air cadets I never seen a officer in dirty cloths.But I thought this is better than reporting to German officer Art long ago air man Full Edit Quick Edit cadetat6 View Member Profile Add as Friend Send Message Find Member's Topics Find Member's Posts Aug 31 2003, 02:09 PM Post #11 Lieutenant Group: Lieutenant Posts: 120 Joined: 27-July 03 From: Novi, Michigan Member No.: 718 I just had a senior momemt about Miami Beach ,Florida 1943 Some called it The country Club of the Air Corp. Art Full Edit Quick Edit cadetat6 View Member Profile Add as Friend Send Message Find Member's Topics Find Member's Posts Sep 2 2003, 04:55 PM Post #12 Lieutenant Group: Lieutenant Posts: 120 Joined: 27-July 03 From: Novi, Michigan Member No.: 718 any one know what I would do to get medals and ribbons of my brother He was KIA and my grand soin is only nephew he had Full Edit Quick Edit homefront41 View Member Profile Add as Friend Send Message Find Member's Topics Find Member's Posts Sep 3 2003, 12:22 AM Post #13 General Group: General Posts: 6240 Joined: 30-March 02 From: San Francisco Member No.: 15 Sit tight, Art. I'll ask around. I'm sure we can get some good information about this. BK -------------------- "Victory at all costs and in spite of all terrors; victory, however long and hard the road may be, for without victory there is no survival." ~~ Winston Spencer Churchill, May 13, 1940 "History teaches that when you become indifferent and lose the will to fight, someone who has the will to fight will take over." ~~ Colonel Bull Simons "All the great things are simple, and many can be expressed in a single word: freedom, justice, honor, duty, mercy, hope." ~~ Winston Spencer Churchill The study of history makes for a citizenry worthy of its heroes. 4deucer View Member Profile Add as Friend Send Message Find Member's Topics Find Member's Posts Sep 3 2003, 08:20 AM Post #14 Major Group: Major Posts: 476 Joined: 21-July 03 From: Southeast USA Member No.: 698 Sir, Follow this link: http://www.archives.gov/research_room/vetrecs/ He needs to either fill in the online request Form 180, or print out the Form 180 that is available by following links on the NARA page. Encourage patience, it takes them at least 8-10 months to respond. But they will. Best of luck! Respectfully, -------------------- "Goin' My Way?" 4deucer "Post Nubila Victoria" (After The Clouds, Victory) 82nd Chemical Mortar Battalion Honoring the memory of my hero, my Dad, George L. Welch, Jr.(1919-1986), Sergeant, U.S. Army, Co. B, 82nd CMB, 103rd Infantry Regiment, 43rd Infantry Division (Winged Victory), Luzon Campaign, Philippines, June-Sep 1945, and occupation of Japan, Sep 1945-Jan 1946 cadetat6 View Member Profile Add as Friend Send Message Find Member's Topics Find Member's Posts Sep 3 2003, 09:01 AM Post #15 Lieutenant Group: Lieutenant Posts: 120 Joined: 27-July 03 From: Novi, Michigan Member No.: 718 Thanks to every one for info on forms I need. I just ordered FORM 180 Full Edit Quick Edit « Next Oldest · Veterans Stories · Next Newest » 10 Pages 1 2 3 > » Jump to Page 1 User(s) are reading this topic (0 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users) 1 Members: cadetat6 Fast Reply Enable email notification of replies | Enable Smilies | Enable Signature Forum Home Search Help Air Transport |-- Wildbill Guarnere.com |-- Visit our new Mercantile! |-- Get your Jumpwings Today! |-- Search the Forums |-- The Flash Intro |-- Pixeldust Films.com Jump School |-- Battalion Headquarters |---- Moderator's Headquarters |-- The Mess Hall |-- Forums 101 |-- The Avatar Bar Articles and Press Clippings |-- Wild Bill Articles and Press Gateway The Posters Hall of Fame |-- Posts you Need to Read |---- Homefront's Virtual Scrapbook Special Topics Gateway |-- Special Assignment Exchange |---- The Holocaust |---- Between the Wars |---- Espionage |---- Pacific Theatre of Operations |---- Eastern Front |---- Wartime Politics |---- War Games- What If? 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  15. Cadetat6

    Post VE Day letter from MP buddy in Austria

    HERE IS MORE ON 85 P0INTS CADETAT6 PAPA Don Langer passed away on November 4, 2004 USMC discharge. Points: 1 point for each month in service, 2 points for each months overseas, 5 points for every ribbon, and 5 points for each additional star. 85 Points were needed for discharge; I had about 125 and received my discharge out of Bainbridge, MD The ASR or Advanced Service Rating Points System found on the Enlisted Record and Report of Separation was used to determine a soldier's eligibility for discharge. The higher the score, the closer one was to going home. At the end of the war in Europe, 85 points were required for discharge. This was later lowered to 75 as demobilization continued and finally reached 60 in November 1945. Many found the system confusing and it did not apply to all servicemen. For example, pilots went home after 25 combat missions regardless of points accumulated, although they still remained in the service. The points were awarded as follows: 1 point for each month served in the Army, 1 point for each month served overseas, 5 points for each campaign star worn on theater ribbons, 5 points for the first and each award received such as Distinquished Service Cross, etc., and 12 points for each child at home under 18 years of age (up to 3 children). Points were awarded for months served between 16 September 1940 and 12 May 1945.
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